T Nation

The Bulgarian Method


#1

been serching the internet for ansewers and this is what i could find.

day1: max squat (rpe9), backoff sets ( 3x1 or 3x2 or 3x3 depending on how i feel),
max bench (rpe9), backoff sets ( 3x1 or 3x2 or 3x3 depending on how i feel)

day2: 70% deadlift singels 10x1 for speed, OHP 5x5 70%, bent over rows, pullups.

day3: max squat (rpe9), backoff sets ( 3x1 or 3x2 or 3x3 depending on how i feel),
max bench (rpe9), backoff sets ( 3x1 or 3x2 or 3x3 depending on how i feel)

day4: max squat (rpe9), backoff sets ( 3x1 or 3x2 or 3x3 depending on how i feel),
max bench (rpe9), backoff sets ( 3x1 or 3x2 or 3x3 depending on how i feel)

day5: max deadlift (rpe9), backoff sets ( 3x1 or 3x2 or 3x3 depending on how i feel),
OHP 5x5, bent over rows, pullups, abs

this is one weeks work. i will put in highbar pause squats once a week insted of regular squat and i will put in narrow grip bench once a week aswell.

my question is does this look good? should i squat when i do my speed deadlift work on day 2? any other sugestions or thoughts? all info is wellcome!!


#2

I haven’t done the Bulgarian method yet so I don’t know exactly how to program the workload. But when I do a first run through I would probably be consistent in doing the back off sets during the volume phase and be more flexible with the set/rep scheme when wanting to peak.

For example I would do 1 backoff set at X reps. I would do this for a few weeks to see how I respond. If it’s not enough volume I would add another set. The intensity for backoff sets depend on how you feel. IMO, during a volume phase the set/rep schemes should have structure while intensity is variable and during an intensity phase the intensity is more structured while the volume is variable. When I feel like peaking I would drop the backoff sets based on what’s necessary for recovery.

Using a fixed set/rep scheme for volume will give you a baseline to work off of. But it isn’t necessary if you have a really good idea of what your body is capable of and what is needed to get the right training effect.


#3

Screw “RPEs” and all that bullshit, lift to a maximum. It does not depend on how you feel. If you don’t want to do this everyday, you can build to a heavy single that’s within 10lbs of a missed lift (I do this if I’m being cautious), but NEVER use RPEs on a daily max routine. Also, I really feel that light deadlifts or speed pulls are worthless; my deadlift went up when I started to train it properly - have one heavy DL day a week, and don’t skimp on the upper back assistance (though I’d be careful with barbell rows due to back fatigue, seated is likely your best bet most of the time).

Otherwise, good luck! Just go for it and watch your technique to avoid long-term problems. I can’t link to it here, but search for Pat Mendes’ Americanized Bulgarian program on his site if you’d like a basic outline, then add in a DL day in place of one squat day and 2-3 bench sessions per week.

EDIT: I train like this and have progressed well, hence my advice above


#4

Look up Damien Pezzuti’s article on liftbigeatbig for an idea of how to start this. He recommends starting with 3 days a week and adding a light day once you stall, eventually turn that into another max-out day and then later add another light day and so on. I think the biggest mistake is jumping into this head first, especially if you are on a low frequency program right now. You should not be doing more total volume than in your current program, and maybe even less because the intensity will make up for it. I have tried this before and wasn’t able to keep it up, mostly from starting with too much volume and then getting shoulder/arm pain from frequent squatting. However, I know a guy who added about 40 lbs. to his squat and more than 50 to his deadlift (bench went nowhere) in 4 months. He actually reduce deadlift volume a lot, he had one speed deadlift day (which he eventually cut out) and another day where he worked up to a max triple never a max single) with no backoff work, his deadlift never went up so fast before. It might work for you, it might not, but if you are determined to do it then give it a try.

A few pieces of advice:
-minimize accessory work, just some rows/chins for shoulder health and curls if you are going to bench every day
-don’t do too much deadlift volume because it will be harder to recover from, your back will already be taking a beating. The squat volume should help your deadlift.
-consider using some squat variations like SSB, high bar, or front squat. A lot of people get shoulder issues from frequent low bar squatting, I only know of two elite lifters using this method, Pezzuti squats high bar and Tom Martin mostly does high bar in training. In fact, Greg Nuckols told me that he doesn’t do low bar squats at all when he does a daily squatting phase.


