T Nation

The 'Add Weight Next Workout' Thing


#1

Alright, let's say I'm using a 1RM percentage based system and on my last set I'm going for 8 reps, and once I'm able to get all 8, I'm supposed to add weight.

Am I understanding correctly that this means adding 5-10 lbs to my projected 1RM, and basing my reps on this new weight going forward, or does it mean to add that weight to successive sets ( if last Monday's bench press for final set of 8 was 200, then next Monday would be 205-210 )?


#2

[quote]USNS physique wrote:
Am I understanding correctly that this means adding 5-10 lbs to my projected 1RM, and basing my reps on this new weight going forward[/quote]
Nope. Unless your program specifically says to, you don’t adjust the training max and recalculate the math for each new training session. That’s nutty.

Yep. “Add weight next workout” generally means “put more weight on the bar that you’re about to lift.”


#3

Won’t adding weight to sets the next session’s rep ranges then be an inaccurate measure of my 1 RM, and make following such a system impossible? Doesn’t the added weight upon hitting target reps completely throw off the percentages? So, if I’m doing 80 percent 1RM on the last set for 8, next time I add 5lbs and suddenly it becomes NOT 80 percent? This is what’s confusing me.


#4

You are mixing two philosophies. That is why the confusion.


#5

[quote]USNS physique wrote:
Won’t adding weight to sets the next session’s rep ranges then be an inaccurate measure of my 1 RM, and make following such a system impossible? Doesn’t the added weight upon hitting target reps completely throw off the percentages? So, if I’m doing 80 percent 1RM on the last set for 8, next time I add 5lbs and suddenly it becomes NOT 80 percent? This is what’s confusing me. [/quote]
IF you are following a program, do what the program calls for. IF you are doing your own programming, do whatever you choose. In the grand scheme of things, add weight to the bar and lift. Then eat and rest, then add weight to the bar and lift. If you are having a difficult time grasping this concept, then follow a proven program that has very specific progression details.


#6

[quote]USNS physique wrote:
Won’t adding weight to sets the next session’s rep ranges then be an inaccurate measure of my 1 RM, and make following such a system impossible? Doesn’t the added weight upon hitting target reps completely throw off the percentages? So, if I’m doing 80 percent 1RM on the last set for 8, next time I add 5lbs and suddenly it becomes NOT 80 percent? This is what’s confusing me. [/quote]
Yeah, like JFG said, I think you’re just tripping yourself up. That’s probably either due to overthinking or just a poorly written explanation of the routine.

What’s the name of the program and the coach who wrote it?


#7

Warm up: 1 x 20 reps: 30% of your max;
Set one: 1 x 8 reps: 45% of your max;
Set two: 1 x 8 reps: 60% of your max;
Set three: 1 x 6 reps: 70% of your max;
Set four: 1 x 6 reps: 80% of your max;

Add weight once you can hit 8 reps on last set. It’s the one from the criticalbench site.


#8

[quote]USNS physique wrote:
Warm up: 1 x 20 reps : 60 pounds or 30% of your max;
Set one: 1 x 8 reps: 95 pounds or 45% of your max;
Set two: 1 x 8 reps: 125 pounds or 60% of your max;
Set three: 1 x 6 reps: 145 pounds or 70% of your max;
Set four: 1 x 6 reps: 165 pounds or 80% of your max;

Add weight once you can hit 8 reps on last set.[/quote]
I just Googled and came up with “How to Increase Your Bench Press by Blake Bissaillion”.

It very clearly states: “Now, when do you know it’s time to increase the weight? You should be increasing your weight when you can do the last set for 8 reps. So, in this case, if this person can do 165 pounds for 8 reps, they should increase the weight by 10%. Let’s say, this person does 8 reps with 165 pounds this week, next week, they will be using roughly 180 pounds for a target of 6 reps. Once they do 6 reps with 180 pounds, they will target 8 reps the following week, and so on.”

So, yeah, the confusion was entirely your fault. And after spending 9 and a half years on this site, that’s kind of an achievement. So, consider the percentages just a starting point for week one. After that first week… you add weight to the bar if/when you get the extra reps. That’s not the same as adding weight “next workout”, it could take 2-3 weeks depending on a few things.


#9

So I’ll do 12 weeks then test for a new 1RM, and get the new percentages and whatnot and then plug the new numbers into that template then repeat.


#10

[quote]USNS physique wrote:
So I’ll do 12 weeks then test for a new 1RM, and get the new percentages and whatnot and then plug the new numbers into that template then repeat.[/quote]
No.

“Only do a single repetition after 10 to 12 weeks of doing this kind of program. And after 12 weeks of this kind of regiment, take a two week break. This is vitally important. No body builder or power lifter in their right mind goes 100% intensity, 12 months out of the year. They do this in cycles and itâ??s what you going to do, so take a two week break from the gym after training 12 weeks.

After 10 weeks or so of the strength cycle, try and do a singe rep in the bench press. If you have done things right, you will have at least added 20 pounds to your bench. Remember, no single reps until after the 10th or 12th week.

After the 12th week, take a two week break. The only exception to this rule is if you are on an absolute roll. That is, if your bench press is absolutely busting out and your getting very strong, keep on doing what your doing. However, the threshold is soon approaching and I would say, your pushing it at 14 or 15 weeks of heavy training. Stop and take a break because you will venture into injury territory and if you donâ??t stop, injuries will happen. So, take a 2 week break, show off your newly earned muscles and donâ??t even think about stepping into the gym until your body is fully recovered- Generally two weeks.”


#11

[quote]USNS physique wrote:
So I’ll do 12 weeks then test for a new 1RM, and get the new percentages and whatnot and then plug the new numbers into that template then repeat.[/quote]

Or just add 10%, as mentioned above…once you reach the 6 reps…

Why are you complicating a simple program?


#12

Yeah, I know. I’m saying when I actually start up again after the deload.


#13

Because unless I test at 12 weeks to get my new 1 RM, I won’t be able to follow the 30/45/60/70/80 template using that new max.


#14

[quote]USNS physique wrote:
Because unless I test at 12 weeks to get my new 1 RM, I won’t be able to follow the 30/45/60/70/80 template using that new max.[/quote]

Just figure out your 1RM from your reps. Most of the calculators I’ve used online are close enough when I compare my AMRAP sets to my actual 1RM performance (which, I may add, I no longer incorporate into my training).

Or just use Wendler’s formula.

I like 1RM dick measuring as much as the next barbell enthusiast, but there are other ways to get stronger and run programs that use a 1RM to calculate training weights.


#15

Wow, is this whole “adding weight to the bar” thing really that difficult?


#16

I always knew 3rd grade math was holding me back from becoming bigger and stronger!