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Strength Numbers for Wrestlers

Does anyone have any strength numbers for Olympic wrestlers ? This is just a curiosity thing. I wanna see what the ratio between push and pull power is for wrestlers.

Thanks.

They are just fucking strong and have perfected technique to a level that takes over a decade to achieve. Period.

Their push-pull ratio probably varies greatly, but they could probably put you to shame in any physical endeavor. The sheer mental intensity of an Olympic wrestler alone could probably pin you, let alone his push-pull ratio. They wouldn’t know what the fuck you were talking about if you asked one what their ‘push-pull’ ratio was.

[quote]KombatAthlete wrote:
They are just fucking strong and have perfected technique to a level that takes over a decade to achieve. Period.

Their push-pull ratio probably varies greatly, but they could probably put you to shame in any physical endeavor. The sheer mental intensity of an Olympic wrestler alone could probably pin you, let alone his push-pull ratio. They wouldn’t know what the fuck you were talking about if you asked one what their ‘push-pull’ ratio was.[/quote]

This is about as correct as you can get. Though I’m still curious.

lol what do you mean by push-pull ratio? And I’m sure they are prettyyy damn strong. Kombat Athelete to say they can beat “you” in any physical endavour isnt true though. Who knows he could be squatting more, and automatically makes him not better in any physical endevour. Either way I rather be an olympic wrestler than be able to squat a bit more lol.

How do you think Rulon Gardner’s lifts would compare to the Russian he beat to win his Olympic gold? I don’t think he would be close. Granted, Rulon is not your typical olympic wrestler. I have seen some high school wrestlers do incredibly well through technique even when they lacked strength. However, what makes an olympic champion is when the technique and strength (and desire) meet.

[quote]dbutkus wrote:
How do you think Rulon Gardner’s lifts would compare to the Russian he beat to win his Olympic gold?[/quote]

There’s actually some controvery as to whether or not Rulon really beat Karelin. Karelin destroyed Rulon earlier that year (I think he may have teched him) and reportedly Karelin received a huge sum of money after the olympics. Some people say that having Rulon lose was a ploy to revive wrestling in the U.S.

Aleksander Karelin is up there as one of the best athletes in history. God only knows how strong he was. To quote him, “I train every day of my life as everyone else has never trained a day in theirs.” Considering he threw around resisting 280 pound men like toys I’d bet his lifts were impressive.

http://video.google.fr/videoplay?docid=-7670518349034223468&q=karelin

[quote]Donut62 wrote:
Aleksander Karelin is up there as one of the best athletes in history. God only knows how strong he was. To quote him, “I train every day of my life as everyone else has never trained a day in theirs.” Considering he threw around resisting 280 pound men like toys I’d bet his lifts were impressive.[/quote]

ah the Karelin lift! Tossing grown men over his head like ragdolls for fun. Once carried his new refrigerator up several flights of stairs to his apartment, by himself.

[quote]Donut62 wrote:
Aleksander Karelin is up there as one of the best athletes in history. God only knows how strong he was. To quote him, “I train every day of my life as everyone else has never trained a day in theirs.” Considering he threw around resisting 280 pound men like toys I’d bet his lifts were impressive.[/quote]

He was able to clean and press 420 pounds, and his incredible strength did not prevent him from running 3000 meters in less than 11 minutes. He was also very flexible. He should be an exemple for every “would-be” strength athlete, wrestler or not.
I would be very glad to learn about the way he trained. Russian athletes have always been amazing.

[quote]dl- wrote:
lol what do you mean by push-pull ratio? And I’m sure they are prettyyy damn strong. Kombat Athelete to say they can beat “you” in any physical endavour isnt true though. Who knows he could be squatting more, and automatically makes him not better in any physical endevour. Either way I rather be an olympic wrestler than be able to squat a bit more lol.[/quote]

I meant that an Olympic wrestler could probably pound for pound outlift you, outrun you, do more push-ups/pull-ups than you, and humble you in almost any athletic endeavor. Even if they wrestled you and intentionally held back their strength, they could shred almost anyone to pieces with technique and fluid movements alone.

