T Nation

Sticking Point at Bottom of Bench

Actually I forgot to tell you; if you really want to know how to bench, get some of the benching DVDs put out by Sebastian Burns and Bill Crawford at MetalMilitia.net. I went to a bench workshop put on by Sebastian.

[quote]DJS wrote:
Am I the only one who considers the begining of a lift as not a sticking point? It means its beyond your full rep max.

I have this terrible sticking point at the bottom of a squat. For some reason, I can do 100 lbs more if I quarter squat it. But if i go all the way down i get “stuck”. lol.

[/quote]

LOL good point. I hit a sticking point too when I try to curl 225.

To the OP, You could also experiment with a wider or narrower grip. When I bring my grip in, the sticking point is higher off the chest.

"Am I the only one who considers the begining of a lift as not a sticking point? It means its beyond your full rep max.

I have this terrible sticking point at the bottom of a squat. For some reason, I can do 100 lbs more if I quarter squat it. But if i go all the way down i get “stuck”. lol.

LOL good point. I hit a sticking point too when I try to curl 225."

You’re not the only one; people often try to lift shit that they can’t.

However, there are sticking points; ask EVERY powerlifter. Regardless of how much weight is lifted successfully, there may be a segment of the lift that is the most difficult.

Look at some You Tube clips of Kirk Karwoski squatting. Out of the hole, he’s great. But at midpoint, he has to grind it out. That’s an example of a sticking point. My heaviest one-rep max on the bench was 350 (admittedly not the most impressive bench). The beginning required much grinding; after that, it was cake.

My sticking point for bench is at the 90 degree part, 2-3 inches off the chest. According to that article that means my anterior delts are weak. I can see how that would make sense.

Squat sticking point is the middle, points to weak quads, deads, sticking point is coming off the floor, also points to weak quads. All this makes sense.

I just did my first powerlifting meet last weekend and failed all my third attempts at the above sticking points. Interesting stuff. Thanks for posting that article Evil1

[quote]RMorrison wrote:
My sticking point for bench is at the 90 degree part, 2-3 inches off the chest. According to that article that means my anterior delts are weak. I can see how that would make sense.

Squat sticking point is the middle, points to weak quads, deads, sticking point is coming off the floor, also points to weak quads. All this makes sense.

I just did my first powerlifting meet last weekend and failed all my third attempts at the above sticking points. Interesting stuff. Thanks for posting that article Evil1[/quote]

Im curious.

What were your attempted lifts?.

And at what body weight?.

[quote]Skinless wrote:
RMorrison wrote:
My sticking point for bench is at the 90 degree part, 2-3 inches off the chest. According to that article that means my anterior delts are weak. I can see how that would make sense.

Squat sticking point is the middle, points to weak quads, deads, sticking point is coming off the floor, also points to weak quads. All this makes sense.

I just did my first powerlifting meet last weekend and failed all my third attempts at the above sticking points. Interesting stuff. Thanks for posting that article Evil1

Im curious.

What were your attempted lifts?.

And at what body weight?.

[/quote]

I got 410 on squat, missed 425, got 315 on bench, missed 325, got 445 on deads, missed 465. I was in the 198 raw open division. I weighed in at 186 ( i am teh lazy, didn’t want to cut to 181)

[quote]"Am I the only one who considers the begining of a lift as not a sticking point? It means its beyond your full rep max.

I have this terrible sticking point at the bottom of a squat. For some reason, I can do 100 lbs more if I quarter squat it. But if i go all the way down i get “stuck”. lol.
[/quote]

A sticking point is more of where the speed of the bar moving slows down the most.

If you unrack a weight and get it to the bottom and can’t press it back up… yeah obviously it was too heavy.

But if you can do it a few times while having difficulty at the bottom of the movement (possibly literally feeling stuck for moments)… that’s a sticking point.

The article by CT that was linked earlier in the thread really explains the issue well.

[quote]Bricknyce wrote:

Get the book Bench Monster by Ryan Kennelly or Jim Wendler’s DVD on benching. [/quote]

Are those both worth the money for raw lifters? I thought that was more shirted, comp stuff.

It’s not about shirts much. They’re on how to bench properly and how to get a bigger bench with assistance exercises and program design.