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Strategic Deconditioning

I was wondering how to utilize Strategic Deconditioning if I’m not doing HST. Haycock says HST fully maximizes it’s utility but it seems useful with any training routine.

I’m currently training on most days of the week, in Pavel Tsatsouline style (emphasis on strength at the moment).

Any research or anecdotes on this topic?

Westside takes a break from lifing heavy every four weeks (i think). this isn’t deconditioning tho, just recuperating cns.

Some of the most elite powerlifters take a month long break every year.

I’ve heard of guys who take month to few year long breaks and make a huge comeback (surpassing previous strength and size).

I believe haycock recommends a 9-14 day deconditioning period for HST. you’re right, it will work for any program (nice observation).

If you want to do a different program but follow HST deconditioning strategy, just take a 10-14 day break every six weeks or so.

I’m just wondering whether the body will need less of a break when it’s been training for strength rather than hypertrophy–like a 5 day break or something.

hmmm…

i hadn’t thought of this…

part of me says the break would need to be longer for strength than hypertrophy. sound weird? in a haycock article i read that the reason you train the same muscles rather frequently is because the muscles take shorter time to recuperate, unlike the neurological system (strength, cns?).

there are a lot of adversaries of frequent deadlifting because of it’s cns burnout capabilities (this seems like a strength issue to me).

being that westside takes a “recovery” week every month, i assume that might be a good paradigm by which to construct a regimen. although, the beasts at westside are all heavy juicers (says Simmons).

all in all, i have no clue what the answer may be. and now im curious and wanna know an answer because i appreciate deconditioning and strength training as well as you.

maybe if Charles Staley or another trainer in the know would help us out…

That is an interesting point about deadlifting. How often do most cycle them.

I?ve become addicted to them and would hate to give them up for even a few weeks, but if it leads to greater strength increases then it makes sense.

I presume changing the rep pattern and doing variations (sumo) isn?t enough.

[quote]gar18 wrote:
That is an interesting point about deadlifting. How often do most cycle them.

I?ve become addicted to them and would hate to give them up for even a few weeks, but if it leads to greater strength increases then it makes sense.

I presume changing the rep pattern and doing variations (sumo) isn?t enough.[/quote]

im addicted to deads as well.

most people cycle deads just like all other exercises (it’s mainly elite powerlifters who tend to dead less; for sport-specific reasons, i might add).

if you gave up all intense and voluminous exercises for the posterior chain for a little while im sure you would find more strength gains (deconditioning works almost anywhere, anyhow; think of deconditioning also as a means of de-adaptation).

try different grip widths and hip heights and platforms and racks and concentric speeds (explosiveness) when deadlifting and you’ll find more variation than you want.

as far as cns burnout goes: where there are advocates, there are also adversaries. i personally dont believe what deadlift adversaries say (i was just giving an example).