T Nation

Steroids for Athleticism

Obviously steroids can do wonders for lean body mass, but how effective are they for getting stronger, quicker, more powerful, more agile?

I guess what Im getting at is… how much would they improve a basketball player( with intense training and nutrition, of course)? I guess just the ability to train much more often and harder due to the improved recovery would help a lot, but Im really wondering about more than just that effect.

Stronger? Uh, yes. Quicker? If you train for quickness. More powerful? If you train for power. More agile? Doubt it.

ya, EQ is supposed to be the best for sports/endurance which is part of why i took it.

while my endurance is up my agility is way down and my ability to maintain top speed is down as well because I have gained a lot of weight.

you might be better off with something like Beta-7 for basketball.

if you do gear I would recommend a low to med dose of test to help out with recovery and strength. no orals for sure.

[quote]uzzyman wrote:
I guess what Im getting at is… how much would they improve a basketball player( with intense training and nutrition, of course)? I guess just the ability to train much more often and harder due to the improved recovery would help a lot, but Im really wondering about more than just that effect.[/quote]

Interesting topic (hoop was my first love) so I did some digging:

"The NBA had no evidence in 1999 (and we have none today) to suggest even minimal use of steroids or performance-enhancing substances by NBA players.

Indeed, some have suggested that the sport of basketball – which emphasizes quickness, agility, dexterity, and skill above all other physical attributes – does not lend itself to the use of steroids and performance-enhancing substances, which are primarily used to build muscle mass, strength, and endurance."

(http://www.insidehoops.com/stern-steroids-house-reps-051805.shtml)

So it seems safe to conclude that the right AAS could provide a slight edge against average players, but at the elite levels, genetics rule all.

Likely story, we all know Manute Bol was a dbol addict!!!

NBA players are too busy snorting coke to mess with AAS.

I always felt that basketball emphasized height. Maybe some hGH around age 12 through puberty might help.

[quote]razor1208 wrote:
I always felt that basketball emphasized height. Maybe some hGH around age 12 through puberty might help. [/quote]

That sounds dangerous as hell. Not only for the reason I wouldn’t want my kid’s intestines growing super long or him turning out looking like a caveman… but also… For some reason this sparks a memory of a guy in 8th grade who had a full beard and was the only kid who drove to school. He had failed a couple times…

Im surprised that you guys dont think that they would help. It seems like to me if you train for agility and quickness, on AAS your gains would be greater than normal. Not to mention that you would obviously be able to become bigger, stronger, more explosive, etc.

If AAS did not help with athleticism, why would Olympic lifters take them? (Not to mention powerlifters, shotputters, hammer throwers, sprinters etc.) Even for a bber, vertical leap and speed across the court are essential attributes.

[quote]uzzyman wrote:
Im surprised that you guys dont think that they would help. It seems like to me if you train for agility and quickness, on AAS your gains would be greater than normal. Not to mention that you would obviously be able to become bigger, stronger, more explosive, etc.[/quote]

I think everyone agrees about the enhanced recovery aspect.

But the explosive movements (ie. standing vertical leap) that stand to benefit from AAS the most just aren’t very common in the game. More often, you need to be jumping fast and repeatedly.

And do type IIb muscle fibers even contribute to agility and quickness? It seems like these qualities are too subtle to be termed ‘explosive’. Or maybe they just don’t seem ‘explosive’ because they lack an exaggerated stretch reflex. Like those guys who can jump out of the gym even after making no attempt to gather themselves beforehand.

[quote]H-Train wrote:
razor1208 wrote:
I always felt that basketball emphasized height. Maybe some hGH around age 12 through puberty might help.

That sounds dangerous as hell. Not only for the reason I wouldn’t want my kid’s intestines growing super long or him turning out looking like a caveman… but also… For some reason this sparks a memory of a guy in 8th grade who had a full beard and was the only kid who drove to school. He had failed a couple times…
[/quote]

Sorry I was being somewhat sarchastic. Can’t really tell on the board. However, hGH is medically prescribed for adding height to individuals who are not expected to grow to a normal height (pre-growth plate closure.) Actually I believe it is one of the few legitimate uses of the substance.

Also, I remember reading somewhere about parents using it to increase the height of normal sized children, although I cannot recall the source.