#5

[quote]halcj wrote:
Screw “RPEs” and all that bullshit, lift to a maximum. It does not depend on how you feel. If you don’t want to do this everyday, you can build to a heavy single that’s within 10lbs of a missed lift (I do this if I’m being cautious), but NEVER use RPEs on a daily max routine. Also, I really feel that light deadlifts or speed pulls are worthless; my deadlift went up when I started to train it properly - have one heavy DL day a week, and don’t skimp on the upper back assistance (though I’d be careful with barbell rows due to back fatigue, seated is likely your best bet most of the time).

Otherwise, good luck! Just go for it and watch your technique to avoid long-term problems. I can’t link to it here, but search for Pat Mendes’ Americanized Bulgarian program on his site if you’d like a basic outline, then add in a DL day in place of one squat day and 2-3 bench sessions per week.

EDIT: I train like this and have progressed well, hence my advice above
[/quote]
You could use RPE on the down sets if it makes you feel better, but it doesn’t make sense for the max singles. Max singles are @10, maybe 9.5. I’m not sure about Pat Mendes’ program though, he says to add weight until you fail a rep.

I agree that speed deadlifts are useless, it’s like cardio. Pezzuti does them sometimes, but I doubt it’s necessary, just a light deadlift day.


#6

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:
Look up Damien Pezzuti’s article on liftbigeatbig for an idea of how to start this. He recommends starting with 3 days a week and adding a light day once you stall, eventually turn that into another max-out day and then later add another light day and so on. I think the biggest mistake is jumping into this head first, especially if you are on a low frequency program right now. You should not be doing more total volume than in your current program, and maybe even less because the intensity will make up for it. I have tried this before and wasn’t able to keep it up, mostly from starting with too much volume and then getting shoulder/arm pain from frequent squatting. However, I know a guy who added about 40 lbs. to his squat and more than 50 to his deadlift (bench went nowhere) in 4 months. He actually reduce deadlift volume a lot, he had one speed deadlift day (which he eventually cut out) and another day where he worked up to a max triple never a max single) with no backoff work, his deadlift never went up so fast before. It might work for you, it might not, but if you are determined to do it then give it a try.

A few pieces of advice:
-minimize accessory work, just some rows/chins for shoulder health and curls if you are going to bench every day
-don’t do too much deadlift volume because it will be harder to recover from, your back will already be taking a beating. The squat volume should help your deadlift.
-consider using some squat variations like SSB, high bar, or front squat. A lot of people get shoulder issues from frequent low bar squatting, I only know of two elite lifters using this method, Pezzuti squats high bar and Tom Martin mostly does high bar in training. In fact, Greg Nuckols told me that he doesn’t do low bar squats at all when he does a daily squatting phase.[/quote]

I have to say, I disagree. Squatting to 80% 7 days a week is ridiculously easy - start with 3 max days to failure and 3 80% days (+1 deadlift day), and follow Mendes’ guidelines for back-offs (if you hit over 95% leave it there, 90% or so hit 3x2 at 10% less, <90% hit 3x3 around 15% less, or similar). I wouldn’t bench more than 2-3 times a week, but accessory work + OHP should definitely be added. To be honest, there’s no need to decrease your upper body hypertrophy type work much at all.

I don’t buy the volume argument Mike Tuscherer made, that excessive volume too soon will hinder long term progress, either. In fact, it seems that most successful advanced lifters train with less volume than they did when they were younger and still progress due to better muscle activation / efficiency / etc. I say this because I’ve seen the thread over on his site (that ChrisOttawa posted on) when googling for opinions, and I genuinely believe Mike doesn’t know what he’s talking about when it comes to this style of training. He even admits that he has no evidence and just assumes it to be true (that volume and frequency must be increased in elite lifters, and starting from an already high base will limit long-term progress), as he puts:-
“I have not been hit by a truck, but I can observe enough to know that it’s probably not a good idea. First hand experience is not needed”
"We know you have to increase the stress to continue adapting (overload principle). So if you intentionally adapt to the highest stresses you can in a short amount of time, what do you do when that stops working? Any other program you try would be “low volume” by comparison."
Of course, this is blatant garbage - the principle of overload applies to progressively-increasing RESISTANCE not volume, unless the goal is to achieve the greatest recovery capacity (??!!).

