T Nation

TBT for Fat Loss?


#1

I was reading the threads on how Bauer and Waylander became two of the biggest TNationals and they both basically said TBT sucks for mass gain. however, is TBT ok for fat loss? when I was on my diet phase, I followed an alternating push/pull split as my main routine. I incorporated big, explosive lifts (front/back squat, overhead press, bench press, dips, pullups and variations, cleans, deadlifts) into an all-out session lasting half an hour or less.

is a form of TBT ok as part of a fat-loss program?


#2

how did it work for you?


#3

I imagine it worked ok for me. my av is a pic taken at the end of the diet phase.

my first measurement one month in:
2/8/11
ab 20mm skinfold
chest 10
thigh 14
13.2% bf (no bw, doh. but I was around 180-185# at the time)

last measurement around the time the pic was taken:
5/18/11
ab 17.5
chest 7.5
thigh 9
169#
10.18%

obviously the measurements show an improvement, and the TBT was part of a routine that included protein pulse fasts, "fasted" walking, steady state cardio and dieting. but it wouldn't be the first time I was wrong here.


#4

A "part of" a fat loss plan, definitely. Complexes, which are pretty much full body by definition, are absolutely killer for fat loss:
http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/complexes_for_fat_loss
http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/complexes_20_optimize_your_fatloss_workouts
http://www.T-Nation.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance/screw_cardio_four_complexes_for_a_shredded_physique

Some complexes, a few days of heavy lifting (whatever kind of split), and basic tightened-up nutrition would be a solid fat loss plan.

Not sure if you mean a TBT plan was the only lifting you were doing or not. If so, that's not necessarily a bad thing. Contrary to popular opinion, full body workouts aren't the worst thing you could be doing in the weight room.

However, it's also very common to stick with whatever weight training plan you were doing before you started the cutting plan, to "force" your body hold onto muscle. As with most things, many different strategies can work.


#5

yes, it was the only lifting I was doing.

push days looked like:
standing overhead press
front or half squat
back squat
flat bench or db floor press
weighted dips

pull days looked like:
weighted pullups and variations
power clean
pendlay row
RDL

each day was performed as 3 circuits with 8 reps per movement and as little rest as possible between movements, maybe 90 seconds rest max in between circuits. with every session, I always tried to increase weights, decrease rest periods, and/or increase explosiveness. my weights went up pretty much across the board, RDL in particular started at 155#, then 185#, then 205#.

my heart rate usually averaged around 150bpm and peaked around 170-180 bpm. the whole thing took maybe half an hour and I was WIPED OUT after, but some days I'd do another ten minutes or so of loaded carries or sled drags. my ITB really hated me after about ten weeks...


#6

because of my work schedule though, some weeks I'd have four days to train, other weeks only one or two days. so, to make up for those "short" weeks I'd try to do at least two-a-days ("fasted" walks + complexes) every day in that four-day training period, if not three-a-days (45-60 minutes of steady-state cardio later in the day after complexes).

I'd concentrate 100g carbs peri-workout and try to restrict myself to 50g or less on non-training days. I figured I'd be ok with re-feeds/cheat meals every 1-2 weeks but at about 10-12 weeks I was feeling really run-down until I got 3-4 weeks into using Alpha Male. I also snuck 3-4 donuts too many on some non-training days while at work =x