T Nation

Survey of Doctors; They Don't Know Sh*t


#1

Background
To assess the nutrition knowledge of physicians on the basic effects of diet on blood lipids and lipoproteins.
Methods

Anonymous mailed dietary knowledge surveys to 6000 randomly selected physicians in the United States licensed in either Internal Medicine or Cardiology.

Results
Response rate: 16% (n = 639).

Half of the physicians did not know that canola oil and 26% did not know olive oil were good sources of monounsaturated fat.

Ninety-three percent (84% of cardiologists vs. 96% of internists; p < 0.001) did not know that a low-fat diet, in general, would increase blood triglycerides.

Approximately three-quarters (70% of cardiologists vs. 77% of internists; p < 0.01) did not know a low-fat diet would decrease HDL-c and almost half (45%) thought that a low-fat diet would not change HDL-c.

Conclusions
If physicians are to implement dietary and cholesterol management guidelines, they will likely need to become more knowledgeable about nutrition.


#2

this is news?


#3

Yes, since the others (non T-Nation people) think their doctors know everything and he’s always right.
My idiot friend who listens to everything I tell him, reluctantly (he dropped 26 lbs and hasn’t been in this good of shape in 20 years) when I told him about the survey, he questioned how many doctors, then said, well when I have my heart attack I’ll go to a doctor
? what?
what does that have to do with doctors not knowing sh*t?
And doctors would TREAT ME in that instant, they didn’t give me my nutrition plan


#4

sorry, I meant news on this forum.

News to everyone else, yes.

I was talking to my class today (seniors), and after talking about this exact thread they asked well how do I trust my doctor or where can I get more info (can’t send them to T-Nation). boy, is that not an easy question to answer, lol


#5

[quote]Meni69 wrote:
Background
To assess the nutrition knowledge of physicians on the basic effects of diet on blood lipids and lipoproteins.
Methods

Anonymous mailed dietary knowledge surveys to 6000 randomly selected physicians in the United States licensed in either Internal Medicine or Cardiology.

Results
Response rate: 16% (n = 639).

Half of the physicians did not know that canola oil and 26% did not know olive oil were good sources of monounsaturated fat.

Ninety-three percent (84% of cardiologists vs. 96% of internists; p < 0.001) did not know that a low-fat diet, in general, would increase blood triglycerides.

Approximately three-quarters (70% of cardiologists vs. 77% of internists; p < 0.01) did not know a low-fat diet would decrease HDL-c and almost half (45%) thought that a low-fat diet would not change HDL-c.

Conclusions
If physicians are to implement dietary and cholesterol management guidelines, they will likely need to become more knowledgeable about nutrition.[/quote]

Would you be able to put up a link to this article or study please?


#6

Thinking about some of the people I partied and hung out with that are going to be medical doctors terrifies me.

Lol not sure if that’s related or not.


#7

When I was about 18 or 19 the doctor gave me a pamphlet on weight loss ( I was about 180 to 185 then) and it was for 900 cals a day!
I told my mom that even if I needed to lose fat this wasn’t that way to do it and she told me there was no way I knew more than a doctor.


#8

[quote]Charlie Horse wrote:

[quote]Meni69 wrote:
Background
To assess the nutrition knowledge of physicians on the basic effects of diet on blood lipids and lipoproteins.
Methods

Anonymous mailed dietary knowledge surveys to 6000 randomly selected physicians in the United States licensed in either Internal Medicine or Cardiology.

Results
Response rate: 16% (n = 639).

Half of the physicians did not know that canola oil and 26% did not know olive oil were good sources of monounsaturated fat.

Ninety-three percent (84% of cardiologists vs. 96% of internists; p < 0.001) did not know that a low-fat diet, in general, would increase blood triglycerides.

Approximately three-quarters (70% of cardiologists vs. 77% of internists; p < 0.01) did not know a low-fat diet would decrease HDL-c and almost half (45%) thought that a low-fat diet would not change HDL-c.

