T Nation

The Best Overhead Press?

Standing shoulder presses vs. sitting shoulder presses vs. push presses…etc

the argument of the best compound shoulder movement(s).
lets hear everyone’s opinion on what they think is the best, why, specific variations for more improvement so on and so forth.

Standing-hits the core more as well as other bodyparts.

Sitting-you can focus solely on your shoulders.

Standing allows you to use your legs (push press) to get an extra rep or two.

I’ve always done standing. I do tend to lean back a little bit, though. I, however, don’t think that this activates my chest because the weight ratio of the lift in comparison to both my incline bench and flat bench is in general proportions.

I agree with Fulmen about sitting focusing more on shoulders. Everything below your shoulders is significantly more relaxed because your core isn’t involved in the lift anymore.

I happened to do both today on dummbell presses. I got 80’s on seated and then repped out 60’s on standing. Fulmen is right about the core being hit hard on standing version.

I think sitting is better from bodybuilding stand point standing more for strength.

I sit when I use dumbells while stand when I use barbells. Sitting w/ dumbells hits my shoulders better while standing w/ a barbell makes me stronger faster.

It is interesting to see the gross disparity between sitting and standing shoulder presses. If looking soley for shoulder size though, sitting is quite a bit better I would say, but I dont like doing a program without a standing shoulder press of some type because I want my body to work.

[quote]Shadowzz4 wrote:
It is interesting to see the gross disparity between sitting and standing shoulder presses. If looking soley for shoulder size though, sitting is quite a bit better I would say, but I dont like doing a program without a standing shoulder press of some type because I want my body to work.[/quote]

If your body doesn’t work just because you do seated presses then you got a shitty routine.

The Olympic Press is the Best Overhead Pressing Movement. It works the most muscle mass and, if done properly, moves the most weight. After reading starting strength I’m convinced it’s the safest Press of any Sort.

But Variety is the Spice of Life.
Seated Presses put more work on the shoulders.

Arnold Presses have a greater ROM and arguably
hit the most muscle fibers in the shoulder.

Alternating Dumbbell Presses demand even more stability than the normal Press.

The Push-Press allows more weight to be used and more reps can be done in less time.

Good Shoulder Press Machines like the ones made by Hammer Strength are great for flushing the muscles with blood while still using heavier weights than one would use for Dumbbell Lateral Raises.

IMO the best Overhead Press after the Olympic Press is the Grappler Press. Use a Grapper, Landmine, or just throw a bar in a corner. Put 1/2 the plate weight you’d use for a Standing Press and then press that end of the bar. If you tend to over-arch while Pressing or you just want something new then this is a good exercise that I only see Dave Tate and CT doing.

[quote]FightingScott wrote:

IMO the best Overhead Press after the Olympic Press is the Grappler Press. Use a Grapper, Landmine, or just throw a bar in a corner. Put 1/2 the plate weight you’d use for a Standing Press and then press that end of the bar. If you tend to over-arch while Pressing or you just want something new then this is a good exercise that I only see Dave Tate and CT doing.[/quote]

i remember reading about this. I used it for a while when coming off of my collar bone injury from rugby. I found it very useful in working the shoulder without bothering my collar bone which every other pressing movement would. This thread doing pretty good…lets keep it going

Seated Arnold Dumbbell Presses for size, ftw.

I’ll be the first to say it… 12" log press. Standing, of course, with plenty of leg drive and a dip, if you can manage it.

seated, because even though I use less weight my shoulders get sorer

I prefer using the standing press regularly, and sometimes doing it seated for a few weeks to get some variation and get used to heavier weights.
How about handstand pushups? Anyone here does these?

I’ve only done seated db military presses. I want to try it with a barbell however I’m worried about my form. How low should you bring the bar in front of your face?

[quote]Fulmen wrote:
Shadowzz4 wrote:
It is interesting to see the gross disparity between sitting and standing shoulder presses. If looking soley for shoulder size though, sitting is quite a bit better I would say, but I dont like doing a program without a standing shoulder press of some type because I want my body to work.

If your body doesn’t work just because you do seated presses then you got a shitty routine.

[/quote]

Are you serious? Go look at people that have built up ridiculous poundages in seated shoulder presses and see what they can standing press. Dont get offended because your a pussy and you cant standing shoulder press.

Best result I have ever gotten are from heavy full range standing press (or military press).

It’s a full shoulder exercise (except for the rear-delt maybe). But it’s often done wrong. Many people do a seated press behind the neck instead because they can’t clear the bar over their head properly. They use too narrow grip resulting in too much triceps involvement and not enough delt involvement.

The trick is to push the bar up and back a few inches (after the bar is above your head obviously) so it is lined up with your spine. This will make you in a tremendously stronger position and will bring the side delt a lot more into play.

It’s a tremendous exercise and I often feel it in my upper back as well after I am done.

I never liked the behind the neck press because of the limited range of motion and shoulder discomfort. Some machines are good, but they often have poor range of motion or a crappy strength curve. Dumbbell presses (seated or standing) are good too, but they become awkward past a certain weight.

Oddly enough my shoulders have been growing from my doing a lot of Olympic style lifting. Cleaning the weight into position with push presses to get it moving upwards…I do worry about the arching to get the weight past my face but I’ve managed some good results.

[quote]goya wrote:
Best result I have ever gotten are from heavy full range standing press (or military press).

It’s a full shoulder exercise (except for the rear-delt maybe). But it’s often done wrong. Many people do a seated press behind the neck instead because they can’t clear the bar over their head properly. They use too narrow grip resulting in too much triceps involvement and not enough delt involvement.

The trick is to push the bar up and back a few inches (after the bar is above your head obviously) so it is lined up with your spine. This will make you in a tremendously stronger position and will bring the side delt a lot more into play.

It’s a tremendous exercise and I often feel it in my upper back as well after I am done.

I never liked the behind the neck press because of the limited range of motion and shoulder discomfort. Some machines are good, but they often have poor range of motion or a crappy strength curve. Dumbbell presses (seated or standing) are good too, but they become awkward past a certain weight.

[/quote]

hit the nail on the head…