I have been privledged enough to meet some Olympic wrestlers and the level of mental intensity they convey just talking to you is mind-blowing. Chris Bono’s speech terrified as many kids as it did inspire, due to his utter intensity. Both Olympic wrestlers I met had been traning seriously for well over a decade by the time they got to that level. Starting when Kendall Cross was a kid (literally a kid) he used to wake up before dawn to train before school.

Ok there Kombat Athlete…calm your self-righteous ass right the hell down. How’s about you re-read my fucking question, or hell, read it for the first time instead of jumping down my throat.

I am fucking fully aware that a national, collegiate or Olympic wrestler is a physical freak who can out-perform me. What I was curious was wether or not a wrestler is stronger in terms of pulling lifts or pushing lifts in general.

In my estimation, based on the fact that much of wrestling, especially Greco-Roman, is pulling-oriented that lifts like the deadlift and barbell rows would be higher than millitary presses and bench pressing. Of course, I’d have wanted to hear something to back my belief up or contradict it; either would do.

Before you go furthur with your spiels, I do in fact wrestle. Not with a university or college team; I wrestle with a club. I realize I am several steps down the ladder skill-wise. However, I have some idea how much of a physical specimin a college or national-level wrestler is.

What prompted my question is all the rope-climbing and pulling-oriented lifts that my coaches emphasize when we lift. I was just wondering if my assumption that, pound-for-pound, a wrestler’s pulling lifts would be higher than their pushing lifts is correct.

Oh and btw, Kombat Athlete, I have met a few National-level and collegiate-level champs. Though I have not been privledged enough to meet an Olympian. I know all about how they don’t try and they wreck you. I have wrestled guys who I could not move, could not snap his head down, couldn’t even make him budge on the mat, let alone turn him or pin him. Their base was just so solid, it was scary. They throw you, break through your sprawl…they move you around like it’s nothing. It’s scary to think they aren’t trying.

I, as I stated earlier, wrestle and aspire to do something as humble as to win some local open tournaments. I played football instead of wrestled in high school; big mistake, but I did pick up the sport about a year ago. I basically have fallen in love with it. I started out with BJJ and did wrestling to help my BJJ, but I grew to love wrestling more and more.

I appologize for snapping on you. It was a long day at work, so again, my appologies.

I have seen D1 Runner up Jason Robinson of Edinboro working with 275 in the clean.
I have seen brian stout of clarion 4xAA doing speed reps with 275 in the clean.
I have seen marc coleman, during his NCAA days, repping with 495 in the deadlift.
I have seen the Brands brother do about 50 chins in a row, pretty erratic and jumpy form but they still did them.
I have seen Randleman do 500lbs for reps in the squats about a week before NCAA’s.
Wrestling is a fucked up sport in that because of the huge variations in technique and style, you can have guys like above but then have an olympic champ like john smith or kendall cross who struggle with 135 in the bench (albeit not a very sport specific lift but still a good indicator of general strength).
Most wrestlers, such as I have observed in national level guys like Dan Mayo, are so fucked up from wrestling for decades, that they work more on anaerobic endurance than maximal strength. Usually, high level wrestlers are genetically very powerful guys, or because of the aforementioned injuries, can’t really handle or don’t handle the heavy weights. Mayo would rather do reps with 225 for time, then max out with a heavy single or triple. He was already pretty strong and needed to work on his power endurance since in wrestling, as in all sports, there is a ceiling on the effectiveness of maximal strength development.
I heard angle could bench in the high 400’s as a heavy weight at clarion.
Mark Johnson, now head coach at illinois, could curl 225 for 10 reps.

Orange, than you for that info. That’s what I was looking for.

