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Strength/Conditioning Routines for MMA?

hey does anyone have some good strength routines for mma?? and maybe some good conditioning ones as well

Open mouth.

Insert shotgun.

There is a search box, with that said:

5/3/1 varaition for MMA

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:
Open mouth.

Insert shotgun.[/quote]

Good enough for Hemingway…

To the OP,

There is a search function for specifically this reason.

Past that, assuming you are both A.) asking in earnest, pun intended, and B.) actually open to advice instead of merely looking for confirmation.

Give us:

1.) Age

2.) Height, Weight, and would you describe yourself as chubby, lean, skinny, well muscled, etc.

3.) Athletic experience outside of MMA

4.) MMA experience: What have you done, how long, fight record, and how are you training now

5.) Lifts and general general physical milestones IF you know them: Not estimated/inflated PR’s on bench, but if you know what you did yesterday that is great. More like your any day measures than personal bests.

6.) What are you doing now for strength and conditioning and do you have any glaring weaknesses. So, “I am fucking weak and loose my grip on a guillotine all the time.” or “I get tired grappling, but not boxing” are good points.

7.) What do you have in the way of access and time to lifting, running. Also, what does your training week look like. Hell, just tell us what you did last week.

Regards,

Robert A

1.) Age

2.) Height, Weight, and would you describe yourself as chubby, lean, skinny, well muscled, etc.

3.) Athletic experience outside of MMA

4.) MMA experience: What have you done, how long, fight record, and how are you training now

5.) Lifts and general general physical milestones IF you know them: Not estimated/inflated PR’s on bench, but if you know what you did yesterday that is great. More like your any day measures than personal bests.

6.) What are you doing now for strength and conditioning and do you have any glaring weaknesses. So, “I am fucking weak and loose my grip on a guillotine all the time.” or “I get tired grappling, but not boxing” are good points.

7.) What do you have in the way of access and time to lifting, running. Also, what does your training week look like. Hell, just tell us what you did last week.

Regards,

1.) Age- 18 turning 19 in 2 weeks

2.) 6’1 weight 188 , lean, well muscle,

3.) baseball, basketball ,track, wrestling highschool varsity, trained boxing for a year with wrestling coaches who are mma fighters.

4.) ive done couple BJJ classes, boxing for a year, Wrestled through high school, little muay thai. i would say half a year for muay thai and bjj boxing for a year and wrestling 4 years. no fights yet going to have smoker fights in summer. training 4x a week mon- morning bjj muay thai
tues off wens- bjj/wrestling and muay thai fri- bjj and muay thai saturday boxing and bjj.

5.) ill give you my PR’s then my average lifts. bench 315 squat 395 deadlift 405. i normally bench 225x10 barbell row 135x25 squat 315x5 shoulder press 135x8

6.) right now for lifting im doing mon- upper body endurance/muscle building tues- lower body endurance/muscle building wens off or HIIT thurs- upper body strength friday lower body strength sat sun might go on a easy run and i normally run in the morning pretty easy no more then a mile. dont have to bad hand strength from holding onto chokes sometimes they slip away but i would say that is from being sweaty i normally get tired after long boxing cardio mostly hitting pads, i have pretty bad shoulder joints.

7.) lifting regimen is above sorry thought it would just be easier to mix that with how i lift for strength and nothing is limiting me for time with weight training or anything i dont have a job yet since school is ending for me but will prob get a part time one during summer.

8.) thank you for putting your time into helping me, i know i could of looked on the site for a routine but i feel it is better to get a routine that fits me personally i guess i can really put one together but its just nice to get input from others thanks dude

simple question.

If you are training with wrestling coaches who are also MMA fighters shouldnt you just work with them if thats your goal? I am sure they are doing something that is beneficial to your strength and conditioning.

[quote]punchedbear wrote:
simple question.

If you are training with wrestling coaches who are also MMA fighters shouldnt you just work with them if thats your goal? I am sure they are doing something that is beneficial to your strength and conditioning.[/quote]
nah bro in high school i use to, now i graduated and finishing off freshman year of college. but to be honest there not weight room strong there just like matured strong, idk if you know what im talking about but i can move heavier weight then they can in the weight room, but when i wrestle with them they feel so strong and heavy but there the same weight

[quote]spyderboys wrote:

[quote]punchedbear wrote:
simple question.