So, if you have sound technique and are not a complete beginner, jump right in and go for it. It will take a while to adapt to the workload, but you will progress.


#7

OP, here are two more versions of bulgarian training adapted to PL (just to give you more choice…or more paralysis by analysis):

John Broz’s

Day 1, 3, 5, 7: squat and bench to a max + back off (3x2 @90%), assistance (upper back, lats, prehab stuff)

Day 2, 4, 6: squat same as above, DL 6-10x3 @80%, assistance (same as above)

“Squat Nemesis” (it works for bench also):

  • from 70% do 3’s up to a 3RM, then 2’s up to a 2RM, then singles to a max; back off: get back to 70% and work up to a 3RM again, then 2x5 @50% (if you google Nemesis WOD, you’ll find many other ideas for back off). It’s better to make small jumps in weight (2.5%), since here you focus more on overall workload than on hitting a real 1RM.

I have progressed very well on both versions; I consider Squat Nemesis a very good intro to the real deal (Broz one).


#8

thx for all the great ansewers! i have thought about them all and read some more on the interwebb and been thinking all day.

this is what i came upp with:

monday: squat 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do a dubble,
Bench 4x3 85%, Dips 5x5 with 50kg, 5x5 speed pullups.

Thusday: highbar 2s paus squat beltless and no sbd´s (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do 3x2,
OHP 4x2 85%, 5x6 shoulder flyes,
beltless deadlift (heavy as i can go) take of 15% and do 3x2

wensday: squat 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do a dubble,
Bench 5x2 90%, slingshot 5x1 100%, bent over rows 5x5

thursday: box squat no sbd 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do 3x2,
Bench narrow grip 5x5 75%, OHP 5x5 75%

friday: squat 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do a dubble,
Deadlift 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do a dubble,
some backwork

how does it look? im worried about the volume on the deadlift is to low.


#9

[quote]halcj wrote:

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:
Look up Damien Pezzuti’s article on liftbigeatbig for an idea of how to start this. He recommends starting with 3 days a week and adding a light day once you stall, eventually turn that into another max-out day and then later add another light day and so on. I think the biggest mistake is jumping into this head first, especially if you are on a low frequency program right now. You should not be doing more total volume than in your current program, and maybe even less because the intensity will make up for it. I have tried this before and wasn’t able to keep it up, mostly from starting with too much volume and then getting shoulder/arm pain from frequent squatting. However, I know a guy who added about 40 lbs. to his squat and more than 50 to his deadlift (bench went nowhere) in 4 months. He actually reduce deadlift volume a lot, he had one speed deadlift day (which he eventually cut out) and another day where he worked up to a max triple never a max single) with no backoff work, his deadlift never went up so fast before. It might work for you, it might not, but if you are determined to do it then give it a try.

A few pieces of advice:
-minimize accessory work, just some rows/chins for shoulder health and curls if you are going to bench every day
-don’t do too much deadlift volume because it will be harder to recover from, your back will already be taking a beating. The squat volume should help your deadlift.
-consider using some squat variations like SSB, high bar, or front squat. A lot of people get shoulder issues from frequent low bar squatting, I only know of two elite lifters using this method, Pezzuti squats high bar and Tom Martin mostly does high bar in training. In fact, Greg Nuckols told me that he doesn’t do low bar squats at all when he does a daily squatting phase.[/quote]

I have to say, I disagree. Squatting to 80% 7 days a week is ridiculously easy - start with 3 max days to failure and 3 80% days (+1 deadlift day), and follow Mendes’ guidelines for back-offs (if you hit over 95% leave it there, 90% or so hit 3x2 at 10% less, <90% hit 3x3 around 15% less, or similar). I wouldn’t bench more than 2-3 times a week, but accessory work + OHP should definitely be added. To be honest, there’s no need to decrease your upper body hypertrophy type work much at all.