A wrestler needs to have explosiveness and power more-so than pure strength like a powerlifter. Who is more explosive and athletic than an Olympic weightlifter ? Yet, I have seen an old Greco-Roman USA World’s team training manual. It had like 4x20 reps. Why ? Can anyone explain this to me ? At rep 12-15 out of 20, especially on fairly heavy squats, most people’s form goes to shit. Also on things like power cleans, there is scientific proof that going past 6 reps or so is not beneficial.

Cleans, high pulls, front squats, power snatches, overhead squats, millitary and push presses, jumping shrugs and so on (which are easy to learn compared to a full Oly lift with catch and all) with sets of like 8x2, 3x3, 5x5 or 10x3 would be a better.

This teaches explosive power because, well, you can’t NOT explode through a clean, for example. Also, you don’t lose the form and therefore compensate with the wrong muscle groups. In addition, 60 seconds of rest with a program like this is pretty fatiguing pretty quickly, endurence-wise, from personal experience.

These are just my ideas…being naturally strong and explosive plays a big role, no doubt.

Well, im not a physical spesifiman by any means, but…

3rd year wrestler
17 years old
5th at Ofsaa
12th at canadian nationals

I have a 1.5x BW Bench
2X BW Squat/Dead
1.2x BW PowerClean
@72kg

Dunno if that helps any but like I said, there are guys out there that are insane. Look at Evan Macdonald, probably lb for lb one of the biggest wrestlers ever and hes canadian :slight_smile:

Rookie, whereabouts do you wrestle ? I wrestle in Missisagua with Matmen.

Evan McDonald is one thick mofo.

I wrestle out of St.Pats high school up in North western ontario (thunder bay) I was the 64kg qualifier for NWOSSAA.

[quote]t3h_Squirr3l wrote:
Orange, than you for that info. That’s what I was looking for.

A wrestler needs to have explosiveness and power more-so than pure strength like a powerlifter. Who is more explosive and athletic than an Olympic weightlifter ? Yet, I have seen an old Greco-Roman USA World’s team training manual. It had like 4x20 reps. Why ? Can anyone explain this to me ? At rep 12-15 out of 20, especially on fairly heavy squats, most people’s form goes to shit. Also on things like power cleans, there is scientific proof that going past 6 reps or so is not beneficial.

Cleans, high pulls, front squats, power snatches, overhead squats, millitary and push presses, jumping shrugs and so on (which are easy to learn compared to a full Oly lift with catch and all) with sets of like 8x2, 3x3, 5x5 or 10x3 would be a better.

This teaches explosive power because, well, you can’t NOT explode through a clean, for example. Also, you don’t lose the form and therefore compensate with the wrong muscle groups. In addition, 60 seconds of rest with a program like this is pretty fatiguing pretty quickly, endurence-wise, from personal experience.

These are just my ideas…being naturally strong and explosive plays a big role, no doubt. [/quote]

The training parameters you mentioned would build more explosive power. But the training paramters they used with teh squat would develop killer muscular and anaerobic endurance, which is equally important in wrestling. In my experience, like you mentioned, high-level wrestlers are naturally very explosive and really benefit mroe from working on conditioning than pure strength.

Also, at the Olympic level I think all of the players have developed maximal strength to as high a level as would be beneficial. For example, I know a 133 lber that can bench 350. Benching 400 might not really benefit him on the mat, but developing even an even higher lactate threshold may.

With regards to the push-pulling, I think it might be about equal. It is likely that there is tremendous variety just based on past programming- I don’t think the ratio really makes a difference as long as you are damn strong either way.

Kombat Athlete,

Thanks for the reply and input. Lactate threshold training is a very good idea at a high level. However, for a low-level mofo such as myself I think strength and explosiveness are a good idea along with technique. Let the wrestling drills and scrimmages condition you, I say.

Bah, just my ideas. I dunno, weight lifting has really made me improve my wrestling because I can focus on my game instead of getting bullied by a guy who is stronger.