T Nation

Strength Training Program, Prilepin's Table


#1

Looking to go on a strength training programme, for example using prilepins table. The problem I have had in the past is, do I hit the same rep perimeters for each lift (big 3) in the same week. So for example on a Monday ill deadlift but if its a heavy day lets say 3 reps within the same week i struggle to hit that same rep range with my other lifts as I'm a little burnt out. Should I tailor my programming so the week i do a heavy lift on one compound lift i don't go that heavy on my other lifts?

Hope that makes sense..


#2

Prelipin’s tables provides a framework for planning the intensities and volumes of an exercise. You can then take this framework, and extrapolate to determine how you will use it for multiple lifts and how you will plan the layout of multiple workouts throughout the week and month. For a beginner, I recommend starting with a frequency of 2sq/3bp/1.5dl per week and depending on the individual, build up to 3sq/4bp/2dl over around 16 weeks. Workouts that are the cornerstone of training include:
65% 4-5x4-6
OR
70% 4-5x4-5
OR
75% 4-7x2-4
OR
80% 4-7x2-3
OR
80% 2x3+85% 3x2


#3

IME Prilepin’s table is an incredibly useful tool but it has to be modified somewhat for the power lifts. Generally I’ve found the squat to be about dead on, some ranges too low for the bench press and some too high for the deadlift. Experiment and see what works for you.


#4

[quote]IronAbrams wrote:
IME Prilepin’s table is an incredibly useful tool but it has to be modified somewhat for the power lifts. Generally I’ve found the squat to be about dead on, some ranges too low for the bench press and some too high for the deadlift. Experiment and see what works for you.[/quote]

Yeah, I’ve noticed the same with the bench. Have to get more volume in.

Pooley, you could stagger your percentages almost like the Cube method. But as the meet gets closer, you want to peak all three lifts in a more linear fashion.


#5

If I am not mistaken, the table was created from observational data of weightlifters training the snatch or clean and jerk in a single session and looking at barspeed and missed lifts. These were full time lifters training 6 days a week, multiple times a day. They were most likely training the snatch every day and clean & jerk at least 3x a week.

The fact that people have successfully adapted it for training slow lifts 1x a week seems like a conicidence; the only relevance I see is perhaps confirmation of the inverse relationship between volume and intensity and simply having ranges to consistently shoot for (and improve upon).