T Nation

Stop Online Piracy Act


#1

PDF with the text of the bill: http://judiciary.house.gov/hearings/pdf/112%20HR%203261.pdf

This bill would strengthen copyright holders' means to go after allegedly infringing sites at detrimental cost to the freedom and integrity of the Internet.

How do you feel about this bill?


#2

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#3

I don't steal. Doesn't worry me.


#4

This act and others sponsored by the same group are aimed at foreign internet trading sites(Chinese mostly.) They're robbing US blind, e.g.

'The Motor and Equipment Manufacturer's Association estimates that eighty percent of all counterfeit automobile parts imported into the U.S. originate in China or Hong Kong, costing the auto industry over $9 billion per year in lost sales.'

'The U.S. Commerce Department estimates suggest that U.S. companies lose over $1 billion per year of legitimate business due to piracy, while the U.S. Trade Representative calculates that more purchases of legitimate software and entertainment media alone would reduce the U.S. trade deficit with China by $2.5 to $3 billion per year.'

Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Report:

Counterfeiting costs U.S. businesses $200 billion to $250 billion annually(this figure does not include counterfeit and pirated products that are produced and consumed domestically, nor does it include the significant volume of pirated digital products distributed via the Internet.)

Counterfeit merchandise is directly responsible for the loss of more than 750,000 American jobs.

U.S. companies suffer $9 billion in trade losses due to international copyright piracy.

China also manipulates its own currency keeping the Yuan artifically low and therefore giving them advantages exporting these goods.


#5

I wrote my congressman to oppose it. You're welcome.


#6

This act has the potential to radically alter or shut down sites like YouTube, Flickr, 4chan, others, and all new companies that follow.

This act will ruin the internet


#7

http://americancensorship.org/


#8

Write your congressman people....The shit works, believe it or not.


#9

To be continued...


#10

Have you thought about the problem of the theft of intellectual property and trade secrets? I'm going to start a thread on China and I'd be interested in hearing from people who oppose this act. It's all very well to oppose this legislation - I don't know enough about it myself - but no one has addressed the reasons WHY this bill is being introduced, nor have they offered alternative solutions.


#11

Watch this video

If most of what is in this video is true, I'd be very worried.


#12

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.


#13

Consider this: Over 350 major US corporations support the legislation including Pfizer, Ford, Viacom, MacMillan, Revlon etc. And the companies that oppose the legislation are almost all internet companies, many of whom have been prepared to bend to the will of Beijing in the past - although I think their main concern is the decline in revenue that they believe will result if this legislation passes.


#14

Maybe so. I notice that US industry largely supports it though. One of the speakers at the hearing into SOPA cited 17 other countries that have the same IPS blocking legislation in place without any of the dire consequences google, AOL, Ebay etc are predicting.


#15

While it will help with internet piracy....as usual Congress did not read all the FINE PRINT.

Calling its plan a â??market-based system to protect US customers and prevent US funding of sites dedicated to theft of US property,â?? the new bill gives broad powers to private actors. Any holder of intellectual property rights could simply send a letter to ad network operators like Google and to payment processors like MasterCard, Visa, and PayPal, demanding these companies cut off access to any site the IP holder names as an infringer.

The scheme is much like the Digital Millennium Copyright Actâ??s (DMCA) â??takedown notices,â?? in which a copyright holder can demand some piece of content be removed from sites like YouTube with a letter. The content will be removed unless the person who posted the content objects; at that point, the copyright holder can decide if it wants to take the person to court over the issue.

Here, though, the stakes are higher. Rather than requesting the takedown of certain hosted material, intellectual property owners can go directly for the jugular: marketing and revenue for the entire site. So long as the intellectual property holders include some â??specific factsâ?? supporting their infringement claim, ad networks and payment processors will have five days to cut off contact with the website in question.

How in the fuck can you vote for something that gives those kinds of powers out willy nilly.

Jesus.


#16

If a commentor posts a link on a forum to a website that somebody deems unlawful......THEY CAN SHUT THE WHOLE FUCKING SITE DOWN.


#17

The european parliament opposes the bill and it would stand to reason that, if this bill indeed goes through unchanged, many of the big players like Google, Apple and Microsoft decide to move headquarters to europe.

Move TLD's to different DNS servers that are not under US jurisdiction and we'll continue the enjoy the internet without american oversight.

The amount of jobs lost may prove the death knell for the american economy.

Do they really not understand how the internet works or are they just too arrogant to care?


#18

My guess is the former mixed with a little of the latter.


#19

Yes, I work in the industry. It's so not a problem, so this bill is needless. You don't need a ten foot thick brick wall to fix a tiny leak.


#20

What is actually quite funny is that this ten foot thick brick wall is more like a courtesy gate. The method that they would actually use to block these sites, IE preventing your DNS from resolving a site's name (www.T-Nation.com for instance), does NOTHING to stop you from connecting by simply entering the IP address of the site into your browser (128.121.26.68 for T-Nation) from resolving. So for anyone who actually knows how the internet works (those sneaky copyright thieves) this wall does nothing. If you are curious, finding the ip address of any site can be done from pinging the server, or a whois lookup (example site below). This bill could stop 12 year olds from pirating music, but as soon as they google the solution, it becomes useless. An empty gesture

http://www.site24x7.com/find-ip-address-of-web-site.html