T Nation

Sun Tzu is a Clear Thinker

Dude really know his shit. Not just about war, but human nature in general. I’m reading The Art of War right now and it just occurs to me that everything he says is correct. Definitely T-Reading, to create another ridiculous T-Cliche.

The art of war it’s a brilliant book I’ve read it before I found it very interesting.

Sorry I have to disagree but no it’s not. Way too radical for the whole of T-Nation.

I’d recommend Shambhala Publications edition. The translation really offers itself to a full understanding and tries to keep with the format of the original scrolls. This is important because whoever the author is had an affinity for an almost meditative train of thought which completely lines itself with the readers consciousness. If you can imagine that, it implies that the thoughts are yours, not the authors. I had this copy but I lent it to a friend and never saw it again.

Which publication are you reading?

I love Sun Tzu. He was strategic in thought and deed. Realistic, and genuine. His thoughts apply to a lot of things.

damn right!

Sun Tzu: The Illustrated edition rocks. It’s got pictures.

[quote]Bujo wrote:
Sun Tzu: The Illustrated edition rocks. It’s got pictures.[/quote]

Not surprising considering the pictures are the only way you’d understand it :stuck_out_tongue:

OP: Sun Tzu was, not is.

“The Art of War” is an ok read. The significance of the book gets blown out of proportion, if you ask me.

DB

[quote]dollarbill44 wrote:
OP: Sun Tzu was, not is.

“The Art of War” is an ok read. The significance of the book gets blown out of proportion, if you ask me.

DB[/quote]

explain

[quote]meangenes wrote:
Sorry I have to disagree but no it’s not. Way too radical for the whole of T-Nation.

I’d recommend Shambhala Publications edition. The translation really offers itself to a full understanding and tries to keep with the format of the original scrolls. This is important because whoever the author is had an affinity for an almost meditative train of thought which completely lines itself with the readers consciousness. If you can imagine that, it implies that the thoughts are yours, not the authors. I had this copy but I lent it to a friend and never saw it again.

Which publication are you reading?[/quote]

He was a taoist.

His book is interesting because he practices what he preaches without most people noticing.

While people are reading his books he conquers their mind and teaches them not what he thought but how he thought.

I do not know if a translation can come close to the original. Chinese seems to have an in-built ambiguity that is ideally suited to be used to teach tao-ism style and since I do not speak Chinese I wonder how much is lost in the translation.

[quote]meangenes wrote:
dollarbill44 wrote:
OP: Sun Tzu was, not is.

“The Art of War” is an ok read. The significance of the book gets blown out of proportion, if you ask me.

DB

explain[/quote]

Sun Tzu gets very little airtime in US military circles. His writings are basically observations of common sense tactics, so doctrinally speaking, it’s marginally less useful than other military books. Sure, it has some nuggets of wisdom, but if it wasn’t for Gordon Gekko quoting it in “Wall St” and a few high-profile MBA programs adding it to their reading lists to make their students feel empowered, I doubt it would even garner much discussion.

DB

[quote]jzzz wrote:
The art of war it’s a brilliant book I’ve read it before I found it very interesting.[/quote]

You should try reading about punctuation.

[quote]dollarbill44 wrote:
meangenes wrote:
dollarbill44 wrote:
OP: Sun Tzu was, not is.

“The Art of War” is an ok read. The significance of the book gets blown out of proportion, if you ask me.

DB

explain

Sun Tzu gets very little airtime in US military circles. His writings are basically observations of common sense tactics, so doctrinally speaking, it’s marginally less useful than other military books. Sure, it has some nuggets of wisdom, but if it wasn’t for Gordon Gekko quoting it in “Wall St” and a few high-profile MBA programs adding it to their reading lists to make their students feel empowered, I doubt it would even garner much discussion.

DB[/quote]

one of those things everyone gets into because they heard about it somewhere and think its super cool cause everyone else thinkts its super cool or offers something genius

ya know, just like the Beatles and Star Wars.

I actually enjoyed reading it. I read excerpts from it online. When I become a General I’ll definitely apply it. Gonna take over the world.

[quote]polo77j wrote:
Bujo wrote:
Sun Tzu: The Illustrated edition rocks. It’s got pictures.

Not surprising considering the pictures are the only way you’d understand it :P[/quote]

Ahhh, pictures. Is there anything they can’t teach?

Military tactics. Check
Sex. Check
Monkey lobotomies. Check

[quote]Bujo wrote:
polo77j wrote:
Bujo wrote:
Sun Tzu: The Illustrated edition rocks. It’s got pictures.

Not surprising considering the pictures are the only way you’d understand it :stuck_out_tongue:

Ahhh, pictures. Is there anything they can’t teach?

Military tactics. Check
Sex. Check
Monkey lobotomies. Check

[/quote]

Sentiments I’ve come to love…

Military tactics have changed alot but the book is still very interesting. These days officers just sit around computers and play a military version of command and conquer. But its alot more complex and the pictures arnt as pretty.

[quote]jzzz wrote:
These days officers just sit around computers and play a military version of command and conquer. [/quote]

I hope you’re being sarcastic. Otherwise, you have no knowledge of the military.

DB

I like Sun Tzu, but I’ve always found Napoleon’s Maxim’s to be just as useful.

http://www.military-info.com/freebies/maximsn.htm

Warfighting (USMC) & The Book Of Five Rings also makes for insightful reading.

Another winner IMO is - Leadership Lessons of the Navy SEALS

Thanks FightinIrish26 for Nappy’s maxims - I’ve printed them out for some deep thought on the subway ride home tonight.