T Nation

TBT Questions.....

I have been looking at the TBT program anfd it looks killer but i had a few questions i hope could be answered:

-What poundage will i be using? He mentions reps and sets but no recomended weight.

-What is the reasoning behind the constantly changing rep/set scheme? I have his articles talking about varying paremeters but i was hoping someone could explain how they relate to THIS program.

-After the cycle is up, do i just go back and start again with higher initial weight?

-If you have used the program, what were your feelings on it?
-As a beginner, this was recommended to me as good starting program but i read that Waterbury actually list BBB as a starting point. After reading BBB it seems like a much heavier program (i may be wrong). Thoughts?

-I want to lift to get in better overall shape and as a mountain biker trying to get stronger (and a bit bigger is fine:)so i can throw the bike around easier. I will lift and ride(no real off-season for me):Will the design of this program be better for that than others like, say, a Starr 5x5?

-Lastly, is there any way i can squeeze this into a 2 day a week routine?
Thanks for any help you all can give

[quote]cskolnick wrote:
I have been looking at the TBT program anfd it looks killer but i had a few questions i hope could be answered:

-What poundage will i be using? He mentions reps and sets but no recomended weight.
[/quote]

You should use roughly 320 pounds for bench.

470 for squats
620 for deadlifts
135 for weighted dips
225 for skull curshers

[/quote]
-What is the reasoning behind the constantly changing rep/set scheme? [/quote]

simply to f*ck with you…

[/quote]
-After the cycle is up, do i just go back and start again with higher initial weight? [/quote]

if you want.

[/quote]
-Lastly, is there any way i can squeeze this into a 2 day a week routine?
Thanks for any help you all can give
[/quote]

yeah no problem!! just squeez all the workouts in two days and rest the entire week

OK, you say you have the article and he answer a number of your questions in it.

First, pick a weight that will bring you near failure on the last rep (right out of the article).

Next, he is changing the parameters to help keep you fresh as well as to keep your body quessing.

You can re-do the workout if you want although a number of people like to do something different after completing the workout. Taking a short break or even moving onto one of CW’s other programs or one by someone else is a good idea.

Fit it into two days? Then you wouldn’t be doing TBT since it is a 3 day program.

Is it better than a different program? That really depends on a lot of factors. It is a good program that a number of people have gotten really good results from. Although, a lot of people have gotten the same kind of results from a number of different programs.

[quote]cskolnick wrote:

(1) What poundage will i be using? He mentions reps and sets but no recomended weight.

(2) What is the reasoning behind the constantly changing rep/set scheme? I have his articles talking about varying paremeters but i was hoping someone could explain how they relate to THIS program.

(3) After the cycle is up, do i just go back and start again with higher initial weight?

(4) If you have used the program, what were your feelings on it?
(5) As a beginner, this was recommended to me as good starting program but i read that Waterbury actually list BBB as a starting point. After reading BBB it seems like a much heavier program (i may be wrong). Thoughts?

(6) I want to lift to get in better overall shape and as a mountain biker trying to get stronger (and a bit bigger is fine:)so i can throw the bike around easier. I will lift and ride(no real off-season for me):Will the design of this program be better for that than others like, say, a Starr 5x5?

(7) Lastly, is there any way i can squeeze this into a 2 day a week routine?
Thanks for any help you all can give
[/quote]

(1) Experiment – last set of each exercise should just push you to failure

(2) To mix things up and keep the body guessing. Also, those long sets will help with endurance. 3 X 18 of squats will get the heart bursting thru the chest

(3) Probably try a different routine – maybe going heavier 10X3 or something

(4) I loved it–got stronger and much fitter. Never did long sets–did some single leg exercises (step-ups) for sets of 12-18 and really thought I was gonna have a heart attack

(5) I’m not a trainer but the most difficult thing when you start is getting strong. I would spend a few months with basic lifts – 2-4 sets by 5. Never to failure–cycle up and restart. this will get your strength up quickly.

