T Nation

Styles in Boxing

As I’ve been popping my head in threads here and there I have seen a lot of input and also questions regarding different styles of boxing ie; cuban style,russian style,european and so on… I myself is looking to innovate and learn the difference in their styles (posture/offense/defense)

As someone that trains out of your every day boxing gym in the US I dont have the leisure of training with a world class trainer or being able to travel to different countries to learn their art (as most of you are the same im sure!)

That’s why I’ve decided to make a thread to see what people have to say on the forum regarding their styles.

  For example, what's the difference between your common "everyday" hook you see in boxing to a cuban hook?

Or how’s the footwork and guards different from a russian to mexican?

I’ve tried to do some searching on google and youtube but not much has came up.
For anyone to throw some knowledge on here is much appreciated not just to me but I am sure a lot of other people.

I’m really interested in this but have nothing to contribute… But I’ll be watching this thread.

How long is a piece of string?
This topic could invite an encyclopedia of discussion.

The textbook was written as standard. Everyone started with the same blueprint.
Style is an expression of the soul.
Boxing is influenced by personality, demographics, cultural and economic variables, the history of pugilism within that country, the fashionable fighting style of the day and a myriad of other intangibles.

There is a basic set of techniques. Once you master those, you will subconciously adopt your own particular style.
This could be a wonderful thread and I will glady contribute what I can. However, we need, context, focus and topic to start.

So, basically…

What do knowledgeable people associate with geographic labels? How does a ‘Cuban’ boxer fight compared to a Russian, a Brit, a German? We are obviously talking anbout sterotypes to some extent. The only thing I have to offer is that Germans have been said to excessively round their shoulders forward as a deflective measure; I may be wrong though.

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
So, basically…

What do knowledgeable people associate with geographic labels? How does a ‘Cuban’ boxer fight compared to a Russian, a Brit, a German? We are obviously talking anbout sterotypes to some extent. The only thing I have to offer is that Germans have been said to excessively round their shoulders forward as a deflective measure; I may be wrong though.[/quote]
Nice question.

Cuban boxers are genereally considered to be fleet footed technicians- ice cold on the offense. That is the stereotype.
In my experience of cubans, most box flat footed, but their movement is sublime. We must remeber that the Cubans that box outside of their country are the creme de la creme… coming from a terrific fighing infrastructure.
I have seen Rigondeaux train, spar anf ight first hand. The defense seems to be based primarily on movement, with a good defensive lead shoulder protecting the chin. The rear foot is distinctly to the rear and the front shoulder elevated. Rotation and angles are often sought by way of the rear foot, so as not sacrificing ground.

The British are often chalked down as the stereotypical European style. Very vertical, looking for long straight shots- the primary proponent of the 1-2. One note I must take on the British is that they are advocates of the static - or physical - defences. The parry, block, lever guard, the catch and the sweep were all traditionally in the brits armoury- and remain. In my opinion the British amateurs are among the best schooled in the world. Of course, for such a large nation there are huge diversities… Junior Witter is British and Martin Murray is British… where is the similarity?
One thing I’ve found with the English is that genetically they are a strong hard hitting people. I would go as far as to say they are stronger than my own people, but not matching us in grit.
For me the British have the best jab in the world.

The German style- for me was mastered by Felix Sturm; an unpopular but beautiful fighter. From mainland Europe I feel the represent the best in inside fighting. Stereotypically what one would expect is a high tight guard, with flat feet- primarily moving forward and looking to use the jab as a battering ram, to force the opponent to the ropes before unloading 3s and 4s. The German style is slower than many in terms of movement, but they cut the ring superbly and their hands move in flurries. It suits professional boxing and leave me with the somewhat insensitive metaphor of a tank slowly grinding its way towards a gory victory.
I think Germans- and I think uppercuts and hammering hooks with the knuckles faced toward the opponent.

The Russians… sinister speed, immaculate technique and terrific work ethic. Russians are the great whites of the boxing ocean. Opponents are prey and with the exception of the enigma Dimitry Pirog they seem to be aggressively minded. From first hand experience they seem to attack the body to open up the head.
They switch between head and body so smoothly it is a beauty to behold.
Many fighters do this by sacrificng the quality of their shots, but the Russians adjust from the feet and the corrections are so autononomous, they must drill them for endless hours.

[quote]donnydarkoirl wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
So, basically…

What do knowledgeable people associate with geographic labels? How does a ‘Cuban’ boxer fight compared to a Russian, a Brit, a German? We are obviously talking anbout sterotypes to some extent. The only thing I have to offer is that Germans have been said to excessively round their shoulders forward as a deflective measure; I may be wrong though.[/quote]
Nice question.

[/quote]

Nice answer :slight_smile:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:

[quote]donnydarkoirl wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
So, basically…

What do knowledgeable people associate with geographic labels? How does a ‘Cuban’ boxer fight compared to a Russian, a Brit, a German? We are obviously talking anbout sterotypes to some extent. The only thing I have to offer is that Germans have been said to excessively round their shoulders forward as a deflective measure; I may be wrong though.[/quote]
Nice question.

[/quote]

Nice answer :slight_smile:

X2 on a great post…I would like to hear your comments, if you have any experience, on Asian boxers, especially the South Koreans. Thanks

[quote]idaho wrote:
Nice answer :slight_smile:

X2 on a great post…I would like to hear your comments, if you have any experience, on Asian boxers, especially the South Koreans. Thanks

[/quote]
Hey brother;

I’ve never actually boxed any Asian fighters.
I watched some in the last Olympics and they seem to be developing really well. Professionally Asia has some outstanding fighters- but curiously they range from incredibly technically astute, to just the brute force like Poonsawoot Kratidaengym.
Juan Manuel Marquez trained extensively in Japan, which is not surprising as Lopez was such a phenom out there before him.
If JMM got plenty of sparring out there, they must have some cracking fighters.

I won’t comment on other countries as the us has many different styles in each state!

new York: more attrition fighters. Good cardio warriors. High guard get to give.

Philadelphia: their a little more slick, then the new Yorkers, but they still like to bang with the best. The like to get under punches call this rolling think Joe Frazier.

Michigan: the slickest of the three I am going to mention. In Michigan they use lead shoulder to deflect rear hand attacks. Alot of people call this the Philly shell, but it came from Michigan. Is it a coincidence that mayweather and James Toney use the basic defensive positioning?

mostly in the us we gotten away from being rounded and focus on ether being all the why in ( flat footed ear muffs) or out fighters, who can’t fight on the inside. There are still a few trainers that know their stuff. Vegas has some great trainers. Also I am trying to establish our gym as a play to get quality boxing training

wait a minute…

No love for my Mexican hermanos???

Mexican Fighters. Tough as nails. True Aztec warriors who love fighting and who embody a culture of “machismo”. Mexicans fighters are ALWAYS offense first, and defense second. They are defined as they are willing to take your best shot for an opportunity to land theirs. And they do it with BRUTAL BODY PUNCHING.

Mexican fighters like to fight inside, and are adept going to the body with both hands. Mexicans fight flat footed, sometimes squaring up inside to let both hand go. Hooks, uppercuts and short overhands are favored up close. Many Mexican will simply block and parry shots and the outside along with bobbing and weaving to get into range to exchange.

Conditioning and volume punching are also hallmarks of Mexican fighters. Regardless of their physical appearance, Mexican fighters are usually in great shape and are able to unload loads of punches through the fight. To usually be successful against a Mexican fighter, a strong jab is required along with mobile footwork to keep you from the corners and off the ropes. If a strong Mexican fighter can continue to put you in these spots, it can be a bad night for you.