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Sumo Deadlift Can Actually Replace Squat?


#1

Hi guys, I explain my general situation: I am 23 years old, I have trained since 2 years. Recently I had back pain for two months, but now is go away. From that moment I have started doing some strech to fix Anterior pelvic tilt. Moreover, I want to stop doing squat because I have ATP and I feel that squat isn't a good thing for me. To confirm this, I think I don't perform squat in the correct way (especially when I lift bigger weights) as I can't feel the posterior chain works well.

Considering this situation, I have thought to replace definitively squat with sumo deadlift and walking lunges (I usually do conventional one) to work more the posterior chain and fix the ATP as I read in an article here. In addiction to my leg routine I will do only one-leg press and leg curl(horizontal or 45 degree..what's best for my situation?).

So, I hope to receive your expert opininion about my intetion.. and in long terms vision, Can Sumo deadlift actually replace squat in a hypertrophy legs workout?

hank you in advance for your help :smiley:


#2

I’m also interested in the answer to this.


#3

[quote]Jnatural wrote:
Can Sumo deadlift actually replace squat in a hypertrophy legs workout?
[/quote]
I wouldn’t credit sumo deadlift with being able to replace squats for any purpose, but least of all hypertrophy. If you want leg hypertrophy without squatting do leg press and leg curls and leg extensions and hack squats and lunges and whatever the hell else.

For what it’s worth though, “anterior pelvic tilt” is a pretty pathetic excuse for not squatting lol. If you don’t want to squat, just say so, you don’t have to grasp for a medical excuse.


#4

No.

I love sumo deadlifts, but they’re not even close to something that can replace squatting variations.


#5

Lots of things can replace the squat for hypertrophy, like csulli listed above. Nothing can replace it for making you more awesome.


#6

Just do front squats and slow concentric leg presses. You’ll get all the hypertrophy you’re looking for.


#7
  • No, sumos do not hit the quads as much as squats.
  • As a result your proposed plan is a bit weak wrt quads:
    sumos (hamstrings, glutes)
    walking lunges (mostly glutes but depends on stride length)
    1-leg leg press (quads, hamstrings)
    leg curls (hamstrings)
  • So if you really insist on skipping the squats you need to make sure to hit the leg-press hard and/or throw in some leg extensions.

#8

Trap bar dead lifts tend to mimic the squat closest IMO. It’s basically the same movement but with the weight in your hands (overly simplified).


#9

I run a 4x a week 5/3/1 with Sumos on the second day and squats on the fourth. Personally, and it may be different for everyone, butI always have much greater hip soreness and fatigue on sumo days whereas squat days leave my hamstrings and, to a lesser extent, quads sore. Deadlifting in general just seems a different movement altogether since it’s hip hinging versus squatting.


#10

You may want to consider higher-rep stiff-leg/romanian deadlifts with good form for awhile (i.e., no back rounding and hinging just at the hip), to get a better feel for recruiting your posterior chain. Once you get a good feel for how that feels in your hamstrings and glutes, you can attempt to adjust your squat form so you reproduce that feeling.


#11

6 hours horse stance


#12

[quote]c.m.l. wrote:
6 hours horse stance[/quote]

haha! with the compulsary joss stick!


#13

Although I can understand the reason a lifter might choose to prioritize other movements over squat variations, not including them as an auxiliary movement seems short-sighted to me.


#14

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]Jnatural wrote:
Can Sumo deadlift actually replace squat in a hypertrophy legs workout?
[/quote]
I wouldn’t credit sumo deadlift with being able to replace squats for any purpose, but least of all hypertrophy. If you want leg hypertrophy without squatting do leg press and leg curls and leg extensions and hack squats and lunges and whatever the hell else.

For what it’s worth though, “anterior pelvic tilt” is a pretty pathetic excuse for not squatting lol. If you don’t want to squat, just say so, you don’t have to grasp for a medical excuse.[/quote]

THIS!!! I stopped doing squats strictly for longevity purposes. Squats have destroyed my back for too long and I have talked to a few pro’s who have completely cut them out after suffering too many disk related issues. I know… I know… Squating is worshipped but as far as being able to function well in the future without daily back pain, I have decided to stick to hacks, lunges, and extentions. Too much spinal compression for my taste.


#15

Why are people always trying to find ways to get out of squating or justify not squatting? If you dont want to squat, dont squat. Just dont pee on sombody and call it rain with your reasoning.

Not directed soley at you OP, just in general.


#16

It really shouldn?t matter if you could replace 1 thing with another. Build a program that will lead you to your goals. Make sure you are hitting all the muscles in a variety of ways. No need to absolutely have to include any 1 thing. Evaluate the completeness of your program, not the substitute-ability of exercises.


#17

[quote]Waittz wrote:
Why are people always trying to find ways to get out of squating or justify not squatting[/quote]

Rationalizing their deficiency?


#18

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:

[quote]Waittz wrote:
Why are people always trying to find ways to get out of squating or justify not squatting[/quote]

Rationalizing their deficiency?
[/quote]

Does not compute.


#19

Thanks for the answers…!! As I said above I did squat for 2-3 years, until I had the low back pain, therefore I don’t need to find an excuse to replace squats, it’s just an health question.
Sincerely I am close to hate leg press, especially the horizontal leg press (I don’t know why it’s annoying for my knees)and I recently known the 45 degree one it’s broken in my gym -.-

Indeed if you tell me a way to do squat the same I will enjoy this one… what about to do squat with more slow and controlled motion and more wide stance (also known as sumo squat)?? Can help for my situation??


#20

[quote]BlueCollarTr8n wrote:
Although I can understand the reason a lifter might choose to prioritize other movements over squat variations, not including them as an auxiliary movement seems short-sighted to me. [/quote]

This means something like do squat the same but not as first exercise??