T Nation

Supplements/Food to Avoid on TRT?

Hey all,
I’m new to all this and been reading like a madman.

I’ve recently been put on TRT by doc and was wondering, are there any foods or supplements that should always be AVOIDED when on TRT ?

Thanks so much for any responses!

JH

Now that your body does not work right on auto pilot and along with aging, you need to do a number of things to maintain your vitality. When you don’t take such things for granted any more, you can see the value of general supplements, better diet and nutrition, fish oil, olive oil, fresh veges, dietary iodine, trace minerals, calcium, magnesium and some functional medicine as need. And lots of sex, that is good for the neural transmitters.

What to avoid should be obvious. Many foods are empty from a nutrient point of view. There are bad fats, at least bad when in excess or when good fats are not also present. You need to avoid glucose spikes from high glucemic index meals. Glucose binding to proteins is one of the irreversible processes of aging and that is why poorly controlled diabetes leads to so many life threatening conditions.

Some meals encourage GH release, others block GH release. Too much for this post.

Avoid drugs that reduce E2 clearance rates. Smoking… go kill yourself.

And proper physical activity to keep things working.

All that makes great sense. Poor nutritional value foods, smoking etc all very obvious to me.

I guess I was looking for “specific” supplements, like… Don’t take DHA supplement (I think that would be obvious as we dont’ want our DHT to be further elevated but I could be wrong). O

This might be the right place to ask, has anyone else found that 8-10 onces of soy milk a day to be a problem with their E2. I have been having trouble getting my E2 down even on 1mg of Arimidex EOD and I was told that the soy milk that I was using for my protien shakes was possible the problem. Anyone else have first hand experience with this problem.

[quote]jhoward1102 wrote:
I guess I was looking for “specific” supplements, like… Don’t take DHA supplement (I think that would be obvious as we dont’ want our DHT to be further elevated but I could be wrong). O
[/quote]

DHT is vital for libido and the sex organs. If you had high T and little or no DHT you would have no libido. Males who have missing/defective DHT receptors have a self explanatory condition called: micro penis. In Europe, you can get proviron prescribed, which is a DHT derivative. In the USA, compounded DHT creams, gels and other products used to be available, but there are no FDA approved DHT manufactures anymore since some labs were shut down in China going into the Chinese Olympics. We do not seem to have the ability to manufacture steroids here, its all offshore. So no DHT for HRT. I have increased my DHT by increasing my T dose and by application of T cream to my scrotum. T gels cover large skin areas and can produce the highest DHT of any delivery system. T creams less so as these are higher %T and cover smaller skin areas. Injections produce the least DHT. Stanozolol might be a good option, but may simply be too expensive for TRT/HRT use.

So, the more DHT the better then?

[quote]KSman wrote:

[quote]jhoward1102 wrote:
I guess I was looking for “specific” supplements, like… Don’t take DHA supplement (I think that would be obvious as we dont’ want our DHT to be further elevated but I could be wrong). O
[/quote]

DHT is vital for libido and the sex organs. If you had high T and little or no DHT you would have no libido. Males who have missing/defective DHT receptors have a self explanatory condition called: micro penis. In Europe, you can get proviron prescribed, which is a DHT derivative. In the USA, compounded DHT creams, gels and other products used to be available, but there are no FDA approved DHT manufactures anymore since some labs were shut down in China going into the Chinese Olympics. We do not seem to have the ability to manufacture steroids here, its all offshore. So no DHT for HRT. I have increased my DHT by increasing my T dose and by application of T cream to my scrotum. T gels cover large skin areas and can produce the highest DHT of any delivery system. T creams less so as these are higher %T and cover smaller skin areas. Injections produce the least DHT. Stanozolol might be a good option, but may simply be too expensive for TRT/HRT use.[/quote]

Within reason. But not if prostate is a problem or you get wigged out about hair loss… nice pun! Many docs have been taught be drug reps that DHT is evil and that the need to write scripts for 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. Note that such drugs totally destroy HPTA function in some men, including guys near 20 YO.

Elevated or high E2 levels are a greater risk of prostate enlargement and cancer than DHT. When prostate cells go rogue, yes, less DHT will make they less active. Note that a major cause of prostate enlargement and cancer is a lack of ejaculation. Seminal fluids are not expelled and go rancid, creating inflammation that spreads from the seminal vessels to the prostate. Inflammation does many evil things. So low T and or elevated E leads to less sex which leads to inflammation. TRT increases sex drive, and if done right, E2 is managed at lower ranges, increasing libido and keeping the seminal vessels cleaned out. TRT done properly will reduce prostate enlargement and cancer, while increasing/restoring DHT levels.

[quote]KSman wrote:
…Glucose binding to proteins is one of the irreversible processes of aging and that is why poorly controlled diabetes leads to so many life threatening conditions. [/quote]

Benfotiamine, (no “h” in there) a synthetic B vitamin, is claimed to help the body rid itself of advanced glycation end-products (glucose bound to protein). It’s hard to tell if it is having any effects though.

From LEF.org today:

“”"
Many of you are aware of the FDAâ??s corrupt ban of pyridoxamine last year. This form of vitamin B6 was being sold as a low-cost supplement to protect against age-accelerating glycation reactions in the body. A pharmaceutical company convinced the FDA to outlaw pyridoxamine supplements and turn this safe form of B6 into a prescription drug â?¦ one that has not yet been approved!

Life Extension® was able to get around the lethal effects of the FDAâ??s decree by substituting pyridoxal 5â??-phosphate, a form of vitamin B6 with similar anti-glycation properties. Now another pharmaceutical company has petitioned the FDA asking that pyridoxal 5â??-phosphate be banned so that it too can be converted into a high-priced prescription drug.

“”"

[quote]KSman wrote:
Within reason. But not if prostate is a problem or you get wigged out about hair loss… nice pun! Many docs have been taught be drug reps that DHT is evil and that the need to write scripts for 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. Note that such drugs totally destroy HPTA function in some men, including guys near 20 YO.

Elevated or high E2 levels are a greater risk of prostate enlargement and cancer than DHT. When prostate cells go rogue, yes, less DHT will make they less active. Note that a major cause of prostate enlargement and cancer is a lack of ejaculation. Seminal fluids are not expelled and go rancid, creating inflammation that spreads from the seminal vessels to the prostate. Inflammation does many evil things. So low T and or elevated E leads to less sex which leads to inflammation. TRT increases sex drive, and if done right, E2 is managed at lower ranges, increasing libido and keeping the seminal vessels cleaned out. TRT done properly will reduce prostate enlargement and cancer, while increasing/restoring DHT levels.[/quote]

Is there a DHT level or range that is considered ideal? In other words, not so low that it will affect libido, but not overly high so that it will affect hair loss etc.