T Nation

Technology in Protein Formulas

So what kind of effect has the temperature in the protein treatment on the quality of its use?

Are there any differences in the CFM treatment among the individual companies on the market?

What doest the “spray drying technology” stand for? How does it actually work? Can you explain into detail? It is used quite frequently so I d like to know what it actually

[quote]Razor?s Edge wrote:
So what kind of effect has the temperature in the protein treatment on the quality of its use?

Are there any differences in the CFM treatment among the individual companies on the market?

What doest the “spray drying technology” stand for? How does it actually work? Can you explain into detail? It is used quite frequently so I d like to know what it actually[/quote]

Temperature: I assume your question is specific to ready-to-drink shakes/beverages, as opposed to protein powders? That’s typically where this question arises…primarily b/c a certain supplement company, about 2 years ago, launched what would eventually fail as a protein drink, but w/in its short life used the marketing angle that heating protein renders it useless.

Don’t know about you, but at some point between the cows udder and a protein making its way to my protein supplement, I’d like to have some assurances that the potentially dangerous bacteria strains have been killed (such is the reason behind heating). Certain types of proteins hold up better under the necessary heat, whereas there are also several methods available today to ensure that certain bacterias get whacked, yet not all of them having to be via classic pasteurization methodolgy.

CFM: Cross-flow microfiltration is all relatively the same, w/ the major differences potentially being membrane size (i.e. the filter works like a seive, so as the particles flow over it in a tangential rate, the pore size w/in the filter/membrane is the determining factor in particle size that is filtered out), and maybe the membrane material used (ex: teflon, plastic, etc).

There’s an obvious and constant particle size inherent in the functional aspects of a good protein that one would want to maintain, and thus, from my experience, there’s not really any noticeable difference b/w one CFM protein and another, assuming the protein supplier for each respective protein raw material is even the slightest bit informed in the area of protein structure and chemistry.

Spray Drying: Simply one of the manufacturing steps often employed to accelerate the drying process before bulk packaging into totes or other containers whereby you wouldn’t want moisture present that could breed bacterium growth.

hope that helps answer your questions. - c