T Nation

Strength of Samson and Biblical Nutrition

Anyone read them? Any good results? The author of Strength of Samson, Mike Brown, seems like a decently read guy- a bearded biblical scholar version of Brooks Kubik, I suppose. Rich Tucker, the author of Biblical Nutrition, apparently suggests fasting, amongst other craziness. Anyone into this? I’ve found no reviews on the books, but they’re available at www.superstrengthbooks.com

Samson’s strength was supernatural, the secret of it was his covenant with God shown by his hair, when he gave away the secret for a piece of a**, he broke his covenant and the strength went bye bye.

So if I let my hair grow,will I have supernatural strength?? :slight_smile:

No, Samson was a judge over Israel, and he was suppose to lead them and deliver them from the Philistines. He did some amazing feats of strength, but these were all attributed to God’s power working in him. There is no way to duplicate those feats of strength without God’s intervention. If your interrested also check out David’s mighty men, because their feats of strength were also amazing. (2 Samuel 23:8-23)

George

You have got to be kidding me…

Exploitation of religion for commercial purposes: you gotta love it. If you believe this crap, I have a bridge to sell you.

[quote]Leafblighter wrote:
You have got to be kidding me…

Exploitation of religion for commercial purposes: you gotta love it. If you believe this crap, I have a bridge to sell you.[/quote]

If only we could all be as enlightened and sure of everything as you. A lot of information on this board is crap also. A lot is useful. Perhaps something could be learned from it that would help you with your own goals. OPEN the mind.

The authors both seem at least somewhat credible. I take it no one’s even heard of these books. To the above poster- I really don’t think this is exploitation of religion. It’s more like a Christian version of the Warrior Diet, I think.

[quote]Leafblighter wrote:
You have got to be kidding me…

Exploitation of religion for commercial purposes: you gotta love it. If you believe this crap, I have a bridge to sell you.[/quote]

Exploitation of religion!?!?! How dare they!

I have both books.

The jist of Biblical Nutrition is more intriguing, and probably a little more tolerable to read: eat twice a day (only when hungry), eat natural foods, never eat til you’re full, chew slowly so as to make the food more digestible. The author then goes into details regarding the foods that would have been eaten by the characters in the Bible.

The Strength of Samson is a little nutty, if only because the author’s viewpoints are so out there. He varies from chapter to chapter, from sample workouts to how he feels regarding sexual activity while training to the dangers of some supplements. He backs up some of his views with evidence, other views no.

Overall, both are really interesting reads. I think just in terms of gaining more information and opening your mind, it would be worth it to buy the books.

[quote]shogunassassin wrote:
The authors both seem at least somewhat credible. I take it no one’s even heard of these books. To the above poster- I really don’t think this is exploitation of religion. It’s more like a Christian version of the Warrior Diet, I think.[/quote]

I could write the best damn nutrition/training book in the history of the world. The moment I slap a religious reference on it in order to sell it, is the moment I am exploiting religion for commercial purposes.

The bible is not a manual on training or nutrition. Unless you’re an orthodox jew, it has absolutely zero business being referenced on these issues and any tenuous connection is purely marketing driven.

[quote]klutz782 wrote:
I have both books.

The jist of Biblical Nutrition is more intriguing, and probably a little more tolerable to read: eat twice a day (only when hungry), eat natural foods, never eat til you’re full, chew slowly so as to make the food more digestible. The author then goes into details regarding the foods that would have been eaten by the characters in the Bible.

The Strength of Samson is a little nutty, if only because the author’s viewpoints are so out there. He varies from chapter to chapter, from sample workouts to how he feels regarding sexual activity while training to the dangers of some supplements. He backs up some of his views with evidence, other views no.

Overall, both are really interesting reads. I think just in terms of gaining more information and opening your mind, it would be worth it to buy the books.[/quote]

So you mean eat healthy natural foods? And a balanced diet containing things like fruit, nuts fish oil, and complex carbs?

This is a breakthrough!!!

Someone PM Berardi. Quick.

[quote]Leafblighter wrote:
shogunassassin wrote:
The authors both seem at least somewhat credible. I take it no one’s even heard of these books. To the above poster- I really don’t think this is exploitation of religion. It’s more like a Christian version of the Warrior Diet, I think.

I could write the best damn nutrition/training book in the history of the world. The moment I slap a religious reference on it in order to sell it, is the moment I am exploiting religion for commercial purposes.

The bible is not a manual on training or nutrition. Unless you’re an orthodox jew, it has absolutely zero business being referenced on these issues and any tenuous connection is purely marketing driven.
[/quote]

While I see your point, I disagree. From my cursory examination of the text, it appears that it is the Old testament being used, and that it is used as a historical text, rather than a religious one. Utilizing the Bible in such a way does not constitute exploitation, any more than does reading the Vedas for instruction on building a mercury vortex engine.

[quote]brucevangeorge wrote:
klutz782 wrote:
I have both books.

The jist of Biblical Nutrition is more intriguing, and probably a little more tolerable to read: eat twice a day (only when hungry), eat natural foods, never eat til you’re full, chew slowly so as to make the food more digestible. The author then goes into details regarding the foods that would have been eaten by the characters in the Bible.

The Strength of Samson is a little nutty, if only because the author’s viewpoints are so out there. He varies from chapter to chapter, from sample workouts to how he feels regarding sexual activity while training to the dangers of some supplements. He backs up some of his views with evidence, other views no.

Overall, both are really interesting reads. I think just in terms of gaining more information and opening your mind, it would be worth it to buy the books.

So you mean eat healthy natural foods? And a balanced diet containing things like fruit, nuts fish oil, and complex carbs?

This is a breakthrough!!!

Someone PM Berardi. Quick.
[/quote]

The book was published, if memory serves, in the 1970’s. Furthermore, as I understand it, there’s a great deal of treatment given to the act of chewing as the first step in digestion, a topic rarely, if ever, touched on in most nutrition texts.