T Nation

Strength Focused Mesocycle


#1

This seems a little odd to me...

I a weak little shit and my lifts are really light, for example my weighted dip is only 30lbs for 7 reps and my 7 rep chin up is 10 lbs, so this would mean that i would only increase my dip by 0.75 lbs the after the first week, and my chin would go up only 0.25 lbs, leading to really low increases in these lifts by the end of the 4 week mesocycle... i don't get this, how am i supposed to gain strenght if i'm only allowed to increase in such small increments?? should i factor in my bodyweight??


#2

You wrote this back in September:

Why is someone like you training the way that you are with this type of mentality? You are that weak...but you want to avoid mass gains? Why? Why are you on a strength mesocycle when your lifts are less than most athletic high school students? Why would someone that weak not want more muscle on them? Do you understand that you wouldn't be that weak if you gained some muscle?

How much do you weigh, how tall are you and how old are you?


#3

You also DONT just use the added wieght on chins and dips. Your body weight is part of the total load. soy say you increse 5% then its 5% of YOU and the 10 lbs added or 10.5lbs.


#4

no i didn't right this in septmember.

I don't wanna gain mass cuz i play soccer and that would hurt my endurance.

The to the second poseter... thanks for replying, should this incorporation of body weight be done for other lifts like front squat, box squat, lunges and others that involve pushing up ur body wieght, but not for lifts like standing military press and floor press etc??
What about good mornings... should i just factor in like half my body weight, cuz i'm only really pushing up my upper body when doing this exersise...
thanks


#5

But if you are really light which you probably are then it wouldn't affect your endurance. Also football is far more about anaerobic fitness than aerobic. Fast recovery is more important than endurance.

WHat height weight are you? I almost guarantee you could do with gaining a solid stone of mass or probably even more before you were a suitable weight for football. Skinny guys get duffed out of the way. THe best players now are big and strong as well as fast, think of Adriano, Drogba etc.


#6

You can click on your name and it brings up all of your post. You either wrote it or someone using your log in password wrote it.

Have you seen the legs on some of those pro soccer players? They obviously aren't that fearful of gaining any and all muscle mass. How old are you and how much do you weigh? Your endurance will come from your training. Your lack of strength will also make you less effective. No one has recommended that you need to become a professional bodybuilder, but you are weak especially for someone who claims to be active.


#7

in september i posted that i want to gain strength and not mass and was searching for a routine that would help me accomplish this.... This post (if u can read) is asking about how to set up the 2.5% increases in weight on the SFM...
Soccer players have large legs due to the amoutn of soccer they play... NOT from training for hypertrophy. I know i'm weak, thats why i'm trying to gain strength, u don't have to be a jerk about it. ?I'm 140 lbs and 5 ft 8 and a half inches.


#8

thats not very big man. I am 5'8 and I ran 10.7 seconds in the 100 hand timed, 11.18 FAT at a weight of 142 lbs, I also ran a 4.5 40 at that weight and during the summer I lifted my ass off seriously, went up to 160 (leveled down to 155 after my GPP for track) and ran a legit 4.38 at my college combine open to all athletes on campus, the fastest one there.

The added weight WILL help you, take it from me, granted I am not very big still, but I still managed to gain 18 lbs of muscle. I'm not going to gain anymore since we are getting into the thick of training but once my offseason begins again I am going to try to bulk up to 170 during the summer so that way I can be 160 after GPP since my coahces said that would be my ideal weight to be at.


#9

Who has been a jerk about it? Several people HAve now told you that gaining some muscle won't hurt you, but will help you. What is with these fuckers that jump on this board and get pissed if you tell them what they don't want to hear?


#10

listen don't call me a fucker, u've been an ass ever since ur first reply to this thread... i've seen ur other posts, u think ur tha shit and know everything, but really ur just a pompous ignoramus.


#11

also think about it, added wieght does not make u faster or increase ur endurance... it's the strnegth that comes with it. If anything adding bulk makes u slower. All sprinters and most atheletes will tell u that RELATIVE strength is far more important that absolute strength which comes with added mass.


