T Nation

Strength Ratios?

Are there any good resources for strength ratios regarding various bodyparts or exercises? There is an awful lot of talk about balances/imbalances, but very little in the way of what balance should be acheived. I am looking for info like what kind of ratio should you have between the flat bench and the row, or quad vs. hamstring strength. Thanks in adavance for any info.

I seem to recall something like 3:4:5 for the bench to squat to deadlift ratio.

Mike Boyle said in a recent article that you should be able to DB row about 80% of your DB bench. I guess his views aren’t always popular, but this is the only figure I can give you off the top of my head.

I don’t know that the number be so precise. Try ro train in relatively similar volumes/intensities for opposing muscles and you should be fine.

If you need to bring one up, concentrate on that one for a while.

I think Isaac Newton would have done well at resitance training. He invented the notion that every action needs an equal and opposite reaction.

I’m not saying that your opposing muscles should all have equivalent strength, but the strength of effort should be equal.

If you are not putting as much effort into your rows as you do your benches, then obviously there’s going to be problems.

Don’t look for magic numbers, because they’ll differ from person to person and area to area.

Later,
Scott

http://exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/DeadliftStandards.html

not exactly what you’re looking for, but useful nonetheless.

[quote]texass wrote:
http://exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/DeadliftStandards.html

not exactly what you’re looking for, but useful nonetheless.[/quote]

That’s pretty cool. I’m intermediate/advanced for the 181 class. Good deal.

[quote]BackInAction wrote:
texass wrote:
http://exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/DeadliftStandards.html

not exactly what you’re looking for, but useful nonetheless.

That’s pretty cool. I’m intermediate/advanced for the 181 class. Good deal. [/quote]

well hell even better in off the damncharts in nnear everything. To bad those #'s dont mean a damn thing in the real world. hell Id be a friggin olyimpian or some shit.

[quote]Phill wrote:
BackInAction wrote:
texass wrote:
http://exrx.net/Testing/WeightLifting/DeadliftStandards.html

not exactly what you’re looking for, but useful nonetheless.

That’s pretty cool. I’m intermediate/advanced for the 181 class. Good deal.

well hell even better in off the damncharts in nnear everything. To bad those #'s dont mean a damn thing in the real world. hell Id be a friggin olyimpian or some shit.

[/quote]

in the real world–what freakin world do you live in. Those are respectable #‘s for gym goers. This whole–gotta do 3x bw for dead to be like average’–bullshit on here is ridiculous. Or should we go back to that infamous deadlift thread where everyone and their little brother was deading 500+ at 170lbs.

I’m 275 and I deadlift a couple little plates over 600. That puts me solid in the advance and elite a ways away. And I can honestly say, there aren’t a whole lotta guys at my gym doing over 600lbs—regardless of weight.

[quote]wfifer wrote:
I seem to recall something like 3:4:5 for the bench to squat to deadlift ratio.

Mike Boyle said in a recent article that you should be able to DB row about 80% of your DB bench. I guess his views aren’t always popular, but this is the only figure I can give you off the top of my head. [/quote]

Yeah, I remember seeing an article about the beginner/intermediate/advanced lifter that had the intermediate at 300lb bench 400lb squat and 500lb dead.

I’m not on the Mike Boyle bandwagon, but most of what he does is pretty standard and common sense. He just get’s a bad rep for doing ‘functional’ training with his athletes. He still uses a fair amount of PL/OL in his routines.

I think it’s great advice to have a balanced push/pull ratio in your routine, and if you are a beginner, you are fortunate enough to be able to start that way and continue to train that way. But for those people who have overdeveloped one muscle group or another over the years, it would be useful if someone had some acceptable ranges for chest:back, bi’s:tri’s, quads:hams, etc.