T Nation

Study to Boost Muscle in Older Adults

Interesting (though check the source of funding!) I wonder what the results will be.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., July 29 – The University of Alabama at Birmingham issued the following news release:

Can a nutritional supplement used for wound-healing also help build muscle in older adults? Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Department of Nutrition Sciences are taking a hard look at an over-the-counter supplement that might help seniors avoid age-related muscle loss.

“As we age, we lose muscle mass and muscle function, losing both quantity and quality of muscle,” said Barbara Gower, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences and co-lead investigator of a study looking at the potential role of Juven, a supplement drink made of three amino acids.

Juven, manufactured by Abbott Laboratories, is a blend of two amino acids - arginine and glutamine - along with a metabolite of the amino acid leucine. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. The three in Juven are particularly associated with rebuilding tissue following surgery or treatment of wounds or pressure ulcers.

Gower and co-investigator Amy Ellis, MPH, RD., a doctoral student in UAB’s Department of Nutrition Sciences, are looking at the potential for Juven to boost muscle mass and function in seniors between the ages of 65 and 89. People interested in participating in the trial should e-mail aellis04@uab.edus or call 205-975-9629.

Trial participants will drink the fruit-flavored supplement, or a placebo beverage, twice a day for six months. MRI imaging will be used to see if there is a change in muscle mass. Tests of physical strength and function will help determine if the drink helped improve the overall ability of muscles to function.

“Although we get these amino acids from protein foods like meats and dairy, seniors are unable to absorb or utilize amino acids from protein foods as well as younger people,” said Ellis. “This study will help us see if supplementation of certain amino acids can help preserve or build muscle in seniors.”

Age-related muscle loss is a significant issue in an aging population, particularly in Western societies in which reduced physical activity and increased life spans are common. Gower says age-related muscle loss is a leading factor in an older person’s ability to live independently, and is linked to an increased risk of falls and fractures.

Funding for the study came from the National Institute of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the UAB Center for Aging. Abbott Nutrition provided the supplement.

It should be noted that what might work in old ppl might not work in young ppl. Case in point, as the article states one of the main contributory factors to age related loss of muscle mass has to do with declining ability to assimilate aminos. This is not (usually) a considerable problem for younger people.

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:
It should be noted that what might work in old ppl might not work in young ppl. Case in point, as the article states one of the main contributory factors to age related loss of muscle mass has to do with declining ability to assimilate aminos. This is not (usually) a considerable problem for younger people.[/quote]
True,
but I sometimes feel old after a session!

[quote]Boffin wrote:

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:
It should be noted that what might work in old ppl might not work in young ppl. Case in point, as the article states one of the main contributory factors to age related loss of muscle mass has to do with declining ability to assimilate aminos. This is not (usually) a considerable problem for younger people.[/quote]
True,
but I sometimes feel old after a session![/quote]

More sad news, I saw a study recently that said that creatine and protein supplements don’t work for old people :frowning: You can ship me your remaining supplies. PM me for the address :stuck_out_tongue:

LOL!

[quote]Boffin wrote:

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:
It should be noted that what might work in old ppl might not work in young ppl. Case in point, as the article states one of the main contributory factors to age related loss of muscle mass has to do with declining ability to assimilate aminos. This is not (usually) a considerable problem for younger people.[/quote]
True,
but I sometimes feel old after a session![/quote]

dude, you probably ARE old both before and after lifting. I was born in '55, i’m old too. So? from the look of your avatar, you probably look better than most of the guys at your gym. what are you going to do, quit because of some egg-head study? I’m with BPT, send me all your protein powder and BCAAs, because I have no intention of not using them, even after the skinny/fat guys in the lab coats tell me they are not helping me.

[quote]PDJD wrote:

[quote]Boffin wrote:

[quote]BulletproofTiger wrote:
It should be noted that what might work in old ppl might not work in young ppl. Case in point, as the article states one of the main contributory factors to age related loss of muscle mass has to do with declining ability to assimilate aminos. This is not (usually) a considerable problem for younger people.[/quote]
True,
but I sometimes feel old after a session![/quote]

dude, you probably ARE old both before and after lifting. I was born in '55, i’m old too. So? from the look of your avatar, you probably look better than most of the guys at your gym. what are you going to do, quit because of some egg-head study? I’m with BPT, send me all your protein powder and BCAAs, because I have no intention of not using them, even after the skinny/fat guys in the lab coats tell me they are not helping me.[/quote]
Well yes, I guess I’m old before and after, but I dont feel old before (not always after either, especially if there was a PR) anyway I’m not old in comparison to some, I was born in '59
BTW the avatar is cleverly posed to hide my gut! :wink: