T Nation

Stop File-Sharing Or Lose Funding!

Can’t stop file-sharing? Your university could lose funding!

Yes folks, if there were ever any more proof that we have far too many elected officials in the pockets of ruthless corporations, this is it.

http://news.com.com/Politicos+threaten+schools+over+campus+piracy/2100-1028_3-6188887.html?part=rss&tag=2547-1_3-0-20&subj=news

And also:

http://consumerist.com/consumer/worst-company-in-america/congressman-who-took-money-from-riaampaa-says-congress-should-cut-funding-to-colleges-266945.php

So there you have it folks, the companies that happily take to court the elderly, poor, computer illiterate, and dead (yes, they subpoenaed a dead guy and refused to drop the case) are now convincing politicians to punish colleges for their flawed business models.

If this keeps up it will be only a matter of time before copyright infringement is punishable by death and your assets will be seized by the RIAA/MPAA. Good times.

I don’t have a problem with it. Universities should understand the concept of intellectual property.

[quote]Zap Branigan wrote:
I don’t have a problem with it. Universities should understand the concept of intellectual property.[/quote]

As any post-doc or grad student will tell you, they definitely understand the concept of stealing it.

[quote]Zap Branigan wrote:
I don’t have a problem with it. Universities should understand the concept of intellectual property.[/quote]

It’s copyright in this case. Intellectual property domain encompasses copyright laws, NOT vice versa.

[quote]lixy wrote:
It’s copyright in this case. Intellectual property domain encompasses copyright laws, NOT vice versa.[/quote]

But it’s still a species of intellectual property…

[quote]Zap Branigan wrote:
I don’t have a problem with it. Universities should understand the concept of intellectual property.[/quote]

There are also privacy and usefulness concerns. It is not easy to filter out “good” and “bad” stuff, and it sets a dangerous precedent. I don’t want universities censoring content.

Why should universities have to do more than other internet service providers? Make them comply with existing law for ISPs, and that should be sufficient.

[quote]nephorm wrote:

Why should universities have to do more than other internet service providers? Make them comply with existing law for ISPs, and that should be sufficient.[/quote]

Because they are often subsidized by the government and thus the government can ask them to do certain things as a condition to receiving money.

If they don’t want the subsidy they don’t have to comply.

Of course I don’t want to get things too restrictive in this area but it makes sense to at least make the file sharing appear less blatant.

[quote]Zap Branigan wrote:
Of course I don’t want to get things too restrictive in this area but it makes sense to at least make the file sharing appear less blatant.[/quote]

Good idea… all universities should use IP spoofing.

[quote]nephorm wrote:
Zap Branigan wrote:
Of course I don’t want to get things too restrictive in this area but it makes sense to at least make the file sharing appear less blatant.

Good idea… all universities should use IP spoofing.[/quote]

Maybe “third party” proxies in external jurisdictions?

Innocent whistling…

Pull all funding. Now universities don’t have to worry about demands from the government.

[quote]nephorm wrote:
But it’s still a species of intellectual property…[/quote]

Well, the people who prefer to refer to intellectual property in clear-cut copyright cases, are generally trying to amalgamate the issue. That’s why I pointed that out. The generalization is often deliberate (as opposed to an innocent omission) to make P2P sound more serious than it is in reality, and even try to pin it down as criminal.

I have my doubts about Zap’s use of the broad umbrella term “intellectual property”.

I agree file sharing is wrong and they should all have there funding pulled, now if you will excuse me I’m going to go download some songs off limewire.

[quote]lixy wrote:
nephorm wrote:
But it’s still a species of intellectual property…

Well, the people who prefer to refer to intellectual property in clear-cut copyright cases, are generally trying to amalgamate the issue. That’s why I pointed that out. The generalization is often deliberate (as opposed to an innocent omission) to make P2P sound more serious than it is in reality, and even try to pin it down as criminal.

I have my doubts about Zap’s use of the broad umbrella term “intellectual property”.[/quote]

Yeah, why would anyone think that file sharing is criminal. Stupid capitalists!

[quote]Adamsson wrote:
Yeah, why would anyone think that file sharing is criminal. Stupid capitalists!
[/quote]

File sharing isn’t illegal. Distributing copyrighted material is.

[quote]nephorm wrote:
File sharing isn’t illegal. Distributing copyrighted material is.[/quote]

Actually as long as you’re not making money out of it, you could plead fair use. I know that most judges wouldn’t believe that you have thousands of “friends”, but some might :wink:

Most ISP already penalize bittorrent traffic despite the fact that it’s used for perfectly legal downloads. Where is the outrage about that?

[quote]lixy wrote:
Actually as long as you’re not making money out of it, you could plead fair use. I know that most judges wouldn’t believe that you have thousands of “friends”, but some might :wink:
[/quote]

That was the case once, but is no longer. Fair use does not cover the distribution or reproduction of copyrighted material for anything other than individual, personal use.

I guess taking pictures instead of buying postcards should be made illegal too.

And just for the record, file sharing is not stealing like most make it seem. Its just making a copy and distributing it. Its more like counter-fitting but less criminal.

[quote]nephorm wrote:
That was the case once, but is no longer. Fair use does not cover the distribution or reproduction of copyrighted material for anything other than individual, personal use.[/quote]

You mean to tell me that if you borrow a CD from your cousin, that can have the potential of being prosecutable?

Scary country you live in.

[quote]lixy wrote:
You mean to tell me that if you borrow a CD from your cousin, that can have the potential of being prosecutable?

Scary country you live in.[/quote]

If you borrow a CD, no. If you borrow a book, no. If you make your cousin a copy, or your cousin makes himself a copy, that is not covered under fair use. If you make yourself a copy for backup or archival purposes, without breaking any encryption, that is generally fair use.