T Nation

Supplements for Bone?

hello everyone, i’ve cracks on the outer bone of my left ankle, it take about 6 weeks to recover.

i want to know what supplements you guys will suggest me to take? calcium? glucosamine? how much should i take?
any advice? i need fast recovery.

[quote]Monster Wong wrote:
hello everyone, i’ve cracks on the outer bone of my left ankle, it take about 6 weeks to recover.

i want to know what supplements you guys will suggest me to take? calcium? glucosamine? how much should i take?
any advice? i need fast recovery.[/quote]

Lots of raw milk and Vitamin K… spend a good half hour a day in the sun, and rest!!!

Methoxy-7

[quote]golooraam wrote:
Monster Wong wrote:
hello everyone, i’ve cracks on the outer bone of my left ankle, it take about 6 weeks to recover.

i want to know what supplements you guys will suggest me to take? calcium? glucosamine? how much should i take?
any advice? i need fast recovery.

Lots of raw milk and Vitamin K… spend a good half hour a day in the sun, and rest!!![/quote]

it doesnt work too well if you’re referring to vitamin D production in the skin. it’s still winter and too far from the equator at this point. it’d take longer than 30 minutes.

[quote]Tungsten wrote:
it doesnt work too well if you’re referring to vitamin D production in the skin. it’s still winter and too far from the equator at this point. it’d take longer than 30 minutes.[/quote]

i live in austrlia, now is summer. extremely strong solar radiation…i’m afraid of skin cancer…

[quote]Monster Wong wrote:

i live in austrlia, now is summer. extremely strong solar radiation…i’m afraid of skin cancer…[/quote]

Well fear won’t help anything. Sunbathing would probably not be such a great idea, but if it’s the summer, get outside and absorb some daylight. Sitting in a dark room all your life can’t be good. With anything, moderation is the key.

i play rugby so i feel for you. try lactoferrin. naturally occurs in human and cow’s milk, so find a lactating lady (or heifer, if you’re feeling truly adventurous or Scottish) and get to milking. alternatively, try biotest’s Grow! with micellar casein; the relatively undenatured milk protein will contain a lot of it. two refs for you:

“Lactoferrin promotes bone growth.”

Biometals. 2004 Jun;17(3):331-5.

We have demonstrated bovine or human lactoferrin to be an anabolic factor in skeletal tissue. In vitro, lactoferrin stimulates the proliferation of bone forming cells, osteoblasts, and cartilage cells at physiological concentrations (above 0.1 microg/ml). The magnitude of this effect exceeds that observed in response to other skeletal growth factors such as IGF-1 and TGFbeta. DNA synthesis is also stimulated in a bone organ culture system likely reflecting the proliferation of cells of the osteoblast lineage. Lactoferrin is also a potent osteoblast survival factor. In TUNEL and DNA fragmentation assays, lactoferrin decreased apoptosis, induced by serum withdrawal, by up to 70%. In addition, lactoferrin has powerful effects on bone resorbing cells, osteoclasts, decreasing osteoclast development at concentrations > 1 microg/ml in a murine bone marrow culture system. However, lactoferrin did not alter bone resorption in calvarial organ culture, suggesting that it does not influence mature osteoclast function. In vivo, local injection of lactoferrin in adult mice resulted in increased calvarial bone growth, with significant increases in bone area and dynamic histomorphometric indices of bone formation after only 5 injections. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the naturally-occurring glycoprotein lactoferrin is anabolic to bone in vivo, an effect which is consequent upon its potent proliferative and anti-apoptotic actions in osteoblasts, and its ability to inhibit osteoclastogenesis. Lactoferrin may therefore have a physiological role in bone growth, and a potential therapeutic role in osteoporosis.

and…

“Lactoferrin is a potent regulator of bone cell activity and increases bone formation in vivo.” Endocrinology. 2004 Sep;145(9):4366-74. Epub 2004 May 27

Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein present in epithelial secretions, such as milk, and in the secondary granules of neutrophils. We found it to be present in fractions of milk protein that stimulated osteoblast growth, so we assessed its effects on bone cell function. Lactoferrin produced large, dose-related increases in thymidine incorporation in primary or cell line cultures of human or rat osteoblast-like cells, at physiological concentrations (1-100 microg/ml). Maximal stimulation was 5-fold above control. Lactoferrin also increased osteoblast differentiation and reduced osteoblast apoptosis by up to 50-70%. Similarly, lactoferrin stimulated proliferation of primary chondrocytes. Purified, recombinant, human, or bovine lactoferrins had similar potencies. In mouse bone marrow cultures, osteoclastogenesis was dose-dependently decreased and was completely arrested by lactoferrin, 100 microg/ml, associated with decreased expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand. In contrast, lactoferrin had no effect on bone resorption by isolated mature osteoclasts. Lactoferrin was administered over calvariae of adult mice for 5 d. New bone formation, assessed using fluorochrome labels, was increased 4-fold by a 4-mg dose of lactoferrin. Thus, lactoferrin has powerful anabolic, differentiating, and antiapoptotic effects on osteoblasts and inhibits osteoclastogenesis. Lactoferrin is a potential therapeutic target in bone disorders such as osteoporosis and is possibly an important physiological regulator of bone growth.

good luck.