Conclusions
If physicians are to implement dietary and cholesterol management guidelines, they will likely need to become more knowledgeable about nutrition.[/quote]

Would you be able to put up a link to this article or study please?[/quote]

here ya go


#9

[quote]Meni69 wrote:
Yes, since the others (non T-Nation people) think their doctors know everything and he’s always right.
My idiot friend who listens to everything I tell him, reluctantly (he dropped 26 lbs and hasn’t been in this good of shape in 20 years) when I told him about the survey, he questioned how many doctors, then said, well when I have my heart attack I’ll go to a doctor
? what?
what does that have to do with doctors not knowing sh*t?
And doctors would TREAT ME in that instant, they didn’t give me my nutrition plan
[/quote]

With that said, it’s still better to listen to a doctor than you.


#10

[quote]TD54 wrote:

[quote]Meni69 wrote:
Yes, since the others (non T-Nation people) think their doctors know everything and he’s always right.
My idiot friend who listens to everything I tell him, reluctantly (he dropped 26 lbs and hasn’t been in this good of shape in 20 years) when I told him about the survey, he questioned how many doctors, then said, well when I have my heart attack I’ll go to a doctor
? what?
what does that have to do with doctors not knowing sh*t?
And doctors would TREAT ME in that instant, they didn’t give me my nutrition plan
[/quote]

With that said, it’s still better to listen to a doctor than you.[/quote]

No its not, thank you for your input.


#11

[quote]TD54 wrote:

With that said, it’s still better to listen to a doctor than you.[/quote]

x2. Of course, it’s up to the individual to make sure their particular doctor is not an idiot, but yes - I’ll take the advice of a board certified medical professional any day.

You’d have to be fucking retarded to take medical advice from some stranger on the Internet…lol…the idea that some douchebag who “dabbles in endocrinology” should be a better source of knowledge then an actual endocrinologist is absolutely laughable.

That’s just an example, not aimed at any particular person, but seriously - who is actually fucking dumb enough to trust the opinion of some anonymous dope over a medical professional?

Now, you can get some ideas from people, that you may want to express to your doctor, but replacing your doctor with some doofus on the Internet - not a very smart thing to do…


#12

My point is many doctors give bad advice on nutrition to patients.

this is alarming

Ninety-three percent (84% of cardiologists vs. 96% of internists; p < 0.001) did not know that a low-fat diet, in general, would increase blood triglycerides.


#13

[quote]Meni69 wrote:
My point is many doctors give bad advice on nutrition to patients.

this is alarming

Ninety-three percent (84% of cardiologists vs. 96% of internists; p < 0.001) did not know that a low-fat diet, in general, would increase blood triglycerides. [/quote]

That’s not news. I’m a nutrition major, on my way to an RD credential - and that’s why the field of Dietetics exists - because doctors are NOT nutrition experts.

I just think it’s irresponsible to position yourself as an authority on medical matters when you’re clearly not. I mean, you flat-out said that people should listen to you over a doctor. And forgive me if I’m mistaken, but don’t you run a porn business for a living? And hey - I love porn, god bless ya for providing it, but unless you also hold an advanced medical degree on the side, I don’t think you should convince people to listen to you over a doctor. I totally agree that some doctors are idiots, but to paint the entire medical profession in a bad light because of a few rotten apples doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense…


#14

[quote]SkyNett wrote:

[quote]Meni69 wrote:
My point is many doctors give bad advice on nutrition to patients.

this is alarming

Ninety-three percent (84% of cardiologists vs. 96% of internists; p < 0.001) did not know that a low-fat diet, in general, would increase blood triglycerides. [/quote]

That’s not news. I’m a nutrition major, on my way to an RD credential - and that’s why the field of Dietetics exists - because doctors are NOT nutrition experts.

I just think it’s irresponsible to position yourself as an authority on medical matters when you’re clearly not. I mean, you flat-out said that people should listen to you over a doctor. And forgive me if I’m mistaken, but don’t you run a porn business for a living? And hey - I love porn, god bless ya for providing it, but unless you also hold an advanced medical degree on the side, I don’t think you should convince people to listen to you over a doctor. I totally agree that some doctors are idiots, but to paint the entire medical profession in a bad light because of a few rotten apples doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense… [/quote]

When did I say I am an authority on medical matters?
I book strippers.


#15

a few bad apples? dud over 90% got the 2nd question wrong
9 out of 10.