#12

Bro, don't be afraid to gain some size with the strength. you're only slowing down your progress by avoiding weight gain. Added mass and strength will definitely help. Besides, if it doesn't it will come off really easily. Have you ever looked at olympic sprinters? Tell me that the extra mass they gain from strength training didn't make them faster.


#13

But you don't even have "relative strength".


#14

gaining muscle mass will always make you stronger relative to your weight unless it's mostly sarcoplasmic gains versus with little myofibril growth or accompanied by alot of fat increase.

so training exclusively for pure hypertrophy would be foolish.you need to train for mixed strength-hypertrophy and maybe cycle in sub-maximal or maximal strength training to stimulate a high level off fiber recruitment with the new mass gains.
that's all i have to say.


#15

I used to think the same as you as I was a wrestler and was all hyped out about 'relative' strength. You need to not be skinny to be strong; having excessive mass and being 5'8 140 lbs are two completely different things. I acutually used to be 5'8 135 myself and not strong at all, primarily cause I was into all this relative strength stuff.

I am now 5'9 165 and much 'relatively' stronger than I was at 135. I do not have 'excessive' mass, I am just no longer a skinny bastard. Neural efficiency is only worth training for if you have a decent level of mass. I am also much faster than I was before.


#16

Gain weight, get stronger. I used to LOVE Bruce Lee..and like..I would always think tyo myslef I don't want to be more than 130-135 pounds...and was like..SET on just being that weight forever...until I looked in the mirror..like I was pretty strong for 130 pounds..pretty damn good relative strength..but like...

i looked in the mirror, looked at a bunch of Pride FC and UFC fighters..and was like...DAMN wtf am i thinking...GO EAT NOW!...so I just started eating like crazy training hard...NOW its much better and I still want to gain more weight..just cause you are stronger, faster, more powerful, AND once you reach a good weight just work on endurance..trust me you might think..no and all..but it'll defiantly be worth it..DO NO SHY AWAY!!

dl-


#17

Yes added mass makes you slower, but NOT if it is functional mass. In order to get stronger its a hell of a lot better to add more muscle mass. The strength gains will make your relative strength increase as the mass gains will be small in comparison to larger strength gains. If your squat goes from 200 pounds to 300 pounds you seriously think you would go from 140 pounds to 210? The only people who should ever want strength gains without mass gains are people training to be in a weight class. You won't start hypertrophy training and suddenly explode like Ronnie coleman and not be able to run up a flight of stairs.

What height are you?


#18

If adding functional mass makes you faster, wouldn?t adding no weight or minimal weight make you even faster? For example, in running a bulked-up body gives a runner more power, but also more weight and as a result more inertia to overcome. You don?t have to be training for a weight class; the object in weightlifting for most athletes should be increasing their strength to bodyweight ratio.


#19

No, it isn't. That may be a goal in bodybuilding simply because the strength usually follows mass gains. The object in weightlifting is to lift the damn weight. If there are no weight classes, there is no need to worry about your "ratio". Some of you have taken this thought process too far. The guy is 140lbs and WEAK. It isn't like he has superhuman strength at that weight. No one really cares if a 135lbs man can bench 225lbs. While possibly "impressive", it means nothing in and of itself. Sure, they may be "relatively strong" compared to the 250lbs guy who can bench 405lbs...but 405lbs is still a heavy weight. I would rather be able to bench close to 500lbs at 250lbs than only weigh 135lbs and only capable of pressing 225lbs.

The ONLY time this matters is for weight classes. Otherwise, your overall strength is the ONLY thing that matters in weightlifting.

If you are a skinny weak mutherfucker, quit trying to make everyone believe you are so "relatively strong". No one cares unless you are truly stronger than most people.


#20

If you get bigger, you will get stronger. NOw, abut getting slowr, this will happen if you train exclusively for size but if you also train fro strength, it will not happen.