T Nation

The end of gun control

Eventually 3-D printers will be ubiquitous. This is the end of gun control.

[quote]Sloth wrote:
Eventually 3-D printers will be ubiquitous. This is the end of gun control.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/49329268[/quote]

Dude…

Fuck it, congrats man you figured it out.

No, I cant, I posted the BSP SMG 9mm, blueprint and all.

You can build a sub machine gun right now if you are so inclined.

3D mumbo jumbo?

Get some standard plumbing parts and you have an automatic gun in no time.

You might also want to look into the British STEN (??? I think), which was supposed to be tinkered together in back alleys and to use German ammunition in case of an invasion.

[quote]orion wrote:

[quote]Sloth wrote:
Eventually 3-D printers will be ubiquitous. This is the end of gun control.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/49329268[/quote]

Dude…

Fuck it, congrats man you figured it out.

No, I cant, I posted the BSP SMG 9mm, blueprint and all.

You can build a sub machine gun right now if you are so inclined.

3D mumbo jumbo?

Get some standard plumbing parts and you have an automatic gun in no time.

You might also want to look into the British STEN (??? I think), which was supposed to be tinkered together in back alleys and to use German ammunition in case of an invasion. [/quote]

Plumbing parts? You luddite! With this technology you hit the button and check back later!

[quote]Sloth wrote:

[quote]orion wrote:

[quote]Sloth wrote:
Eventually 3-D printers will be ubiquitous. This is the end of gun control.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/49329268[/quote]

Dude…

Fuck it, congrats man you figured it out.

No, I cant, I posted the BSP SMG 9mm, blueprint and all.

You can build a sub machine gun right now if you are so inclined.

3D mumbo jumbo?

Get some standard plumbing parts and you have an automatic gun in no time.

You might also want to look into the British STEN (??? I think), which was supposed to be tinkered together in back alleys and to use German ammunition in case of an invasion. [/quote]

Plumbing parts? You luddite! With this technology you hit the button and check back later!
[/quote]

Yeah, but if you hit the trigger your plastic toy will come apart.

Get some nice high pressure plumbing parts and you will actually hurt your enemies instead of yourself.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

I have been following 3D printing for a little while now and am amazed at how little general awareness there is about it. It’s going to be a hugely revolutionary technology very soon.

The possibilities in this article are not that far out there at all and entirely possible in 5 to 10 years at most.

Also, these printers will be able to print things made of more then just plastic and with the inevitable introduction of nanotechnology into these machines you will be able to print something of almost any composition.

edit - apparently they already have the tech to print a variety of different materials including plastics, metals, and glass.

[quote]tmay11 wrote:
I have been following 3D printing for a little while now and am amazed at how little general awareness there is about it. It’s going to be a hugely revolutionary technology very soon.

The possibilities in this article are not that far out there at all and entirely possible in 5 to 10 years at most.

Also, these printers will be able to print things made of more then just plastic and with the inevitable introduction of nanotechnology into these machines you will be able to print something of almost any composition. [/quote]

Agreed, it’s going to be nuts. I could see one of these in every middle-class home within a decade or so.

[quote]smh23 wrote:

[quote]tmay11 wrote:
I have been following 3D printing for a little while now and am amazed at how little general awareness there is about it. It’s going to be a hugely revolutionary technology very soon.

The possibilities in this article are not that far out there at all and entirely possible in 5 to 10 years at most.

Also, these printers will be able to print things made of more then just plastic and with the inevitable introduction of nanotechnology into these machines you will be able to print something of almost any composition. [/quote]

Agreed, it’s going to be nuts. I could see one of these in every middle-class home within a decade or so.[/quote]

Definitely.

Need a car part - download file, print, done. Need a light bulb - download file, print, done. Need a pair of glasses - download file, print, done.

I image it sorta like torrents now, except instead of just music, text, and video files, you will be able to download consumer goods.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

None of these weapons would fire more than once — metal is needed for the barrel and receiver.

If I want a home-made weapon that would fire a couple times, I’d use a thumbtack and a car antenna to make a .22 zip gun like when I was 10 and stole a brick of .22 LR from the pawn shop. If I was being fancy, I’d add a rubber band and a block of wood.