I don’t buy the volume argument Mike Tuscherer made, that excessive volume too soon will hinder long term progress, either. In fact, it seems that most successful advanced lifters train with less volume than they did when they were younger and still progress due to better muscle activation / efficiency / etc. I say this because I’ve seen the thread over on his site (that ChrisOttawa posted on) when googling for opinions, and I genuinely believe Mike doesn’t know what he’s talking about when it comes to this style of training. He even admits that he has no evidence and just assumes it to be true (that volume and frequency must be increased in elite lifters, and starting from an already high base will limit long-term progress), as he puts:-
“I have not been hit by a truck, but I can observe enough to know that it’s probably not a good idea. First hand experience is not needed”
"We know you have to increase the stress to continue adapting (overload principle). So if you intentionally adapt to the highest stresses you can in a short amount of time, what do you do when that stops working? Any other program you try would be “low volume” by comparison."
Of course, this is blatant garbage - the principle of overload applies to progressively-increasing RESISTANCE not volume, unless the goal is to achieve the greatest recovery capacity (??!!).

So, if you have sound technique and are not a complete beginner, jump right in and go for it. It will take a while to adapt to the workload, but you will progress.

[/quote]

“Squatting to 80% 7 days a week is ridiculously easy - start with 3 max days to failure and 3 80% days (+1 deadlift day)”

I think you misunderstood something, the idea is to start by maxing out 3x/week and add a light day when you stall, then eventually make that a max day as well and later add another day and so on. Your suggestion could work as well, but in my opinion it’s better to start with less and then add more rather than go all out and have to cut back. Mendes’ backoff guidelines are reasonable, but what do you think of squatting to failure every day? Personally, I found maxing out on bench every day to work better than maxing out on squats, of course everyone is different.

Now about Mike Tuchscherer’s idea of adapting to high volume, there is some truth to it. First of all, with his training system you do gradually increase volume over the longer term, just like Boris Sheiko would have you do. Ivan Abadjiev increased volume through frequency - you might train a particular lift 4-7x a week in the beginning, eventually you would have to do it multiple times a day to continue progress. However, there is a way around this. First of all, Greg Nuckols recommends using daily max squatting (with no down sets)and benching both as a peaking phase and to resensitize yourself to volume. Damien Pezzuti does volume/hypertrophy blocks here and there to continue making gains and add muscle mass. And finally if you look at Mike Israetel’s new book, he advises using hypertrophy phases with higher reps to avoid accommodation to low reps/heavier weight that you would use in your regular strength phases, and vice versa.

The moral of the story is that at some point you will have to either change the stimulus or increase the volume to continue progress. It’s true that overload in terms of weight is necessary to continue making gains, but work capacity increases you will have to increase either intensity or volume to see results. If you are already maxing out every day there is only one thing left to increase because you can’t hit PR’s every day. Sheiko has an interview on JTS, he says that you have to increase volume to a certain point, but once you can’t increase volume anymore you have to increase intensity. This applies to any sort of training. You know the Polish weightlifting team maxes out on squats 17X a week?


#10

[quote]Fjompe wrote:
thx for all the great ansewers! i have thought about them all and read some more on the interwebb and been thinking all day.

this is what i came upp with:

monday: squat 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do a dubble,
Bench 4x3 85%, Dips 5x5 with 50kg, 5x5 speed pullups.

Thusday: highbar 2s paus squat beltless and no sbd�?�´s (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do 3x2,
OHP 4x2 85%, 5x6 shoulder flyes,
beltless deadlift (heavy as i can go) take of 15% and do 3x2

wensday: squat 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do a dubble,
Bench 5x2 90%, slingshot 5x1 100%, bent over rows 5x5

thursday: box squat no sbd 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do 3x2,
Bench narrow grip 5x5 75%, OHP 5x5 75%

friday: squat 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do a dubble,
Deadlift 1x (heavy as i can go) take of 10% and do a dubble,
some backwork

how does it look? im worried about the volume on the deadlift is to low.
[/quote]
I would go to max on bench as well, but of course you can just do max squatting if you prefer. Don’t do so much assistance work though, it will affect your recovery. OHP once a week maybe, other stuff minimally. Your deadlift volume is higher than Pezzuti recommends, my friend added over 50lbs. in 4 months by deadlifting once a week to a max triple and no backoff sets, the max squatting will make up for the volume. Start with less, add more. You could start by squatting 6-7x a week but the backoff volume will probably catch up with you.