Look up PTP by Pavel. Would be good if you can do >=3 X week. Frequency is key when you start because you inefficient and weak. Your body will take it and thrive. Do basics–pull-ups, DL, squats, bench. Maybe do GMs and front squats instead of back squats

(6) TBT is great to get into shape. Also look at Meltdown training

(7) Just do it 2X week. No worries–can train more intense. though I really think frequency is key for newbies. Seriously–check out PTP by Pavel

And remember to eat alot

Good luck

[quote]FFB4Life wrote:
cskolnick wrote:
I have been looking at the TBT program anfd it looks killer but i had a few questions i hope could be answered:

-What poundage will i be using? He mentions reps and sets but no recomended weight.

You should use roughly 320 pounds for bench.

470 for squats
620 for deadlifts
135 for weighted dips
225 for skull curshers

-What is the reasoning behind the constantly changing rep/set scheme?

simply to f*ck with you…

-After the cycle is up, do i just go back and start again with higher initial weight?

if you want.

-Lastly, is there any way i can squeeze this into a 2 day a week routine?
Thanks for any help you all can give

yeah no problem!! just squeez all the workouts in two days and rest the entire week
[/quote]

Wow, thanks. You were really helpful.

[quote]Arioch wrote:
OK, you say you have the article and he answer a number of your questions in it.

First, pick a weight that will bring you near failure on the last rep (right out of the article).
[/quote]

Thats the thing. If a weight gets me to failure on 5 reps on day 1, then how could i do that for say 15 on day 2? Would i just figure out a new weight for each rep/set scheme? Sorry if i am missing something, i dont mean to be a pain.

[quote]lesotho72 wrote:
cskolnick wrote:

(1) What poundage will i be using? He mentions reps and sets but no recomended weight.

(2) What is the reasoning behind the constantly changing rep/set scheme? I have his articles talking about varying paremeters but i was hoping someone could explain how they relate to THIS program.

(3) After the cycle is up, do i just go back and start again with higher initial weight?

(4) If you have used the program, what were your feelings on it?
(5) As a beginner, this was recommended to me as good starting program but i read that Waterbury actually list BBB as a starting point. After reading BBB it seems like a much heavier program (i may be wrong). Thoughts?

(6) I want to lift to get in better overall shape and as a mountain biker trying to get stronger (and a bit bigger is fine:)so i can throw the bike around easier. I will lift and ride(no real off-season for me):Will the design of this program be better for that than others like, say, a Starr 5x5?

(7) Lastly, is there any way i can squeeze this into a 2 day a week routine?
Thanks for any help you all can give

(1) Experiment – last set of each exercise should just push you to failure

(2) To mix things up and keep the body guessing. Also, those long sets will help with endurance. 3 X 18 of squats will get the heart bursting thru the chest

(3) Probably try a different routine – maybe going heavier 10X3 or something

(4) I loved it–got stronger and much fitter. Never did long sets–did some single leg exercises (step-ups) for sets of 12-18 and really thought I was gonna have a heart attack

(5) I’m not a trainer but the most difficult thing when you start is getting strong. I would spend a few months with basic lifts – 2-4 sets by 5. Never to failure–cycle up and restart. this will get your strength up quickly.

Look up PTP by Pavel. Would be good if you can do >=3 X week. Frequency is key when you start because you inefficient and weak. Your body will take it and thrive. Do basics–pull-ups, DL, squats, bench. Maybe do GMs and front squats instead of back squats

(6) TBT is great to get into shape. Also look at Meltdown training

(7) Just do it 2X week. No worries–can train more intense. though I really think frequency is key for newbies. Seriously–check out PTP by Pavel

And remember to eat alot

Good luck [/quote]

Awesome, super helpful post. Are their any online sources for PTP or should i go for the book?

[quote]cskolnick wrote:
Arioch wrote:
OK, you say you have the article and he answer a number of your questions in it.

First, pick a weight that will bring you near failure on the last rep (right out of the article).