As an aside we used to make zip guns with multiple barrels out of steel tubing from the hardware store. About 17 inches long and fire 10 .22LR all at the same time. We’d liquidate skunks and other nasties with this out of our car using sub-sonic .22 rounds. (Sub-sonic so we could shoot in town and Johnny Law didn’t bother us. Little noise and they don’t travel far.) They’d just turn to pulp.

Ah, fun in the mountains.

Anyway, the point is, anyone with half a brain and basic household skills can already make far better weapons than this by going to Home Depot. You don’t need no stinkin 3D printer.

I’ve got a buddy who started doing this, and now makes a mint selling “coach guns” (short side-by-side shotguns) for cowboy shooters. He does everything in his garage.

Would it be/is it legal to make a gun at home? What about selling it?

They also have 3D printing of organs

and that video is almost 2 years old.

[quote]tmay11 wrote:
I have been following 3D printing for a little while now and am amazed at how little general awareness there is about it. It’s going to be a hugely revolutionary technology very soon.

The possibilities in this article are not that far out there at all and entirely possible in 5 to 10 years at most.

Also, these printers will be able to print things made of more then just plastic and with the inevitable introduction of nanotechnology into these machines you will be able to print something of almost any composition.

edit - apparently they already have the tech to print a variety of different materials including plastics, metals, and glass. [/quote]
they sure do. i received some prototype parts made from Stainless steel with a 3d print method just a few weeks ago.

[quote]xXSeraphimXx wrote:
Would it be/is it legal to make a gun at home? What about selling it?[/quote]
No. Gun sales are pretty tightly regulated. But as long as you don’t get caught…

[quote]YoungSouth wrote:

[quote]xXSeraphimXx wrote:
Would it be/is it legal to make a gun at home? What about selling it?[/quote]
No. Gun sales are pretty tightly regulated. But as long as you don’t get caught…[/quote]

There is no federal law against making guns at home, provided they are not automatic weapons, short shotguns, or for re-sale.

In fact, they sell kits to do just that, all day long. I built an AR-15, for example.

From the ATF website:

“With certain exceptions a firearm may be made by a non-licensee provided it is not for sale and the maker is not prohibited from possessing firearms. However, a person is prohibited from assembling a non-sporting semi-automatic rifle or non-sporting shotgun from imported parts. In addition, the making of an NFA firearm requires a tax payment and approval by ATF. An application to make a machine gun will not be approved unless documentation is submitted showing that the firearm is being made for a Federal or State agency.”

[18 U.S.C. 922(o) and ®, 26 U.S.C. 5822, 27 CFR 478.39, 479.62 and 479.105] http://www.atf.treas.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#a6

[quote]thethirdruffian wrote:

[quote]YoungSouth wrote:

[quote]xXSeraphimXx wrote:
Would it be/is it legal to make a gun at home? What about selling it?[/quote]
No. Gun sales are pretty tightly regulated. But as long as you don’t get caught…[/quote]

There is no federal law against making guns at home, provided they are not automatic weapons, short shotguns, or for re-sale.

In fact, they sell kits to do just that, all day long. I built an AR-15, for example.

From the ATF website:

“With certain exceptions a firearm may be made by a non-licensee provided it is not for sale and the maker is not prohibited from possessing firearms. However, a person is prohibited from assembling a non-sporting semi-automatic rifle or non-sporting shotgun from imported parts. In addition, the making of an NFA firearm requires a tax payment and approval by ATF. An application to make a machine gun will not be approved unless documentation is submitted showing that the firearm is being made for a Federal or State agency.”

[18 U.S.C. 922(o) and ®, 26 U.S.C. 5822, 27 CFR 478.39, 479.62 and 479.105] http://www.atf.treas.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#a6
[/quote]
I was referencing sales.

To add, kits are regulated when bought through proper channels. You can’t start cranking out zip guns.

[quote]YoungSouth wrote:
To add, kits are regulated when bought through proper channels. You can’t start cranking out zip guns.[/quote]

Um, no. There are no regulations.

AR-15 kits require no paperwork whatsoever. All they do is send the lower receiver at 80% complete with “drill here” spots marked. Anyone with a drill press and a drimmel can finish them off.

Here:

http://www.ar15gunkits.com/contents/en-us/d1_AR15kits.html

No ATF anything required.