#16

[quote]SkyNett wrote:

[quote]Meni69 wrote:
My point is many doctors give bad advice on nutrition to patients.

this is alarming

Ninety-three percent (84% of cardiologists vs. 96% of internists; p < 0.001) did not know that a low-fat diet, in general, would increase blood triglycerides. [/quote]

That’s not news. I’m a nutrition major, on my way to an RD credential - and that’s why the field of Dietetics exists - because doctors are NOT nutrition experts.

I just think it’s irresponsible to position yourself as an authority on medical matters when you’re clearly not. I mean, you flat-out said that people should listen to you over a doctor. And forgive me if I’m mistaken, but don’t you run a porn business for a living? And hey - I love porn, god bless ya for providing it, but unless you also hold an advanced medical degree on the side, I don’t think you should convince people to listen to you over a doctor. I totally agree that some doctors are idiots, but to paint the entire medical profession in a bad light because of a few rotten apples doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense… [/quote]

Hi SkyNett
I believe the op manages strippers, but whatever.
I have read a few things about how dietary cholesterol does not necessarily effect blood cholesterol or at least not for everyone. This is one of the articles I’ve read about this.

I was wondering what your take is on this.


#17

med students are only required to take 1 class on nutrition and metabolism in their first yr usually…

most of which is forgotten…

Unless you make a point to educate yourself further through self education, you will never be able to understand nutrition at a very high level…


#18

Doctors are just like any profession, you have good ones and bad ones
and ones who keep up to date in their skills and knowledge and those
who don’t. Medicine is such an enormously broad field that it is impossible
for a Doc to know everything, even within their own specialty. One problem
I see, and many Docs back this up, is that they resist telling their patients
that they don’t know something and quite often give out incorrect advice
by falling back on their education which may be waaay out of date. My
primary Doc and I are good friends and we discuss this fairly often. Just
like any other profession, what you learn in school is typically very outdated
in some, other than basic, areas. Point being, not all doctors keep up to date
with the leading understanding in their fields and should be challenged when
you think they are wrong. Make them prove their advice. In general, most Docs
do a great job given the current litigious and economic situation, but, they
are consultants to your health and YOU are responsible for your treatment and
options. Given that, internet advice on a health matter should be challenged
even more vigorously.

2 cents.


#19

[quote]Charlie Horse wrote:

[quote]SkyNett wrote:

[quote]Meni69 wrote:
My point is many doctors give bad advice on nutrition to patients.

this is alarming

Ninety-three percent (84% of cardiologists vs. 96% of internists; p < 0.001) did not know that a low-fat diet, in general, would increase blood triglycerides. [/quote]

That’s not news. I’m a nutrition major, on my way to an RD credential - and that’s why the field of Dietetics exists - because doctors are NOT nutrition experts.

I just think it’s irresponsible to position yourself as an authority on medical matters when you’re clearly not. I mean, you flat-out said that people should listen to you over a doctor. And forgive me if I’m mistaken, but don’t you run a porn business for a living? And hey - I love porn, god bless ya for providing it, but unless you also hold an advanced medical degree on the side, I don’t think you should convince people to listen to you over a doctor. I totally agree that some doctors are idiots, but to paint the entire medical profession in a bad light because of a few rotten apples doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense… [/quote]

Hi SkyNett
I believe the op manages strippers, but whatever.
I have read a few things about how dietary cholesterol does not necessarily effect blood cholesterol or at least not for everyone. This is one of the articles I’ve read about this.

I was wondering what your take is on this.
[/quote]

If interested, there was an article on here that cited 20-21 sources basically proving that dietary cholesterol had no effect of blood cholesterol levels. I tend to think it’s one of those instances like “you are what you eat” and “eating fat will make you fat”. I’ll try and find it really quickly…


#20

[quote]Charlie Horse wrote:
Hi SkyNett
I believe the op manages strippers, but whatever.
I have read a few things about how dietary cholesterol does not necessarily effect blood cholesterol or at least not for everyone. This is one of the articles I’ve read about this.

I was wondering what your take is on this.
[/quote]

Hi Charlie - my take is that I agree 100 % with those findings. I wasn’t really debating that - there are a LOT of people on this board in general who swear their medical advice is better than an actual medical professional - which 99.9% of the time is patently false.

I just find it absurd when - say a mailman - wants to play endocrinologist. I think it’s tremendously irresponsible and dangerous. And there seems to be no shortage of dipshits lining up for this advice while shitting on actual board-certified professionals.

That was really my point. : )