T Nation

Sticking Points Articles


#1

Does anyone know any articles regarding how weaker/stronger muscles affect sticking points? ie Bench sticking off the chest usually corresponds to weak pecs. Deadlift sticking point at mid-shin corresponds to weak…

etc.


#2

Dave Tate has a lot of good stuff, …


(goes up to part 7)


#3

Cheers Badger, had a feeling you’d pull through


#4

For raw sticking points also consider technique e.g. tightness, power or how much bar speed you can generate to blast thru and that some sticking points are more or less going to be with you regardless of what you do e.g. out of the hole in squats.

Thinking bigger, stronger muscles for all the muscles involved in the movement is half of it.


#5

This applies just as much, if not more so, to geared lifting.

Maybe this will help:


#6

Ok…but


#7

Cheers, great article


#8

[quote=“j4gga2, post:1, topic:235727, full:true”]
Does anyone know any articles regarding how weaker/stronger muscles affect sticking points? ie Bench sticking off the chest usually corresponds to weak pecs. Deadlift sticking point at mid-shin corresponds to weak…

etc.[/quote]

The Strength Curve

The sticking point in a movement has to do with the Strength Curve. There are three: Descending, Bell Shaped and Ascending.

The Bench Press, Deadlift and Squat fall into the Ascending Strength Curve.

That means you weakest point is the bottom part of the movement: Off the chest in the Bench Press, out of the hole in the Squat and in the Knee are for Conventional Dealifters, off the floor for Sumo Deadlifters.

You increase Strength in the bottom part of those movement but never completely erase them.

Building Strength Out of The Bottom

  1. Bench Press: Heavy Paused Bench Press, Heavy Functional Isometrics off the chest in a Power Rack, Isometric Bench Pressing off the chest in a Power Rack, Pec work.

  2. Conventional Deadlift. Heavy Partial Rack Pulls just below your sticking point in a Power Rack, Heavy Functional Isometric Deadlifts, Isometric Deadlifts and 45 Degree Hip Extension/Back Raises.

45 Degree Hip Extension/Back Raises overload the middle range of this exercise; the middle knee area of the Deadlift.

There are some other exercises that can be use.

Power Training

This is referred to Speed Training.

Training with load of 48 to 62% of your 1 Repetition Max increases the Power you produce in coming off the chest in the Bench Press and off the floor in the Deadlift.

The increase in Power amount getting enough speed up in your car to make it through a mud hole, your Sticking Point.

Kenny Croxdale