T Nation

Sucralose vs. Real Sugar

Recently I’ve heard from people I know that sugar substitutes like Splenda and SweetnLow cause an insulin spike because the pancreas cannot tell the difference between sucralose and real sugar, does anyone know whether this is true?

That goes against the scientific information I’ve read on Sucralose.

If this was the case, I don’t think diabetics would be able to use it, and from what I’ve seen they have no problems with it.

There have been articles stating that it will increase insulin. However, like HK said if that were the case diet sodas would wreak havoc on diabetics.

Any time something comes out to threaten the sales of sugar, there will be bad press.

Kind of like General Mills doing studies showing eggs are bad for us.

The only info like that I’d read was that your body ended up treating some things like sugar because they taste sweet, and your body is used to releasing insulin when it tastes sweet. Mind over matter type of thing.

Also read that it’s not the insulin spike that ends up being the problem with some of those sweeteners as they turn into some pretty weird stuff once they’re metabolized.

Drop both from your diet.

I went through a phase of using a shit-tonne of splenda and I looked and felt like ass.

[quote]HK24719 wrote:
That does against the scientific information I’ve read on Sucralose.

If this was the case, I don’t think diabetics would be able to use it, and from what I’ve seen they have no problems with it.[/quote]

I thought most diabetics couldnt produce insulin, therefore would it be a problem to them. Obviously if insulin is needed to metabolise sucraose, they’d have a problem.

[quote]Boffin wrote:
HK24719 wrote:
That does against the scientific information I’ve read on Sucralose.

If this was the case, I don’t think diabetics would be able to use it, and from what I’ve seen they have no problems with it.

I thought most diabetics couldnt produce insulin, therefore would it be a problem to them. Obviously if insulin is needed to metabolise sucraose, they’d have a problem.[/quote]

not in all cases. Some people will produce insulin but the body no longer responds to it as it should. Meaning insulin doesn’t pull sugar out of the bloodstream.

Animal studies have results in both directions as to whether artificial sweeteners affect the body’s appetite mechanism and/or affect insulin release.

My conclusion from the various studies I’ve read is that most likely there is an effect at least with regard to the appetite mechanism, though not an effect that will be detected in all study protocols.

In other words, if your system (so to speak) frequently experiences meals that taste as if they have a great deal of sugar in them, resulting in an “expectation” that much more caloric energy has been consumed than is actually the case, followed by the system learning that in fact the apparently-

satisfactory meal in fact did not meet needs, then after many repetitions of this the system may not any longer assume that a meal contains as many calories as it in fact does, in those cases where the meal isn’t artificially sweetened.

So it probably is not a good idea to consumer artificial sweeteners in mass quantities. But on the other hand, I doubt that – and there’s no evidence to show that I know of – that occasionally consuming an amount of artificial sweetener that would correspond to a mere 100-150 calories of sugar, or whatever, is going to have any such adverse effects on reprogramming the appetite system.

So for example I don’t worry personally about having 12-16 oz Diet Coke every now and then, though generally preferring unsweetened drinks for the above reason.

By “real sugar” you mean the shitty processed stuff labeled “sugar” on the igredients list, right?

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
Animal studies have results in both directions as to whether artificial sweeteners affect the body’s appetite mechanism and/or affect insulin release.

My conclusion from the various studies I’ve read is that most likely there is an effect at least with regard to the appetite mechanism, though not an effect that will be detected in all study protocols.

In other words, if your system (so to speak) frequently experiences meals that taste as if they have a great deal of sugar in them, resulting in an “expectation” that much more caloric energy has been consumed than is actually the case, followed by the system learning that in fact the apparently-

satisfactory meal in fact did not meet needs, then after many repetitions of this the system may not any longer assume that a meal contains as many calories as it in fact does, in those cases where the meal isn’t artificially sweetened.

So it probably is not a good idea to consumer artificial sweeteners in mass quantities. But on the other hand, I doubt that – and there’s no evidence to show that I know of – that occasionally consuming an amount of artificial sweetener that would correspond to a mere 100-150 calories of sugar, or whatever, is going to have any such adverse effects on reprogramming the appetite system.

So for example I don’t worry personally about having 12-16 oz Diet Coke every now and then, though generally preferring unsweetened drinks for the above reason. [/quote]

what are your thoughts on the health affects of artificial sweeteners? Specifically aspartame because I don’t believe there’s much info on toxicity of other artifical sweeteners.