Thats the thing. If a weight gets me to failure on 5 reps on day 1, then how could i do that for say 15 on day 2? Would i just figure out a new weight for each rep/set scheme? Sorry if i am missing something, i dont mean to be a pain.

[/quote]

no, you bench 225 for singles, you incline press 225 for 4 sets of 6, you squat 225 for 100 reps and then you do tricep extensions with 225

[quote]cskolnick wrote:
Arioch wrote:
OK, you say you have the article and he answer a number of your questions in it.

First, pick a weight that will bring you near failure on the last rep (right out of the article).

Thats the thing. If a weight gets me to failure on 5 reps on day 1, then how could i do that for say 15 on day 2? Would i just figure out a new weight for each rep/set scheme? Sorry if i am missing something, i dont mean to be a pain.

[/quote]

use less weight for higher reps… If the weight seemed light use more on the next set… If it is to heavy take a couple lbs off… try to add more weight every week

[quote]KO421 wrote:
cskolnick wrote:
Arioch wrote:
OK, you say you have the article and he answer a number of your questions in it.

First, pick a weight that will bring you near failure on the last rep (right out of the article).

Thats the thing. If a weight gets me to failure on 5 reps on day 1, then how could i do that for say 15 on day 2? Would i just figure out a new weight for each rep/set scheme? Sorry if i am missing something, i dont mean to be a pain.

use less weight for higher reps… If the weight seemed light use more on the next set… If it is to heavy take a couple lbs off… try to add more weight every week[/quote]
Cool, thanks.

I had a couple of questions related to TBT. When you are performing sets, how much rest is recommended between sets? And also, should you increase the weight from set to set during the same exercise?

For instance, if I am doing 3 sets of squats, should I increase the weight for each set? (300 pounds for set 1, 310 for set 2, and 320 for set 3), or just keep the weight the same? Thanks for everyone’s advice!!!

[quote]tmoney1 wrote:
I had a couple of questions related to TBT. When you are performing sets, how much rest is recommended between sets? And also, should you increase the weight from set to set during the same exercise?

For instance, if I am doing 3 sets of squats, should I increase the weight for each set? (300 pounds for set 1, 310 for set 2, and 320 for set 3), or just keep the weight the same? Thanks for everyone’s advice!!![/quote]

If you feel you can do more weight then certainly add more weight. There’s no exact formula about the weights to use but common sense dictates: if it feels light–i.e. you do a set of 5 and feel you could’ve done a few more–then add weight for the next set.

You don’t take long breaks using this routine so if it feels pretty challenging on the first set then the 2nd set (after a short break) will probably be more difficult and set 3 will be really hard. Just do it. If you’re off by a few lbs. either way it’s not the end of the world–adjust.

[quote]tmoney1 wrote:
I had a couple of questions related to TBT. When you are performing sets, how much rest is recommended between sets? And also, should you increase the weight from set to set during the same exercise?

For instance, if I am doing 3 sets of squats, should I increase the weight for each set? (300 pounds for set 1, 310 for set 2, and 320 for set 3), or just keep the weight the same? Thanks for everyone’s advice!!![/quote]

Uh, if you read the program, it tells you exactly how long to rest between sets on different days.

Like someone said, if the weight is too light, use more. It should be a challenging weight for each set and on the final set, you should be near failure on the last rep. The next time you do the exercise for that rep scheme, you should use more weight.

To the OP, you won’t use the same weight for each rep scheme. As an example, if you use 225 for bench for 8 reps, when you go to 12 reps, you might only use 185-200. Again, this depends on your ability to do that much weight for that many reps.

Just re-read TBT when i got home last night and sure enough, alot of my questions and loads and such where addrressed in the article. My bad :slight_smile:
With that said, thanks a bunch to those who still answered the questions; it did help clear up some of the other things i was uncertain of.

No worries. If you have some specific questions about pairing or anything like that, ask. Those can get consfusing.

Just know, I found the even numbered weeks easier than the odd numbered weeks. The extra rest while pairing the exercises helps a ton.