#11

IMO, it seems ridiculous to think anyone on here will max out on work capacity anytime soon. When we talk about maxing out on volume, it’s typically international elite athletes we’re referring to and not a normal person. I’m sure both programs can work. Also keep in mind that there’s always a difference in how far people push to failure. Yes a person can “max” out 17x a week but take a look at a top athlete’s technique and you likely won’t see technical failure. Whereas another person could push beyond technical failure and not train all the necessary muscles while also taking a huge hit on recovery.

From my experience, I have had to up my volume in order to compensate for inefficient technique. What halcj is getting at is that if a lifter is very efficient with technique, more muscles get trained to a higher degree which makes training more effective so more volume may not be needed. The normal way of analyzing volume is looking only at set/rep/weights but what’s more important is how much work each muscle is actually doing (which really can’t be determined since we don’t have the technology). That is why volume/intensity and programming is so individualized because we can’t compare an inefficient lifter to the top athletes in the sport or person A to person B. We can make guesses but have to keep in mind the margin for error.

Edit: My hypothesis is that an athlete using the least volume in comparison to athletes of similar strength level is probably one of the most technically proficient.


#12

[quote]lift206 wrote:
IMO, it seems ridiculous to think anyone on here will max out on work capacity anytime soon. When we talk about maxing out on volume, it’s typically international elite athletes we’re referring to and not a normal person. I’m sure both programs can work. Also keep in mind that there’s always a difference in how far people push to failure. Yes a person can “max” out 17x a week but take a look at a top athlete’s technique and you likely won’t see technical failure. Whereas another person could push beyond technical failure and not train all the necessary muscles while also taking a huge hit on recovery.

From my experience, I have had to up my volume in order to compensate for inefficient technique. What halcj is getting at is that if a lifter is very efficient with technique, more muscles get trained to a higher degree which makes training more effective so more volume may not be needed. The normal way of analyzing volume is look only at set/rep/weights but what’s more important is how much work each muscle is actually doing (which really can’t be determined since we don’t have the technology). That is why volume/intensity and programming is so individualized because we can’t compare an inefficient lifter to the top athletes in the sport or person A to person B.[/quote]

Unless you lift weights for a living you won’t be able to max out work capacity. The problem is that there are only so any hours in a day and only so many you can dedicate to lifting weights, and after a certain point you don’t want to be in the weight room anymore. I was recently training 6 days a week full body 2 hours+ and making small gains. Perhaps if I had done a hypertrophy phase for a month or so I wouldn’t have had to go to that extreme. I like lifting weights, but only to a certain point. So if you can prevent yourself from adapting to high volume then it’s definitely a good thing, otherwise it’s like working 80 hours for 25 hours pay. I think Mike T’s original concern was that people were actually going to be training like the Bulgarians - maxing out all day every day - and yeah, that’s not happening.

It seems to me that phase potentiation is the answer - do high rep/high volume/low weight blocks so that when you get back to your regular strength training it is a new stimulus to your system and you start making gains again. What do they say, insanity is doing the same thing a thousand times and expecting a different result? Pezzuti is only able to keep making gains with relatively low volume and frequency (not more than once a day) because he does hypertrophy blocks. Otherwise he would be living in a Bulgarian training camp by now.


#13

halcj, how long have you been training this way? What sort of changes have you made along the way?


#14

[quote]lift206 wrote:
My hypothesis is that an athlete using the least volume in comparison to athletes of similar strength level is probably one of the most technically proficient.[/quote]

I have to say I disagree. How much volume you need or can handle is very individual. Look at arramzy (Adam Ramzy), he is an elite lifter and trains with moderately high volume per session, but 5-6 days a week. Is his technique flawed? According to Sheiko, necessary levels of volume and intensity are largely dependant on your nervous system. The more excitable your CNS is, the less volume you need. I guess I need some excitement!


#15

Another thing, when I said Polish weightlifter were squatting to a max 17x/week, these aren’t beginners. They are elite lifters.


