T Nation

The 'Dr' Title & Who Uses It

[quote]BONEZ217 wrote:

How often do you meet a surgeon at a party that doesn’t introduce himself with his first name? [/quote]

Oh wait, you mean real people…

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
Your view is quite ignorant. You should study the etymology of the word and historical usage before announcing how words “should” be used.

Perhaps the problem is that in your mind the word is synonymous with “physician.” It is not.[/quote]

You would be surprised by how many people like that are on this forum.

I doubt anyone with that mentality has ever actually come close to receiving a degree that would grant them that title.

Oh FFS, here we go again with “dentists aren’t doctors”.

When I fill out online forms, I use “Sir” as my title - because I’m that cool.

It’s the internet and no one can stop me anyway.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Bill Roberts wrote:
Your view is quite ignorant. You should study the etymology of the word and historical usage before announcing how words “should” be used.

Perhaps the problem is that in your mind the word is synonymous with “physician.” It is not.

You would be surprised by how many people like that are on this forum.

I doubt anyone with that mentality has ever actually come close to receiving a degree that would grant them that title.[/quote]

True. The only time I ever think about stuff like this is when it comes up in a place like this. In fact, even my business card doesn’t have Dr. on it. Just Ph.D. at the end of my name. Who the hell cares anyway?

I am currently attending a university and I would never dare disrespect one of my professors by calling them Mr or Mrs. I have endless respect for people with that level of education and I think they deserve recognition for their hard work.

Tell me Sir RSGZ, when were you conferred the title of “Sir”? Shall we call you “Sir” or do you only insist that the OP refer to you as “Sir”?

Here in Mexico people are normally referred to by a title in a work setting. Because I am a science graduate I get referred to as Injeniero. Someone with an arts degree would typically be referred to as Licenciado. When I am teaching jiujitsu the trainees often refer to me as profesor or prof.

Personally I hate all that and want people to just use my first name. That said, if I ever get my PhD you can be damn sure all my bank cards will have doctor on them.

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:

Perhaps the problem is that in your mind the word, as a title, is synonymous with “physician.” It is not.[/quote]

Yeah that’s what I automatically think.

If you want to differentiate someone being a medical doctor most people will say or ask, he is or is he, an MD.

“Oh so and so, yea he’s a doctor, an MD”

Although I must say it seems more appropriate to call someone a doctor when you know them in a capacity that treats your body or mind, or because they are so well known for their research or field of study that it seems proper to use the word doctor.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Bill Roberts wrote:
Your view is quite ignorant. You should study the etymology of the word and historical usage before announcing how words “should” be used.

Perhaps the problem is that in your mind the word is synonymous with “physician.” It is not.

You would be surprised by how many people like that are on this forum.

I doubt anyone with that mentality has ever actually come close to receiving a degree that would grant them that title.[/quote]

Prof X, completely unrelated but how/why did you end up in Dentistry?
Just curiosity on my end. Can’t remember ever reading one of your posts addressing this (apologies if this is something you have addressed ad-neaseum).
Got to be something else to have your teeth pulled by a 300lb guy. My kids would love that!

Yah I think it’s totally cool if people want to call you “Doc”, it would be kinda weird if you expected them to. What a tremendous amount of school, not alot of people can handle it…Big props to those who hang in there.

  • Adam

[quote]Professor X wrote:
adamhum wrote:
I think you should be called Master if you have a Master’s degree!

It does seem retarded outside of a professional setting, but the person did earn it. I think if you do call yourself doctor and expect others too, you’re kind of a douche. It’s best you hang around other douche’s…

:slight_smile:

I apologize for missing the part about being in a professional setting and not one doctor I know introduces themselves in public as “doctor”. It usually quickly comes up in conversation, but unless I am speaking to someone related to my field or talking about a related subject, few people even hear what I do for a living outside of work.

Edit: Lately, most people who know me do call me “doc” outside of work.[/quote]

[quote]matko5 wrote:
When I get my Ph.D I’ll bitchslap anyone who DOESN’T call me doctor.[/quote]

HERE HERE!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4a2_7zGS94

I love it when people who have honorary doctorates that insist you call them Dr. The more money you give to a school to higher your chances of getting an honorary doctorate.

I think that someone who has gotten their doctorate and has gone to college and invested that much time and money accross a span of what is normally 7 years or more can be called doctor if they choose. regardless of the situation. However, i doubt in a casual setting too many people would introduce themselves as doctors.

I suspect the OP would not like life in Germany, where if a man has two doctorates, you address him as Herr Doktor Doktor.

(Seriously.)

I’m contemplating on applying to an M.D/ph.D program next year. Not for the fact that people MUST call me doctor (I’d rather they didn’t) but it’s cool adding letters to your name. It’s like baseball cards or something, just collect as many as you can. Oh and the schooling is free too.

Then you must insist on being called Doctor Doctor So-and-so :wink:

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
I suspect the OP would not like life in Germany, where if a man has two doctorates, you address him as Herr Doktor Doktor.

(Seriously.)[/quote]

Ha, that reminds me of when I visited Freiberger Compound Materials in Germany a few years ago for my last job. Some of the researchers there were addressed as Herr Doktor. I just pulled out a copy of the business cards and sure enough, they are written as:

“Dr.” first name last name

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
I suspect the OP would not like life in Germany, where if a man has two doctorates, you address him as Herr Doktor Doktor.

(Seriously.)[/quote]

That’s hilarious.