T Nation

Structural Imbalances- Good Trainer

On the latest Charles Poliquin article, he mentions a good trainer will focus on the trainees “structural imbalance issues.” Thus, attacking or addressing the structural imbalances of the athlete first. As an example, Poliquin mentions that he didn’t have the shot putter power snatch until his shoulder issues were addressed.

How do you find a quality trainer who can address these issues? I’d love to get a good opinion on my own imbalances. Any certifications or something I should look for in a trainer who can do the same with me? (by the way, I live in the SF Bay area)

Look up Gray Cook and the Functional Movement Screen (FMS). It’s the gold standard for trainers to assess clients in finding imbalances.

However, I’m one of those people that feel that most people don’t need to go to extremes in correcting imbalances mainly because they tend to be undertrained to begin with. So just by training properly, you will automatically correct most imbalances.

That’s why it’s important to push (horizontally and vertically), pull (horizontally and vertically), twist, lunge, squat, deadlift and run (sprint).

Muscle imbalance for better performance has not been perfected, and is only truely realized when injury happens for right now. In general leg imbalances are recognized quicker because squatting has been analyzed so much.

The best trainer to find for muscle imbalance is an experienced trainer/therapist. The more clients they’ve had the more they see how a particular weakness effects a movement. If you have a specific imbalance you think you have say a shoulder, then look for a shoulder therapist that has dealt with alot of clients.

Nowadays you can try looking through ART, Massage Therapist, or Chiropractors. If you find one, sometimes they will work with a team of other types of therapy. Good luck it’s hard for non pro athletes.

[quote]Nate Dogg wrote:
Look up Gray Cook and the Functional Movement Screen (FMS). It’s the gold standard for trainers to assess clients in finding imbalances.

However, I’m one of those people that feel that most people don’t need to go to extremes in correcting imbalances mainly because they tend to be undertrained to begin with. So just by training properly, you will automatically correct most imbalances.

That’s why it’s important to push (horizontally and vertically), pull (horizontally and vertically), twist, lunge, squat, deadlift and run (sprint).[/quote]

Couldn’t have said it better myself. I was going to mention Cook, but last I checked he wasn’t out on the West coast practicing (haven’t checked in a while).

Same could be said Nate for stretching. Most people sit too much so focusing on those muscles that are prone to tighten will fix the majority of people.

[quote]ghost87 wrote:
On the latest Charles Poliquin article, he mentions a good trainer will focus on the trainees “structural imbalance issues.” Thus, attacking or addressing the structural imbalances of the athlete first. As an example, Poliquin mentions that he didn’t have the shot putter power snatch until his shoulder issues were addressed.

How do you find a quality trainer who can address these issues? I’d love to get a good opinion on my own imbalances. Any certifications or something I should look for in a trainer who can do the same with me? (by the way, I live in the SF Bay area)

[/quote]

I assume everyone has imbalances or recruitment issues and work corrective issues into their first few programs. This works out well because most people DO have some imbalances or muscle recruitment issues.

Trainers who have been trained by the Poliquin principles will focus on identifying and fixing these first as would many experienced trainers. You can probably tell by watching them train a couple of client or looking over some of their programs. If you never see a corrective movements there’s a good chance they don’t focus on this.