If you are training with wrestling coaches who are also MMA fighters shouldnt you just work with them if thats your goal? I am sure they are doing something that is beneficial to your strength and conditioning.[/quote]
nah bro in high school i use to, now i graduated and finishing off freshman year of college. but to be honest there not weight room strong there just like matured strong, idk if you know what im talking about but i can move heavier weight then they can in the weight room, but when i wrestle with them they feel so strong and heavy but there the same weight [/quote]
That has everything to do with the technique and very little with their PRs.

In all fairness though, since it doesn’t seem like you are going to go and use the search function to look at what happens to these kinds of threads all the time, let me summarize it to you. If you are planning to compete, and you can already squat and dl over twice your bodyweight and bench more than 1.5 your bodyweight, there is no reason to chase higher PRs because if you are really serious about competing you won’t have the time to hit the weights 4 times a week.

Dump atleast 2 of you weightlifting days and replace with MMA/BJJ/MT/what ever as long as it improves your technique and reactions inside the ring. If your current school doesn’t provide possibilities for more than 4 days of training, find a new one, and if that is out of question then shadowbox and do whatever wrestling drills you can, see if you can find someone to train with you occasionally, for sparring and grappling etc.

Bottom line, your lifts are more than enough for anyone planning to compete in MMA you have no need to lift more than you do at the moment what so ever. Focus on technique and skillwork and for weightlifting just do what you can on the remaining one or two session to keep your lifts where they are right now. You have the strength, what you need right now is learn to use it for the sport you desire to be good at.

[quote]Fistiecuffs wrote:
That has everything to do with the technique and very little with their PRs.

In all fairness though, since it doesn’t seem like you are going to go and use the search function to look at what happens to these kinds of threads all the time, let me summarize it to you. If you are planning to compete, and you can already squat and dl over twice your bodyweight and bench more than 1.5 your bodyweight, there is no reason to chase higher PRs because if you are really serious about competing you won’t have the time to hit the weights 4 times a week.

Dump atleast 2 of you weightlifting days and replace with MMA/BJJ/MT/what ever as long as it improves your technique and reactions inside the ring. If your current school doesn’t provide possibilities for more than 4 days of training, find a new one, and if that is out of question then shadowbox and do whatever wrestling drills you can, see if you can find someone to train with you occasionally, for sparring and grappling etc.

Bottom line, your lifts are more than enough for anyone planning to compete in MMA you have no need to lift more than you do at the moment what so ever. Focus on technique and skillwork and for weightlifting just do what you can on the remaining one or two session to keep your lifts where they are right now. You have the strength, what you need right now is learn to use it for the sport you desire to be good at.[/quote]

I have to agree. The kid provided all his information and his lifts look more than solid for what he wants to do.

Maintain that level of strength, which is good for a kid your age, and start increasing on skillwork and endurance.

You see the difference in skill when you wrestle with the other guys - it’s not so much that they’re have “mature strength” (I know what you were getting at), but more that they’re good wrestlers and know how to use the strength they have in concert with their techniques.

It’s the same reason that a great boxer can be 60 years old, not in fighting shape, and still beat a young buck to the punch every time in the ring - efficiency of movement, experience, and the like play a huge role.

So get better at your sports. Look into buying 5/3/1 and adopt the two day a week program laid out by Jim Wendler, or, if you’re happy with what you’re doing and feel you can adapt it to what you want to do, keep on that.

ya alot of people dont understand the (mature strength) unless they wrestle or box, so im glad someone does lol

[quote]spyderboys wrote:
ya alot of people dont understand the (mature strength) unless they wrestle or box, so im glad someone does lol[/quote]

Yea… when I was younger we used to call it “old man strength.”

It normally comes from guys who have been doing physical labor their whole lives, and it’s kind of a bizarre thing where, even though you might be able to out-deadlift or bench press them in the gym, they can lift a piece of cement or a tree’s heavy root-ball, and carry it further and for longer than you can.

You’ll see it in the legs of landscapers, the hand strength of mechanics or metalworkers, etc.

It’s a weird phenomenon.

