T Nation

Staying Motivated at Work?

Ever feel like this sums up your day?

Any tips on staying motivated?

if u r having trouble staying motivated, its time for a career change.

think about what u enjoy, and why it’s not an aspect of ur work.

If there isnt a way to change ur job scope to include something u enjoy doing, then its time for a new job

[quote]yuhui wrote:
if u r having trouble staying motivated, its time for a career change.

think about what u enjoy, and why it’s not an aspect of ur work.

If there isnt a way to change ur job scope to include something u enjoy doing, then its time for a new job
[/quote]

Hell, I wish it were that easy! LOL!

[quote]yuhui wrote:
if u r having trouble staying motivated, its time for a career change.
[/quote]

What? No!
If you are having trouble staying motivated, you might just lack discipline. Changing jobs is unlikely to fix that.

lack of motivation is not a sign that there needs to be change.

http://www.breitbart.tv/html/108653.html

[quote]nephorm wrote:
yuhui wrote:
if u r having trouble staying motivated, its time for a career change.

What? No!
If you are having trouble staying motivated, you might just lack discipline. Changing jobs is unlikely to fix that.[/quote]

Exactly! You’ll switch jobs and lose motivation at that one too.

It’s easy to say change jobs when you live at home or don’t have a mortgage.

ppl dont tend to ‘lose motivation’ doing something they love…

If ur current job isnt giving u the challege or other opprtunities u need to stay motivated, its time to look at other career options

ppl dont tend to ‘lose motivation’ doing something they love…

If ur current job isnt giving u the challege or other opprtunities u need to stay motivated, its time to look at other career options

[quote]yuhui wrote:

If there isnt a way to change ur job scope to include something u enjoy doing, then its time for a new job
[/quote]

life is unfortunately not convenient like that

you take what you can get

[quote]yuhui wrote:
ppl dont tend to ‘lose motivation’ doing something they love…

If ur current job isnt giving u the challege or other opprtunities u need to stay motivated, its time to look at other career options[/quote]

No. They taught me that crap when I was in elementary school, too. Not everyone gets to be a brain surgeon or a fighter pilot. Most people do not get to love their jobs, and it is unrealistic to expect that you will “love” your job. If you are lucky, you get a job that you can tolerate, that you enjoy, that doesn’t make you crazy, and that you can stick with as a career. But we can’t all be Warren Buffet and love our jobs.

And even if you love your job, you still have to put the work in. Work. Which you will not always feel 100% motivated to do, but you have to anyway. That is life, and it is what being a real adult is all about.

[quote]nephorm wrote:
yuhui wrote:
ppl dont tend to ‘lose motivation’ doing something they love…

If ur current job isnt giving u the challege or other opprtunities u need to stay motivated, its time to look at other career options

No. They taught me that crap when I was in elementary school, too. Not everyone gets to be a brain surgeon or a fighter pilot. Most people do not get to love their jobs, and it is unrealistic to expect that you will “love” your job. If you are lucky, you get a job that you can tolerate, that you enjoy, that doesn’t make you crazy, and that you can stick with as a career. But we can’t all be Warren Buffet and love our jobs.

And even if you love your job, you still have to put the work in. Work. Which you will not always feel 100% motivated to do, but you have to anyway. That is life, and it is what being a real adult is all about.[/quote]

Good post!

I agree that it’s unreasonable to expect that you will LOVE your job. But for your sanity I think you should always find at least some part of it rewarding. Spend your time at work trying to do as much of that aspect as possible.

When you work hard you don’t just have to grind out more “reports” per hour like in Office Space, but try to showcase your worth in capacities outside your current responsibilities. It can be frustrating at times, but that’s the only attitude I know how to approach it with.

I absolutely loved this book “It’s Called Work for a Reason” by Larry Winget. I reread it every time I feel like “spacing out” too often.

[quote]nephorm wrote:

No. They taught me that crap when I was in elementary school, too. Not everyone gets to be a brain surgeon or a fighter pilot. Most people do not get to love their jobs, and it is unrealistic to expect that you will “love” your job. If you are lucky, you get a job that you can tolerate, that you enjoy, that doesn’t make you crazy, and that you can stick with as a career. But we can’t all be Warren Buffet and love our jobs.

