T Nation

Stone Age Food: Hunters vs Farmers


#1

http://www.jsonline.com/features/health/60002162.html


#2

[quote]florin wrote:
http://www.jsonline.com/features/health/60002162.html

Health care as we know it didn’t exist 3,000 years ago. But along the Georgia coast, the Pacific Northwest, and coastal Brazil, people grew tall and strong and lived relatively free of disease. They ate game, fish, shellfish and wild plants.

But as corn farming spread through various regions of the Americas, people got shorter. Many became prone to anemia and began dying of tuberculosis and other infectious diseases.

“It’s counterintuitive - with agriculture, people should have been better nourished,” said Emory University anthropologist George Armelagos. But a different story is emerging from studies of ancient bones and teeth as well as blood samples from isolated hunters and farmers. And then I found ten dollars.[/quote]

Awesome about the ten dollars, man!


#3

[quote]CBear84 wrote:
florin wrote:
http://www.jsonline.com/features/health/60002162.html

Health care as we know it didn’t exist 3,000 years ago. But along the Georgia coast, the Pacific Northwest, and coastal Brazil, people grew tall and strong and lived relatively free of disease. They ate game, fish, shellfish and wild plants.

But as corn farming spread through various regions of the Americas, people got shorter. Many became prone to anemia and began dying of tuberculosis and other infectious diseases.

“It’s counterintuitive - with agriculture, people should have been better nourished,” said Emory University anthropologist George Armelagos. But a different story is emerging from studies of ancient bones and teeth as well as blood samples from isolated hunters and farmers. And then I found ten dollars.

Awesome about the ten dollars, man![/quote]

LOL?!


#4

<3 Cbear.


#5

This is reality, and reality has been around for a long time. Sadly, it has been buried by the clueless and the opportunist.

I hope the anthropologist is putting on an affectation for the media and our ignorant population. I would rather not think that he has been genuinely surprised - maybe as a kid fed our USDA nonsense, maybe as a regular adult - but not as an anthropologist. But anthropology has been compromised in recent generations.


#6

Cool!


#7

[quote]valiant knight wrote:
This is reality, and reality has been around for a long time. Sadly, it has been buried by the clueless and the opportunist.

I hope the anthropologist is putting on an affectation for the media and our ignorant population. I would rather not think that he has been genuinely surprised - maybe as a kid fed our USDA nonsense, maybe as a regular adult - but not as an anthropologist. But anthropology has been compromised in recent generations.[/quote]

WTF?


#8

good info. Thanks.


#9

I dont understand


#10

[quote]valiant knight wrote:
This is reality, and reality has been around for a long time. [/quote]

Did you steal that line from Michael Scott?


#11

Without corn, there would be no tortilla chips, or worse, they would be made out of that veggie-paste from whole-foods. So, in order for there to be a Mexican palette of food to butcher into Tex-Mex, I’m siding with the ‘corn is awesome’ crowd.

Also, salsa.