To Spyderboys,

First, thank you for answering and providing the information. It really makes for better advice. I will also note that it is the difference between Hemingway references and serious answers.

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:

[quote]Fistiecuffs wrote:
That has everything to do with the technique and very little with their PRs.

In all fairness though, since it doesn’t seem like you are going to go and use the search function to look at what happens to these kinds of threads all the time, let me summarize it to you. If you are planning to compete, and you can already squat and dl over twice your bodyweight and bench more than 1.5 your bodyweight, there is no reason to chase higher PRs because if you are really serious about competing you won’t have the time to hit the weights 4 times a week.

Dump atleast 2 of you weightlifting days and replace with MMA/BJJ/MT/what ever as long as it improves your technique and reactions inside the ring. If your current school doesn’t provide possibilities for more than 4 days of training, find a new one, and if that is out of question then shadowbox and do whatever wrestling drills you can, see if you can find someone to train with you occasionally, for sparring and grappling etc.

Bottom line, your lifts are more than enough for anyone planning to compete in MMA you have no need to lift more than you do at the moment what so ever. Focus on technique and skillwork and for weightlifting just do what you can on the remaining one or two session to keep your lifts where they are right now. You have the strength, what you need right now is learn to use it for the sport you desire to be good at.[/quote]

I have to agree. The kid provided all his information and his lifts look more than solid for what he wants to do.

Maintain that level of strength, which is good for a kid your age, and start increasing on skillwork and endurance.

You see the difference in skill when you wrestle with the other guys - it’s not so much that they’re have “mature strength” (I know what you were getting at), but more that they’re good wrestlers and know how to use the strength they have in concert with their techniques.

It’s the same reason that a great boxer can be 60 years old, not in fighting shape, and still beat a young buck to the punch every time in the ring - efficiency of movement, experience, and the like play a huge role.

So get better at your sports. Look into buying 5/3/1 and adopt the two day a week program laid out by Jim Wendler, or, if you’re happy with what you’re doing and feel you can adapt it to what you want to do, keep on that.
[/quote]

I agree with the above for the most part. Your lifts are likely already in the “strong enough” catagory. However technique is always going to be more important. Your description of mat/ring strength means you already have a visceral understanding of why. Additionally, your experience wrestling means you appreciate how you need to balance muscle with making weight.

There have been a few suggestions for 5/3/1 by Jim Wendler. I think this is a good plan specifically because it will allow you to run the program 2-3 days a week and still make progress. This gives you an additional day for skill work/conditioning (pad work, bag work, grappling drills, all can do both here). I will again say that a good place to go with your gym lifts at leat philosophically is to try to make your “Best Day” lifts, meaning PR’s, your “Any Day” lifts, meaning that on any given day barring injury or illness you could work up to a heavy single/double and be at 90% of what you outlined. This ability to do it on any day that ends in Y as opposed to a meet/special occasion seems to yield more “old man strength” in my experience.

What I am going to really stress is that you self identified as having bad shoulder joints. This is troubling to me. I am hoping this is merely a “feels beat up” vs a “had to see the orthopod” kind of bad. At your age you can train through a lot, and not pay the price till later. However by the end of college that may not be the case anymore. It would be advisable to do what you can to avoid future injuries now.

I noticed you did not mention pull ups in your lifting. Pull ups and rows are staples for grapplers, AND help keep shoulders healthy. Also, improper technique in any of lifts can result in cumulative damage. To that end I am going to suggest you get a copy of Starting Strength, both the book and videos. Not because I want you to do the program, but because I think it does the best job of teaching how to bench, squat, overhead press, and deadlift in a way that lets you go heavy injury free.

IMMEDIATE THINGS TO DO
1.)You are a student, so you can get an Amazon Prime account cheap/free and get the discount and free 2 day shipping. Do so if you have not already and order Starting Strength by Mark Riptoe, both the book and DVD’s are worth it. You can also pick up the 5/3/1 book by Jim Wendler from Amazon. If money is tight, still buy both books.

2.)FightinIrish has had a couple threads where he discusses them and in his log you can find some good warm up routines that you should start doing Right The Fuck Now to see if it helps your shoulders.
http://tnation.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/blog_sports_body_training_performance_bodybuilding_log/log_o_the_irish?id=4426206&pageNo=18

You should also read his log to get a sense of what happens when you ignore shoulder pain when you are younger.

