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Supersetting Quads and Hams

Has anybody tried supersetting them?
I was just curious, might give it a try next week.
This came to my mind cause supersetting arms goes so well then I wondered if it is the same with legs.

Example of what I would do:

Front squat ss Romanian deadlift
Leg curl ss Leg extension
etc…

[quote]Matias A. wrote:
Has anybody tried supersetting them?
I was just curious, might give it a try next week.
This came to my mind cause supersetting arms goes so well then I wondered if it is the same with legs.

Example of what I would do:

Front squat ss Romanian deadlift
Leg curl ss Leg extension
etc…
[/quote]
Ya, I’ve done things like:

A1-barbell split squat or front squat
A2-SLDL

or

A1-barbell step up
A2-lying leg curl

30-60sec rest between exercises of the superset and 90-120sec rest between overall sets…overall slightly tougher than not doing supersets.

I supersetting them with a bodybuilder once and him and I were going back and forth for 4 sets with really no rest and him and I had the feeling of throwing up on and after the 4th set. Pace yourself with them I would say with proper rest. At least 1 minute.

A true superset (meaning going directly from one exercise to the next with no rest) might work well for something like leg extensions and leg curls, but no way I would want to try that with the heavier exercises like squats and RDL’s.

What is being described above is what I’d call “pairing” exercises, where you go back and forth between two (usually antagonistic) exercises, but rest between them. This allows one muscle group to somewhat rest while the antagonist is working (reciprocal inhibition) and for the “density”/time efficiency of the workout to be increased, but generally still allows for at least decent training poundages to be used. Actual super setting would result in either drastically reduced training poundages, injury, or yeah, vomiting; none of which would really be beneficial IMO.

The theory behind antagonist superset is sound. However it is hard to apply successfully on legs when it comes to compound movements. The reason is that during a movement like a squat, all the lower body muscles are involved (quads, hams, glutes, calves to some extent) and even the RDL, which is primarily a posterior chain exercise hit the quads some (mostly isometrically to hold the position).

So the RDL would decrease squatting (or front squatting) performance by fatiguing the hamstings/glutes to a significant extent and the quads to some degree. They would also fatigue the lower back which would make it harder to keep an upright position in the squat.

That having been said, the front squat will not have too much of a negative impact on the RDL (the back squat would). So doing front squats then RDL would work. But I would then take ample rest before going back to the front squat, to avoid a negative impact.

I did a lying ham curls / leg press superset this morning. No rest between sets.

I haven’t tried it with the compound lifts.