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Testing CNS Recovery?

Is there any way to test CNS recovery other than drop in athletic ability?

I remember reading on here something like when you wake up, squeeze a gripper (coc thing) and if you can squeeze it easily, your CNS is primed… if you can close it, your CNS is fine, and if you cant close it, your CNS still has some recovering to do.

[quote]sciencewolverine wrote:
Is there any way to test CNS recovery other than drop in athletic ability?[/quote]

Considering that CNS fatigue is poorly defined and understood and possibly misnamed, the only methods you’ll find effective are athletic tests. One method is to test vertical jump before a workout to see whether an athlete is ready to perform. The downside is that you need an accurate vertical leap tester and they aren’t cheap.

I doubt both of the above methods.

There was an article or an author’s post a while back about counting how many steps an athlete was able to take in a certain time period while running in place. They also talked about doing a tap test on a keyboard also testing CNS recovery.

[quote]Smitty88 wrote:
I doubt both of the above methods.[/quote]

Good point?? Why?

You could do the “tap test” as described by Dan John. Do a search and it should come up easily.

Cheers,
Pat

I remember a couple of the authors on this site talking about very simple tests, like how many times you can tap the space bar in 10 seconds with your index finger.

I have no background info on this or how applicable it is, just thought I’d throw it out there.

[quote]Smitty88 wrote:
I doubt both of the above methods.[/quote]

Thats nice. Why? and whats your brilliant method?

[quote]Bauer97 wrote:
I remember a couple of the authors on this site talking about very simple tests, like how many times you can tap the space bar in 10 seconds with your index finger.

I have no background info on this or how applicable it is, just thought I’d throw it out there.[/quote]

I also know nothing of the vailidity or science of the tests like tapping and squeezing, but I feel they work to a degree, at least for me.

Most of my life, when I first wake up, I have had trouble squeezing my hand closed for a tight fist and I know I am not ready for any kind of lifting immediately upon rising. I would think this is somewhat related to the CNS being primed.

Then again, what do I know…?

[quote]rrjc5488 wrote:
I remember reading on here something like when you wake up, squeeze a gripper (coc thing) and if you can squeeze it easily, your CNS is primed… if you can close it, your CNS is fine, and if you cant close it, your CNS still has some recovering to do.

[/quote]

I believe James Smith said a while back that he’s going to spend a few months recording this with his athletes and seeing the correlation it had to training performance. We’ll see if he mentions anything about this in the next couple of months.

[quote]rrjc5488 wrote:
Smitty88 wrote:
I doubt both of the above methods.

Thats nice. Why? and whats your brilliant method?[/quote]

I have no method.

I know it’s difficult for you to wrap your mind around but I don’t think we know enough about exercise and the CNS to actually have a method.

There are plenty of things that we just don’t understand yet, much less have a “method” to deal with.

[quote]jtrinsey wrote:
rrjc5488 wrote:
I remember reading on here something like when you wake up, squeeze a gripper (coc thing) and if you can squeeze it easily, your CNS is primed… if you can close it, your CNS is fine, and if you cant close it, your CNS still has some recovering to do.

I believe James Smith said a while back that he’s going to spend a few months recording this with his athletes and seeing the correlation it had to training performance. We’ll see if he mentions anything about this in the next couple of months.
[/quote]

That should be interesting. We need many more of these types of experiments in order to help us figure out the effects on the CNS.