T Nation

Teacher Asks Steph Curry to Not Visit.


#1

I actually thought this makes quite a statement. Obviously as a NYC teacher I'm sure I may view this differently than others might.

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/highschool-prep-rally/bay-area-teacher-asks-steph-curry-to-stay-away-from-his-school-204408033.html

S


#2

Bold stance, and I agree with him.


#3

[quote]CLUNK wrote:
Bold stance, and I agree with him.[/quote]

Yup


#4

Ballsy.


#5

I think it is kind of sad, because a lot of these kids don’t have decent parents to teach them values such as hard work or guide them when they get stuck or make a mistake. I don’t think asking him to not come to the school really solves anything. I think if he was asked to tell the truth, that you need a combination of hard work, innate talent, luck, and a strong support system to get as far as he did.

For example, you can have all of the above, but if you were to get in a car accident and break your leg, you’re done. That’s it. I also think a lot of young people don’t realize how much support adults will give them, and how many chances they really have. When I was in my teens I put so much pressure on myself to make the right decisions because I didn’t feel like I could trust anyone or had any family to talk to.

A lot of kids from poor/shitty families shut down or lack discipline (because they were never taught it!) and usually end up poor later in life because they never had anyone to take the time to set them straight in the first place.


#6

my only gripe might be the students who may be inspired to follow other more realistic avenues by Mr. Curry appearing and speaking to the school now are not exposed to Steph’s inspiring encouragement? I would think a good majority of students do not have an interest in pursuing a sports career (at least as a player) and just need a nudge to pursue realistic goals. Maybe I’m being optimistic or naive with regards to the majority aspirations in the teacher’s school?

Also, I know it’s not mentioned in the article, but I wonder who this teacher would think would be able to instill realistic goals in his students if not Curry (or any other positive sports figure role model)? I.e. if not Mr. Curry, then who would the teacher want? I’d vote for Neil DeGrasse Tyson


#7

[quote]polo77j wrote:
I’d vote for Neil DeGrasse Tyson[/quote]

Again, Tyson has reached celebrity status, and might be viewed by the teacher as such and not a realistic role model.

Getting kids interested in careers that they truly love for the journey, and not one that results in fame and fortune at the end just for those reasons is the goal.


#8

Maybe pick a player who is not extremely gifted, but has made it through sheer will and determination.

When coaching soccer I always stressed that other teams might beat us through being more skilled but they wouldn’t out work us. We didn’t lose.


#9

[quote]CLUNK wrote:

[quote]polo77j wrote:
I’d vote for Neil DeGrasse Tyson[/quote]

Again, Tyson has reached celebrity status, and might be viewed by the teacher as such and not a realistic role model.

Getting kids interested in careers that they truly love for the journey, and not one that results in fame and fortune at the end just for those reasons is the goal. [/quote]

He has reached celebrity status - but based on intellect. He just happens to have a dynamic personality and is recognizable. He’s based in STEM research which is really what is needed and will inspire these kids to follow practical paths that will have wide ranging applications (mathematics, science, tech, etc.) rather than just straight ballin’.

Where Curry’s and Tyson’s message may be similar their delivery and examples will be wildly different with Tyson’s being more practical. Even with a bachelor’s in one of the STEM fields will get them significantly better prospects than if they were to pursue athletics.

While it’s not feasible for them to really attain the status of either of these speakers, at least if they try following in Tyson’s shoes, they’ll more likely settle into a sustainable and overall beneficial role given the skill sets they’ll likely try to mimic in Tyson’s (STEM) than Curry’s (athletics).

If not Tyson, or any celebrity, since that seems to be what you think the teacher is protesting, then who? I’d, basically, hope it would be the teachers themselves.


#10

[quote]Testy1 wrote:
Maybe pick a player who is not extremely gifted, but has made it through sheer will and determination.

When coaching soccer I always stressed that other teams might beat us through being more skilled but they wouldn’t out work us. We didn’t lose.[/quote]

Julian Edleman


#11

Teacher seems like a joy-less douche, who wants to make sure no one else has any fun.


#12

[quote]polo77j wrote:

[quote]CLUNK wrote:

[quote]polo77j wrote:
I’d vote for Neil DeGrasse Tyson[/quote]

Again, Tyson has reached celebrity status, and might be viewed by the teacher as such and not a realistic role model.

Getting kids interested in careers that they truly love for the journey, and not one that results in fame and fortune at the end just for those reasons is the goal. [/quote]

He has reached celebrity status - but based on intellect. He just happens to have a dynamic personality and is recognizable. He’s based in STEM research which is really what is needed and will inspire these kids to follow practical paths that will have wide ranging applications (mathematics, science, tech, etc.) rather than just straight ballin’.

Where Curry’s and Tyson’s message may be similar their delivery and examples will be wildly different with Tyson’s being more practical. Even with a bachelor’s in one of the STEM fields will get them significantly better prospects than if they were to pursue athletics.

While it’s not feasible for them to really attain the status of either of these speakers, at least if they try following in Tyson’s shoes, they’ll more likely settle into a sustainable and overall beneficial role given the skill sets they’ll likely try to mimic in Tyson’s (STEM) than Curry’s (athletics).

If not Tyson, or any celebrity, since that seems to be what you think the teacher is protesting, then who? I’d, basically, hope it would be the teachers themselves.[/quote]

Agree.


#13

[quote]FlatsFarmer wrote:
Teacher seems like a joy-less douche, who wants to make sure no one else has any fun.

[/quote]

Do you have kids?


#14

No, I don’t have any kids. But I used to be a kid, and I used to go to school.

If a local athlete that every one loves is coming to school, everyone goes to school that day.

Somethings can just be fun. Every second of the school day doesn’t have to be spend preparing for some standardized test.

It’s not realistic for everyone to think they’ll play in the NBA, but it’s ridiculous to assume that meeting a basketball player is going to cause kids to drop out of school. “These kids don’t get to play in travel leagues?” What kind of bullshit is that?

Give these disadvantaged kids a thrill! Maybe get them excited about the future. Athletics may open some doors for some kids. Maybe others would get excited about working for the Warriors, or the NBA, or to be gym teachers, or coaches.

When I was in school we had all kinds of visitors.
Cops
Firemen and fire trucks
Orchestra dudes
Andes Flute Band
Pro Hockey Players
Pro Football Players
Dudes doing science experiments on stage
Puppeteers

I never thought I would stop doing my homework because I met some hockey player and was gonna get into the NHL.

Meeting Bruce Smith made me want to go to Virginia Tech, not stop trying in class.


#15

This sounds like reverse psychology - Sounds like he’s fantasizing out loud


#16

Don’t know how much of this is relevant, but having grown up a few blocks away from that school, having attended that school, I would have to say I can understand where the teacher is coming from but I think the teacher should also consider the fact that for every 10 kids that take Mr. Curry’s “message/speech” the “wrong” way there might just be 1 kind out there that “interprets” the message in the “right” way. I think that might be worth it.