3.) We haven’t talked about nutrition, but I am just going to add that almost everyone in the western world could benefit from some supplemental Omega 3’s, specifically EPA and DHA. Our diets really don’t supply enough. The general recommendation for an adult is to get between 1-3 grams per day. At your age it probably wont be an immediate game changer, but I am comfortable in saying it is a good investment in long term health for a ton of reasons. I can expound if you want. One of the most cost effective ways to do this is to just order the Flameout supplement from this website.
http://www.T-Nation.com/store/supplements/Flameout.jsp

If you do the math a full serving gives you the high end of the dose and a half puts you at the low end. When you figure cost for EPA/DHA it is way cheaper to buy Flamout than to get fish oil at Wallmart or a GNC.

This is a Biotest website, but I won’t lie to plug one of their products. Flamout is a GREAT idea for pretty much anyone who is not on blood thinners or suffers from a condition that impedes clotting.

4.) While you are on Amazon buy a collection of stories by Ernest Hemingway. The shotgun thing made me think of him. You are a young man, in college, who fights. This is the perfect time read at least one Great Book over the summer. I recommend the story “Forty Grand”, I know FightinIrish has other preferences on where to start, but I am right on this one. Get a collection that has Forty Grand in it.

Welcome to the forum.

Regards,

Robert A

[quote]Robert A wrote:

4.) While you are on Amazon buy a collection of stories by Ernest Hemingway. The shotgun thing made me think of him. You are a young man, in college, who fights. This is the perfect time read at least one Great Book over the summer. I recommend the story “Forty Grand”, I know FightinIrish has other preferences on where to start, but I am right on this one. Get a collection that has Forty Grand in it.

[/quote]

While I love Hemingway, I’ve got to say that if you’re young and a fighter, you can benefit immensely from reading Sam Sheridan’s “A Fighter’s Heart.”

Probably the single greatest work of nonfiction I’ve ever read, and it’s life changing. Also makes you realize what goes into this game of ours.

thank you both fightingirish and Robert, both of your advice has been great help i will research everything you guys have given me and i will read a book over the summer, i appreciate all of your help, im just a young guy looking for all the answers to use to become the best athlete possible!

[quote]FightinIrish26 wrote:

[quote]Robert A wrote:

4.) While you are on Amazon buy a collection of stories by Ernest Hemingway. The shotgun thing made me think of him. You are a young man, in college, who fights. This is the perfect time read at least one Great Book over the summer. I recommend the story “Forty Grand”, I know FightinIrish has other preferences on where to start, but I am right on this one. Get a collection that has Forty Grand in it.

[/quote]

While I love Hemingway, I’ve got to say that if you’re young and a fighter, you can benefit immensely from reading Sam Sheridan’s “A Fighter’s Heart.”

Probably the single greatest work of nonfiction I’ve ever read, and it’s life changing. Also makes you realize what goes into this game of ours. [/quote]

Fifty Grand.

Shit.

Fifty Grand.

That is the title.

Sheriden’s stuff is great as well. Might be a more accessible choice for a modern reader also. I would defer to you as far as language and generational preference goes.

Hell, I am such an anachronism I carry a clean handkerchief everywhere I go and still like Joseph Conrad.

Regards,

Robert A

[quote]spyderboys wrote:
thank you both fightingirish and Robert, both of your advice has been great help i will research everything you guys have given me and i will read a book over the summer, i appreciate all of your help, im just a young guy looking for all the answers to use to become the best athlete possible![/quote]

No problem.

Welcome to the site.

Regards,

Robert A

[quote]Robert A wrote:

Sheriden’s stuff is great as well. Might be a more accessible choice for a modern reader also. I would defer to you as far as language and generational preference goes.

Hell, I am such an anachronism I carry a clean handkerchief everywhere I go and still like Joseph Conrad.

Regards,

Robert A[/quote]

  1. I carry one also. Just in my car.

  2. I love Joseph Conrad. Especially because English was not his first language. Makes his works even more impressive.

  3. I love Hemingway too, believe it or not I never read 50 Grand. I gotta get on it.

I am reading so many different fucking books right now though, I’m like inundated…