T Nation

The Body Weight Factor


Should a skinny newb interested in making the most gains possible ever work on getting his body weight up to aid in strength gains?

This is in regards to how a person views his goals…as in, will the guy with plans of really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room value from working on all out size and weight gain for a while?

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Should a skinny newb interested in making the most gains possible ever work on getting his body weight up to aid in strength gains?

This is in regards to how a person views his goals…as in, will the guy with plans of really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room value from working on all out size and weight gain for a while?[/quote]
If a skinny guy’s goals are “making the most gains possible” and “really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room”, then yes, they’ll have to focus on gaining bodyweight.

What exactly is the question?

The more specific someone can make their goals, the better. This makes hypothetical situations tricky, but I’d say it’s especially important for beginners. Do they want to weigh 220? Do they want to see a 4-pack? Do they want to squat 495? The best path towards those are going to be different.

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Should a skinny newb interested in making the most gains possible ever work on getting his body weight up to aid in strength gains?

This is in regards to how a person views his goals…as in, will the guy with plans of really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room value from working on all out size and weight gain for a while?[/quote]
If a skinny guy’s goals are “making the most gains possible” and “really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room”, then yes, they’ll have to focus on gaining bodyweight.

What exactly is the question?

The more specific someone can make their goals, the better. This makes hypothetical situations tricky, but I’d say it’s especially important for beginners. Do they want to weigh 220? Do they want to see a 4-pack? Do they want to squat 495? The best path towards those are going to be different.[/quote]

if someones goal is “really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room” then that person should try maturing rather than gaining weight or strength.

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
Do they want to weigh 220? Do they want to see a 4-pack? Do they want to squat 495? The best path towards those are going to be different.[/quote]

You can do those all at once

My personal experience.

I started out as a noob bulking from 175 to 220-225 lbs.

I can say I did not feel like I made progress or got stronger from it until I shed the weight and learned how to train instead of trying to increase my numbers every time I was in the weight room. I also really didn’t know how much I was eating until I was tracking my macros and feel I would of made more progress had I learned how to earlier.

I feel my bulk would have been more successful had I gotten those two factors down first but wonder if I would of really have made more progress by all out bulking or taking it more reasonably and cycling between 10 and 15 percent bodyfat.

Also my goals are more modest than yours, this being a physique I aspire to.

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]Professor X wrote:
if someones goal is “really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room” then that person should try maturing rather than gaining weight or strength.[/quote]

lol

or stop using deodorant

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

If a skinny guy’s goals are “making the most gains possible” and “really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room”, then yes, they’ll have to focus on gaining bodyweight.

What exactly is the question?

[/quote]

Exactly that. I see many posts telling people to avoid the scale or to ignore the weight and just look in the mirror.

I am just making it clear that yes, working on gaining body weight should be a goal in itself along with making sure most of it is muscle. There seem to be some who make anything much over 200lbs lately seem like nothing but fat gain.

I am asking for those who got big to speak up on how they did it also.

[quote]

The more specific someone can make their goals, the better. This makes hypothetical situations tricky, but I’d say it’s especially important for beginners. Do they want to weigh 220? Do they want to see a 4-pack? Do they want to squat 495? The best path towards those are going to be different.[/quote]

Exactly…and deciding what those goals are is what this is about.

I could see a newb being confused by some statements lately as if there are only two goals…lean and ripped or fat. The truth is, individual goals are not that black and white.

With that in mind, someone setting out to “see a 4 pack” would be approaching this wrong. I don’t have that as a goal. My goal will be to get leaner than I am now…but these are short term goals all leading to the end result.

That is why I didn’t like how people were representing the “full house” look or anyone who said they were ok with that.

I am only ok with that at times…and that is a decision based off of years of serious training where I know what condition I progress the most in. I don’t think anyone is recommending someone accept a certain body fat percentage aside from what they feel most comfortable at and see the most progress at.

This is exactly what I did…per the advice of the infamous Prof X, due to his “Ask Prof X” thread.

I started off a skinny 155lbs.

I bulked up to a “fat” 230.

I was able to develop a shit ton of strength, that I feel I would have never gained, had I tried to gain slowly and keep the bodyfat at a minimum. I would eat an entire pizza, and that would allow me to train for 2 hours, with relatively “heavy” weights, than most of my friends who would burn out after an hour eating “healthy” food.

I was able to deadlift 5 plates, squat almost 4, bench 3, and push 100’s+ on pressing exercises, among others. (this is not to brag, but to say that I believe I achieved this strength STRICTLY because of the food)

I am now down to 200.

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
if someones goal is “really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room” then that person should try maturing rather than gaining weight or strength. [/quote]
Ha, yeah there’s that too.