And even if you love your job, you still have to put the work in. Work. Which you will not always feel 100% motivated to do, but you have to anyway. That is life, and it is what being a real adult is all about.[/quote]

[quote]joesmith wrote:

Ever feel like this sums up your day?

Any tips on staying motivated?[/quote]

Take advantage of your current job in any way possible. Does your employer offer tuition assistance? Use it to take courses that would help you get a job in a different field, or a better job in your current field.

Also try to associate the job with a hobby or interest. By that I mean tell yourself “ok, the job isn’t that great, but it does finance my traveling/car rebuilding/racing/whatever.” I loathe my current job, but I’m able to stick with it for now because it enabled me to finance a movie a friend and I are making. Visualizing the impending success definitely helps me get through the grind of the 9-to-5.

Is wanting and expecting a job you will love idealistic?

Is idealism just another form of naivety?

If all work is work, and all play is play, would the logical conclusion be to pursue the job that will give you the most potential for financial wealth? Wealth that will afford you many freedoms in the “play” area of your life?

Am I just dumb for wanting to be an English Professor a psychology lecturer/researcher?

Do I continue with my business education and try to be a goddamn accountant?

Being idealistic sucks.

[quote]DeterminedNate wrote:
Is wanting and expecting a job you will love idealistic?

Is idealism just another form of naivety?

If all work is work, and all play is play, would the logical conclusion be to pursue the job that will give you the most potential for financial wealth? Wealth that will afford you many freedoms in the “play” area of your life?

Am I just dumb for wanting to be an English Professor a psychology lecturer/researcher?

Do I continue with my business education and try to be a goddamn accountant?

Being idealistic sucks.[/quote]

Well if you have enough experience with psychology you will recall the study that addresses money and happiness. It basically says that as long as you’re above the poverty line more money won’t make a substantial long-term difference. So do what you like (didn’t say love) as long as you’ll be able to afford a home.

Woah… flavadave… ur avatar is very… ummm… interesting :wink:

I have a degree in business science.

Up until a week ago, I had a part time job as a stock boy at a local Office Depot.

Before that, I wasted 4.5 years as a sales associate at one of the worst companies ever ejaculated from the devil’s hate-sack, RadioShack. I was demoted from full-time to part-time because I let my boss know I might be putting in my two weeks notice if I had to move out of state.

Boss reports to district office, per our conversation, he goes to the regional manager. RM says I showed “disloyalty and disrespect.” Took my money. In a phone conversation with him, he repeated this, and told me if I didn’t like it, they could give me three hours, and let me work my way back up to 15, then MAYBE they would consider full time.

I interrupted him, said “Steve, know what? You’re fired.” I hung up. There is one person between him and the acting president of RadioShack. And I fired him.

Within a week, I had a job offer from a certain health supply company about 90 miles from me.

I now make twice as much per year, not counting commissions or bonus, than I ever did with Tandy. I can also expect to add an additional 50% to that with commission, 100% after my first year.

I’m now in a better city, with more opportunites, less stress, and more freedom.

I’m also in a position to rebuild my personal training business.

The moral of this long-ass post? Get motivated to not hate what you do, and bust your ass to find something you can stand.

And while someone’s giving you money to do a task, don’t half-ass it. It’s a pathetic waste of time.

This thread seems to apply to me. I graduated from a top 10 (not to mention expensive) business school in 2005. I worked as a financial analyst at a major bank making bank. I hated it. I was eventually fired.

My next job was in sales and I hated that as well. I left after a year, and now am at the point where I realize that maybe I’m just not cut out for cubicle life.

I’ve taken the Meyers Briggs Type Indicator and it yielded an INFP. The careers that best suit an “INFP” are teacher/counselor/psychologist.

I do feel naturally inclined towards those professions and most probably would want to be a professor or at least a lecturer.

The conflict I am having is whether to just leave my entire business education behind and get some sort of MA? Or to continue on with business hoping that I make some respectable cheddar somewhere down the line.

I’m kind of leaning towards what suits my personality best, and truly believe that will make me the most successful. But again, I am 24 years old, and by and large, have no idea what I’m talking about. Would I enjoy a professor’s salary with a wife and kids? Will I ever make it to professor? Will I get tenure? Do I love literature/psych enough to write published works? I’m not sure.

Any advice would help immensely. Thanks.