#16

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:
halcj, how long have you been training this way? What sort of changes have you made along the way?[/quote]

I’ve trained like this for a period of about 6-7 months in the past, true max almost every day (to failure), before switching it to 4 days and playing rugby too. I then suffered a back injury playing rugby, and took about 4-5 months off squatting, doing rehab work etc. and upper body work (at one point I was doing 5x5 with weight across 7 days a week on bench with raised legs, and my bench went from 130kg -> 160kg over two months).
My current stint of Bulgarian training has been going since April when rugby finished, and I plan to continue with it for the foreseeable future (with a submaximal daily single + hypertrophy phase as a deload after competing). I am progressing very well.
I haven’t had very good results with maxing bench in the past, and prefer more bodybuilding and volume work plus rep progressions most of the time. Still, if I stuck with it I’m sure it would work, I just find it too stressful overall on top of the squatting. My deadlift is flying up at the moment with one weekly session to a top weight (1, 2 or 3 reps) plus moderate back-offs. I also perform plenty of rowing movements with heavy weight (not barbell due to lower back fatigue), and conditioning work.
I haven’t been squatting to failure much recently due to the poor bars at my current gym (bending them through daily misses might annoy the gym staff) and the fact that I’m progressing anyway. Still, I think I tend to do better when I’m not worried about missing, so I might return to it if I can.


#17

I still maintain that volume can be REDUCED as a lifter advances, as heavier weights and better neuromuscular co-ordination allow more stress to be inflicted with each rep. I think a Westside setup (in terms of frequency) or a basic once every 4-7 days routine is MORE likely to be effective for a very advanced lifter. They don’t need more volume on the lifts, they need problem-solving and weak-point elimination. They may also benefit from time away from the standard lifts for recovery, and then a daily-max phase as their final 8 weeks of meet prep.


#18

Look at guys like Malanichev, Coan, Savickas, Sam Byrd, Andy Bolton, etc. All train once or twice a week. I know for a fact that Andy Bolton has used higher (though not daily) frequency programming extensively in the past, but at some point the weights will catch up and other methods become the best choices. Abadjiev and Broz have both said that heavier lifters or those who have more absolute weight on the bar require reduced volume and frequency - it’s all about degrees, but no one in their right mind would advocate ever-increasing volume or frequency.


#19

[quote]lift206 wrote:
IMO, it seems ridiculous to think anyone on here will max out on work capacity anytime soon. When we talk about maxing out on volume, it’s typically international elite athletes we’re referring to and not a normal person. I’m sure both programs can work. Also keep in mind that there’s always a difference in how far people push to failure. Yes a person can “max” out 17x a week but take a look at a top athlete’s technique and you likely won’t see technical failure. Whereas another person could push beyond technical failure and not train all the necessary muscles while also taking a huge hit on recovery.

From my experience, I have had to up my volume in order to compensate for inefficient technique. What halcj is getting at is that if a lifter is very efficient with technique, more muscles get trained to a higher degree which makes training more effective so more volume may not be needed. The normal way of analyzing volume is looking only at set/rep/weights but what’s more important is how much work each muscle is actually doing (which really can’t be determined since we don’t have the technology). That is why volume/intensity and programming is so individualized because we can’t compare an inefficient lifter to the top athletes in the sport or person A to person B. We can make guesses but have to keep in mind the margin for error.

Edit: My hypothesis is that an athlete using the least volume in comparison to athletes of similar strength level is probably one of the most technically proficient.[/quote]

Agreed almost 100%. Good post.


#20

[quote]chris_ottawa wrote:

[quote]lift206 wrote:
My hypothesis is that an athlete using the least volume in comparison to athletes of similar strength level is probably one of the most technically proficient.[/quote]

I have to say I disagree. How much volume you need or can handle is very individual. Look at arramzy (Adam Ramzy), he is an elite lifter and trains with moderately high volume per session, but 5-6 days a week. Is his technique flawed? According to Sheiko, necessary levels of volume and intensity are largely dependant on your nervous system. The more excitable your CNS is, the less volume you need. I guess I need some excitement![/quote]

Well my hypothesis wasn’t proven wrong since you didn’t find someone in the same weight class with the same total to use for comparing volume. He is one of the best lifters on this site and very accomplished. I’m certainly not taking anything away from him.

It’s not about exciting the CNS, it’s about firing as many muscle fibers as possible and having them work effectively together throughout the entire range of motion for that lift.

It would be nice if someone on this site around the 163 weight class (170 walking weight) with roughly a 1200 total can speak up. I’d like to compare the amount of volume we do. I have a feeling that I do more because up to this point, I have been very inefficient in the way I lift. My lifts sucked and I figured out one of the reasons why. Now it’s time to improve.

I didn’t intend to argue about this, just point out other reasons to consider and use myself as an example for being inefficient.