[quote]yolo84 wrote:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
Do they want to weigh 220? Do they want to see a 4-pack? Do they want to squat 495? The best path towards those are going to be different.[/quote]
You can do those all at once[/quote]
Eventually, sure, but absolutely not “all at once”.

A 6’2", 170-pound, skinny-but-not-lean guy who’s never stepped foot in a gym before will have to prioritize those goals in order to figure out a plan that maximizes progress and allows “the most gains possible.”

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
if someones goal is “really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room” then that person should try maturing rather than gaining weight or strength. [/quote]
Ha, yeah there’s that too.
[/quote]

LOL. How is that goal any less relevant than the guys trying to impress the girl or win a plastic trophy?

Uh, yeah…my goal was to be big enough for people to notice. Not sure why that means “immaturity”…but hey, I would rather be more child like in how I view the world if it means I reach my goals.

if you were mature, you would understand why : )

(sorry, too good an opportunity to miss)

X, why even make this thread? It doesn’t matter WHAT someone with a differing opinion than yours says. You’ll argue till you are blue in the face it’s wrong. You didn’t make this thread to have a discussion, rather continue to rattle off what everybody has heard already.

Maybe if you had something new to say, it would (could) be a good thread.

EVERYBODY here know how you feel. So why fucking bother other than to continue to raise your post count?

In b4 “whateva, whateva, I do what I want!”

For a skinny newb, I’d have them learn to train and learn to eat right.

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
For a skinny newb, I’d have them learn to train and learn to eat right.[/quote]

Interesting.

What is “training right” and

what is “eating right”?

Shouldn’t their goals be the first thing looked at?

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
if you were mature, you would understand why : )

(sorry, too good an opportunity to miss) [/quote]

That’s cute…but it doesn’t answer the question.

Why is one goal seen as “immature” and your own goal is not?

What is your goal by the way?

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
For a skinny newb, I’d have them learn to train and learn to eat right.[/quote]

Interesting.

What is “training right” and

what is “eating right”?

Shouldn’t their goals be the first thing looked at?[/quote]

So obvious all you want to do is argue. You listed the goals for the newbs in your first post, champ.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
-a skinny newb interested in making the most gains possible-[/quote]

[quote]cueball wrote:
X, why even make this thread?
[/quote]

Because the goals of the individual are the primary thing that should be looked at…and from there the approach is discovered…not the other way around.

I personally felt that needed discussion.

If you don’t, I am sure this thread will not miss you.

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
if you were mature, you would understand why : )

(sorry, too good an opportunity to miss) [/quote]

That’s cute…but it doesn’t answer the question.

Why is one goal seen as “immature” and your own goal is not?

What is your goal by the way?[/quote]

thanks

I think most adults would consider that to impress a roomfull of people with one’s wit, charm, intelligence, charisma, style, morality, ethics is mature.

to try to impress a roomfull of people with ones size is not. how big one is is not that impressive to most people.

my goal is to be fit, strong, healthy, flexible well into my dotage (and to continue being witty/charming/intelligent/charismatic/stylish/moral/and ethical of course)

[quote]Professor X wrote:
I am just making it clear that yes, working on gaining body weight should be a goal in itself along with making sure most of it is muscle.[/quote]
Bodyweight gain is going to coincide with most appearance-based goals. The majority of the time, a lifter will have to gain weight (at least temporarily) in order to end up looking better, whatever “looking better” means to them.

If that 6’2" 170-pound guy wants to end up looking like Vin Diesel, I’d make it clear that he’s really looking to add 40+ pounds in the long-term. That’s definitely an eye-opening surprise to most newbs. If he wanted to end up looking like Jason Statham or some random slightly-smaller dude, he might end up in the lean 170-180 range, after being closer to 190-200 for a while.

If I follow this right, I think I kind of agree with this, but talking about individual goals in a thread where we’re using hypothetical examples is, as I said, tricky. Especially if this thread is supposed to be a semi-response to, or inspired by, comments in another thread.

[quote]Professor X wrote:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
if someones goal is “really making people move out of the way when he walks in a room” then that person should try maturing rather than gaining weight or strength. [/quote]
Ha, yeah there’s that too.[/quote]
Uh, yeah…my goal was to be big enough for people to notice. Not sure why that means “immaturity”…but hey, I would rather be more child like in how I view the world if it means I reach my goals.[/quote]
If that’s the driving goal, the one reason that made someone finally buy a gym membership and start training consistently, then yes, I’m comfortable saying that’s not an attitude I’d expect from a grown adult. If “clear the way, Roadblock’s comin’ through” was hoped for as a “side effect” from training, that’s a different thing.