Testosterone Levels Dropping Drastically In Young Men

A drop of one third in 15 years (average 600 to 400?). That’s kind of scary.

Environmental factors?
Phytoestrogens/xenoestrogens?
Obesity?
Lack of sleep?
All of the above?

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Evolution. Kind of like “all of the above” but not in a bad sense.
Testosterone is a hormone that is also making men bigger, stronger, more aggressive and more competitive. These are traits that modern, rich world(people who have roofs over their head every night) that are not needed, so our bodies adapt.
I would like to see where these tests were done because i would be inclined to believe that in places like all the -stans (Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan etc) do not have this problem as the society is not living better and easier each year, so the men dont get a chance to be weaker.

Lately i start to believe that women are the stronger gender, and they will be the alpha gender of western civilisation. Ever since they got a few rights in their life, women have improved like crazy and men have just dove deeper in Onlyfans and degradation.

There was this study about types of men who are in demand and it kind of said that in rich countries like Sweden and Finland, women chose feminine men for their partners because they want a second mom for the children instead of alpha male who will be fucking around and doing stupid shit.
Alpha genes mean health and safety, but in an environment where women make more money, and health issues can be fixed in a hospital, the need for alpha male is reducing.
That probably is the reason why evolution does its thing and just does not produce as much “angry juice”. Cuz we dont need it.
Good world make weak men. Weak men make hard times. Hard times make hard men. Hard men make world a better place and the circle goes around.

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@tareload nailed it. Obesity… I mean we truly are a bunch of fat fu##s in this country. Just look around you.

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I tend to agree. I think the largest (pun intended) factor is how fat we have gotten on average.

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Lack of sleep, lack of exercise, overall fatassedness, and probably estrogens in the water supply.

I think these are all strong contributors - we are too comfortable as a nation.

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replace “high fat diet” term in Fig. 2 with “high fat/high carb diet” above.

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I would guess so. It’s probably a combination of factors

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Cause or effect though?

i 100% believe its a orchestrated cultural attack on western men, most women are now celebrated on having the characteristics of shit men.

Social engineering and the absolute trash that we are fed is destroying us mentally and physically.
I believe strength training is one of the only things keeping men together and inspiring masculine traits and goals.
And it all comes from one source.

Good take. In modern society there is no need to be “alpha” to live and reproduce (one could even argue that in today’s climate you’re better off being flabby and low T to navigate cancel culture and “toxic masculinity”). Men use cars and paychecks to attract mates, and can survive without ever doing anything close to strenuous physical activity.

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Young men, having limited exposure to testosterone until reaching puberty, would have a hard time saying “I’m fat because I’ve got low T” when they’ve only had T for like 2-3 years. Chances are they’ve been tubby fucks for a while… my money’s on Obesity-Induced Hypogonadism.

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I have noticed that elementary kids are much fatter now. We had like one fat kid per class growing up. Now there is one skinny kid. Hyperbole, but I do think young kids have gotten fat and sedentary since I was a kid in the 90s.

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Bad food and video games. All the young guys at work eat like sh**, have no care in the world about what they eat. They are kind of lazy as well.

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Likely the junk food, youtube, TikTok, insta and video games too.

Something that bolsters the case for cause rather than effect is the fact that elite athletes don’t necessarily have high testosterone. Im sure I read a paper a while back that documented elite sprinters often having average guy T levels and they obviously are not fat. Nurture over nature in the us case I’d say. We are largely products of our environment.

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:face_with_raised_eyebrow:

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I think hard training can lower T levels. Also, sprinters in particular have to be quite lean to be competitive. Too low of body fat can lower T, kinda like too high of fat can.

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The findings show that the dynamics and degree of suppression of gonadotropins during application of TU is determined in a multifactorial fashion. Minor variables contributing to interindividual differences in suppressability include baseline gonadotropin levels and age. Body fat content is a major determinant because it influences pharmacokinetics of TU via dose effects and potentially, resorption of T from the injection site. In addition, we found evidence that high body fat content slightly decreases the general responsiveness of the gonadotropic axis. Under the study conditions selected, modulatory influences of the CAG-repeat polymorphism in the AR gene were not detectable. However, these findings do not exclude such effects. They could be obscured by stronger influencing factors, such as dose and pharmacokinetics and the limited number of subjects studied.

Finally, bariatric surgery normalized BMI, TG, HOMA-IR, T, SHBG, and FSH values in the prospective part of our study. Our findings are consistent with previously reported data, which found improved BMI and T levels in men after bariatric surgery together with a restored sexual function and fertility. In accordance with previous studies, we found no changes in LH levels before and after surgery. Despite the use of the dialysis method, we found no changes in free T levels after GBS, in contrast to studies that used less precise methods such as calculated free T from total T [15, 53, 54]. This may suggest that a change in SHBG is mainly responsible for the increase in T, instead of recovery of the initial causative factors. Another explanation is the limited number of patients willing to participate in the follow-up part of the study, which could affect the detection of small changes. Longitudinal studies on a larger scale are needed to confirm these results. Recently, when bariatric surgery in hypogonadal subjects was compared to eugonadal men however, increase in (free) T levels after surgery had only been observed in hypogonadal men in combination with a more pronounced reduction in waist circumference (a marker of abdominal adiposity of these men). Furthermore, this study showed lower E2 levels at baseline in hypogonadal versus eugonadal obese men, also minimizing its role as a determinant of T levels in obese men [54].

The present study has the benefit of LC–MS/MS methods to determine T levels compared to previous commercial radioimmunoassay kits, leading to more reliable results, though larger studies are needed to confirm the findings. Another limitation of this study is the lack of information on adipose tissue aromatase activity in addition to the expression analysis, because SAT samples were frozen or fixated.

In conclusion, low T levels in obese men inversely associate with SAT cell size, HOMA-IR, and TG levels and not with adipose tissue aromatase expression, suggesting obesity-related metabolic disturbances to be more important for explaining the T levels in obese men. Further research should be directed at primary T secretion failure of the testis.

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