T Nation

Strength Gear/Training Advice

I need some advice into getting proper gear for strength training so I don’t injure myself. I have around 2 years of lifting experience, however was off 2 years and have only recently been lifting again for 2 months. I’m in the process of researching strength programs to follow, and need any advice on proper gear to use to help prevent any injury or help in the training process.

Looking at a few things, belts seem to be popular at my gym. Also erector shirts seem like a handy tool to keep back straight in deadlifts and squats. I saw some powerlifitng videos of powerlifters taking ammonia capsules also, is there any harm to taking these? They seem like a good tool to help push out sets when you become fatigued. Any info you could direct me to for strength gear and training would be helpful thanks.

I would personally stay away from most of that stuff, unless that day you are aiming for a PR. I use gloves on deadlifts as chalk is frowned upon, that’s all. Looking around my own gym, belts are worn to set of your teeny waist. People are doing machine pulldowns belted, fer chrissake!

I would however supplement with creatine, a good protein, fish oil and minerals.

Ammonia? If it’s you last lift in PL meet…

TQB

Disclaimer: I am really not that experienced. Many here knows much more…

[quote]shizen wrote:
I need some advice into getting proper gear for strength training so I don’t injure myself. I have around 2 years of lifting experience, however was off 2 years and have only recently been lifting again for 2 months. I’m in the process of researching strength programs to follow, and need any advice on proper gear to use to help prevent any injury or help in the training process.

Looking at a few things, belts seem to be popular at my gym. Also erector shirts seem like a handy tool to keep back straight in deadlifts and squats. I saw some powerlifitng videos of powerlifters taking ammonia capsules also, is there any harm to taking these? They seem like a good tool to help push out sets when you become fatigued. Any info you could direct me to for strength gear and training would be helpful thanks. [/quote]

erector shirts are worthless. You want to keep your back straight then strengthen you back and abs. a belt is fine to help keep your posture and pressure on the heaviest sets.

Ammonia capsules are unnecessary. I take them at meets only. They make you a bit more alert but only briefly and there are long term effects of continued usage.

Overall, the rawer and cleaner you train the better you will be for it. suits, shirts, belts ammonia etc are all tools PL use to move more weight on a particular day. the gear itself is not what makes them stronger over the long run and shouldn’t be used as a crutch.

Most PLs, even the multiply guys, do a lot of raw or near-raw training. Gear goes on mostly to learn the equipment for use in a meet and in some cases to offer protection on those rough days.

if you plan on competing get a suit, shirt, belt and wraps and learn how to use them and learn to cycle back and forth from raw to geared lifts. Otherwise just buy a belt maybe some elbow sleeves and wrist wraps and save the rest of your money for something more worthwhile

[quote]robo1 wrote:
shizen wrote:
I need some advice into getting proper gear for strength training so I don’t injure myself. I have around 2 years of lifting experience, however was off 2 years and have only recently been lifting again for 2 months. I’m in the process of researching strength programs to follow, and need any advice on proper gear to use to help prevent any injury or help in the training process.

Looking at a few things, belts seem to be popular at my gym. Also erector shirts seem like a handy tool to keep back straight in deadlifts and squats. I saw some powerlifitng videos of powerlifters taking ammonia capsules also, is there any harm to taking these? They seem like a good tool to help push out sets when you become fatigued. Any info you could direct me to for strength gear and training would be helpful thanks.

erector shirts are worthless. You want to keep your back straight then strengthen you back and abs. a belt is fine to help keep your posture and pressure on the heaviest sets.

Ammonia capsules are unnecessary. I take them at meets only. They make you a bit more alert but only briefly and there are long term effects of continued usage.

Overall, the rawer and cleaner you train the better you will be for it. suits, shirts, belts ammonia etc are all tools PL use to move more weight on a particular day. the gear itself is not what makes them stronger over the long run and shouldn’t be used as a crutch.

Most PLs, even the multiply guys, do a lot of raw or near-raw training. Gear goes on mostly to learn the equipment for use in a meet and in some cases to offer protection on those rough days.

if you plan on competing get a suit, shirt, belt and wraps and learn how to use them and learn to cycle back and forth from raw to geared lifts. Otherwise just buy a belt maybe some elbow sleeves and wrist wraps and save the rest of your money for something more worthwhile[/quote]

I totally agree. Get some knee sleeves if you’re gonna be doing alot of squatting. I use the Tommy Konos and I love them. Alot of people swear by Rehbands too.

Although it’s fun to think about all the cool gym gear you can buy you really don’t need anything except solid footwear and comfortable clothes. Having a belt and wrist straps on hand for max squat and deadlifts is a good idea but don’t use them till you need them. Otherwise they can become crutches. Save the fancy stuff until you’re training to compete.

I lift APF and use all of the gear I can in meets. Canvas suit, power pants, open back shirt, etc.

I would make these recommendations:
#1 If you have been lifting for 2 years, you are not ready for the jacked gear. Give it another couple of years.
#2 Unless you are going to do a meet, most of the stuff is not wortk the money.

The only exceptions would be:
Knee or elbow sleeves.
A good belt.
Wrist wraps for squatting (if you rack the bar low)
Powerpants, (like compression shorts) if you squat wide, but not super tight.

About 2/3 of my training is done either gearless or with only relatively loose Powerpants and a belt.

Smelling salts are no different then your training partner yelling at you, or getting slapped. If it helps great, but as you get more experience, you won’t need the help to find the proper mind set.