T Nation

Testing 1RM & Lifting Pace

I recall Bill Roberts stating in another thread related to 1 rep max testing, that you don’t have to perform a 1 RM on any given exercise at all to find out what your 1RM weight is within a given exercise. He suggested that if you wanted or needed to find out your 1 RM on a given exercise, then you can either perform your 5 RM and use 125% of that value as your estimated 1 RM value or perform your 3 RM and use 110% of that value as your estimated 1RM value. However, if one were to perform either a 5RM or 3RM for the purpose of finding one’s 1RM, then exactly what kind of tempo should either RM be executed with?

Say you were to deadlift. Take your 3RM weight. Now approach it like it was your 1RM. That means, yea huffing and puffing building up all that adrenaline and try to kill the bar. Reset after each rep as if it was a 1RM single. Put all the effort into each rep, its 3 singles not 3 reps. Don’t cheat yourself out of the boost of getting hyped. That should be a pretty good estimation of your 1RM

Why don’t you use the most accurate means of testing and just go for a single. Get in a rack, one or two spotters, and then take a few days off to recover and then start your new training cycle.

The way I’ve always used is… (number of reps x weight on the bar x 3%) + weight on the bar = estimated 1RM.

Example. I deadlifted 180kg for 5 reps. (5 x 180 x .0333) + 180 = 210

It seems pretty accurate for me at least.

[quote]Bull_Scientist wrote:
I recall Bill Roberts stating in another thread related to 1 rep max testing, that you don’t have to perform a 1 RM on any given exercise at all to find out what your 1RM weight is within a given exercise. He suggested that if you wanted or needed to find out your 1 RM on a given exercise, then you can either perform your 5 RM and use 125% of that value as your estimated 1 RM value or perform your 3 RM and use 110% of that value as your estimated 1RM value. However, if one were to perform either a 5RM or 3RM for the purpose of finding one’s 1RM, then exactly what kind of tempo should either RM be executed with? [/quote]
I have heard that if you take into account Jupiter’s position in relationship to Earth in light years and divide that by Pi plus the weight you’re lifting divided by reps you will get a perfect estimate of 1RM.

Or you could just perform your 1RM as an estimate is still only an estimate.

[quote]JLone wrote:
I have heard that if you take into account Jupiter’s position in relationship to Earth in light years and divide that by Pi plus the weight you’re lifting divided by reps you will get a perfect estimate of 1RM.

Or you could just perform your 1RM as an estimate is still only an estimate.
[/quote]

lmao

[quote]Reed wrote:
Why don’t you use the most accurate means of testing and just go for a single. Get in a rack, one or two spotters, and then take a few days off to recover and then start your new training cycle.[/quote]

Personally, I believe it’s safer to do a 5RM or 3RM than a 1 RM, because lifting a 5RM to 3RM is obviously not as heavy and as taxing as perform 1RM is.

My experience with rep calculators is that they are not very accurate. Or they may be accurate for one lift but not the others. That being said, there’s nothing wrong with guestimating for a program like 531 and blasting through whatever numbers you dial in.

Why do you want to know what your 1RM is? That should tell you how to get it.

If you’re trying to measure progress, then I think a calculator can be just fine. It may not accurately measure what your 1RM is, but if the estimate is going up, you’re making progress.

If you’re trying to get a number to start a new program, the program probably tells you how to start.

If you want to compete, then compete and see what your 1RM is.

If you want to brag about it, everyone will give you a different definition of what is legitimate.

[quote]Bull_Scientist wrote:

[quote]Reed wrote:
Why don’t you use the most accurate means of testing and just go for a single. Get in a rack, one or two spotters, and then take a few days off to recover and then start your new training cycle.[/quote]
Personally, I believe it’s safer to do a 5RM or 3RM than a 1 RM, because lifting a 5RM to 3RM is obviously not as heavy and as taxing as perform 1RM is.
[/quote]
Personally, I think you’re right.

[quote]Bull_Scientist wrote:

[quote]Reed wrote:
Why don’t you use the most accurate means of testing and just go for a single. Get in a rack, one or two spotters, and then take a few days off to recover and then start your new training cycle.[/quote]

Personally, I believe it’s safer to do a 5RM or 3RM than a 1 RM, because lifting a 5RM to 3RM is obviously not as heavy and as taxing as perform 1RM is.
[/quote]

Maybe before its no where near as accurate. If you squat 300 for 5 and a calculator says you squat 350 and you then say you,squat 350 but you have never gotten under it your a liar in my opinion. If you wanna know your 1rm then you need to test your rep max.

Also just a thought not lifting weights is safer and less stressful than a even a 10rm.