T Nation

Study I found on Casein Hydrolysate


#1

This is a study I found that concerns the use of casein hydrolysate in exercise and dieting, specifically of overweight police officers which is of no concern. Anyhow, the study showed that casein hydrolysate kicked whey hydrolysate's butt in terms of effectiveness. I'm not sure how well this would carry over into the real world of bodybuilding where the people using the different proteins are well-trained and very in-shape, but, nonetheless, the study was interesting.

"We compare the effects of a moderate hypocaloric, high-protein diet and resistance training, using two different protein supplements, versus hypocaloric diet alone on body compositional changes in overweight police officers. A randomized, prospective 12-week study was performed comparing the changes in body composition produced by three different treatment modalities in three study groups. One group (n = 10) was placed on a nonlipogenic, hypocaloric diet alone (80% of predicted needs). A second group (n = 14) was placed on the hypocaloric diet plus resistance exercise plus a high-protein intake (1.5 g/kg/day) using a casein protein hydrolysate. In the third group (n = 14) treatment was identical to the second, except for the use of a whey protein hydrolysate. We found that weight loss was approximately 2.5 kg in all three groups. Mean percent body fat with diet alone decreased from a baseline of 27 +/- 1.8 to 25 +/- 1.3% at 12 weeks. With diet, exercise and casein the decrease was from 26 +/- 1.7 to 18 +/- 1.1% and with diet, exercise and whey protein the decrease was from 27 +/- 1.6 to 23 +/- 1.3%. The mean fat loss was 2. 5 +/- 0.6, 7.0 +/- 2.1 and 4.2 +/- 0.9 kg in the three groups, respectively. Lean mass gains in the three groups did not change for diet alone, versus gains of 4 +/- 1.4 and 2 +/- 0.7 kg in the casein and whey groups, respectively. Mean increase in strength for chest, shoulder and legs was 59 +/- 9% for casein and 29 +/- 9% for whey, a significant group difference. This significant difference in body composition and strength is likely due to improved nitrogen retention and overall anticatabolic effects caused by the peptide components of the casein hydrolysate. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel"

I personally thought that there was probably not going to be a huge difference in effectiveness between any fast-digesting protein like whey isolate or anything faster especially whey and casein hydrolysate, but this experiment says otherwise. What do you guys think? Would the results of this experiment be reproducible in the bodybuilding world? I kinda wish that the study listed the amount of subjects used in each group.


#2

Well, you have to take EVERY study with a grain of salt, but all-in-all…thanks for sharing your find! It IS definately very interesting. Im sure everyone else will be more interested when Tim and TC release Anaconda and MAG-10.


#3

[quote]rholdnr wrote:
Well, you have to take EVERY study with a grain of salt, but all-in-all…thanks for sharing your find! It IS definately very interesting. Im sure everyone else will be more interested when Tim and TC release Anaconda and MAG-10.[/quote]

And I am not taking the study too seriously since it was only one study, and it didn’t list the amount of test subjects at all.


#4

Hmnnn I tend to read everything I can find on anything that may pique my interest, however it is always encouraging when the antecodtals starts coming in. Yes, I know it’s not very scientific (placebo effect anyone?), but it does factor in when you consider spending money on supplements. With the certain supplements though, I’m curious whetehr it’s going to be cost effective for products to come to market.

A guy I talk to runs a supplement company and he was saying that so many company’s don’t actually put what they claim to in their products (big surprise), simply because they would not be able to turn enough of a profit. I guess that’s really the final word in this industry.

(I’m still anticipating playing with some Casein Hydrolysate though).

S