T Nation

Starting Strength?

I’ve heard from many people that there is no point of jumping into bodybuilding splits if you aren’t even strong enough yet, I had Mark Rippetoe starting strength program recommended to me is it the right way to go?

Depends on you goals.

There isn’t any one way to start training as stated above it just depends on your goals mate.

I just read starting strength. The book ins’t so much about what to do when you workout (as the programming aspect is at the very end and its not very long). It’s more about how to perform all the lifts correctly and every other detail about your body when you’re doing them. So it’s really good for those who don’t have a lot of barbell training experience as they should read it to not only learn to lift correctly but understand the underlying principles of barbell training and anatomy. I highly recommend it.

[quote]johnny123 wrote:
there is no point of jumping into bodybuilding splits if you aren’t even strong enough yet[/quote]
That’s like saying “There’s no point in putting on my socks because my shoes aren’t on yet.” One almost always goes with the other.

Especially at your stage of experience, or rather inexperience, there’s likely going to be a lot of carryover either way.

Since your goals have changed from “bulking” to “cutting” in the last 8 weeks (which I disagree with, but whatever), I’d say no, Starting Strength is not appropriate for you.

mmm I’m just so confused about what and what I shouldn’t be doing

You know what you should do? Pick a program, do this program consistently for a year, stay off of the internet for that same time period. Seriously, you’re going to analyze this to death and receive nothing but conflicting advice. Just do something, anything, and don’t ask for any opinions. Keep a log to track your progress and make adjustments as necessary.

james

Johnny… Try 5 3 1 AS WRITTEN.
I love it’s structure. I know exactly what I’m going to do each workout. If it’s a “good day” I’ll hit extra reps on the last set. I like the progress that’s built in for each week. 531 has really improved my attitude in the gym. It’s not hit or miss workouts. You can see the improvement.
Jim Wendler has several articles on 531 here as do the forums. Do yourself a favor and read them. Then stick with the program. You’ll be successful.

[quote]johnny123 wrote:
mmm I’m just so confused about what and what I shouldn’t be doing[/quote]
Then simplify, simplify, simplify.

It’s pretty normal for a young dude to get overwhelmed by the options on the Internet. So, take a breath and focus on doing the basics consistently and laying a solid foundation.

For training, choose any one of the plans below. Any one. It… does… not… matter… which. But you’ll pick one and stick with it for four months. You won’t be “bulking” or “cutting”. Your goal is going to be “lifting weights 3-5 days per week for 16 weeks without interruption.”





For nutrition, again, you’re not going to be “bulking” or “cutting”. You’re just going to be “eating well for the next 16 weeks.” Don’t stress about your bodyweight too much, trying to make sure it goes up or goes down. As long as you’re getting stronger each week in the gym and you’re getting closer to “liking” what you see in the mirror, you’re on the right track.

These nutrition articles have some very good, but basic, guidelines. Simply focusing on eating well a few times a day, and eating “clean” more often than not, but not trying to eat like a pre-contest bodybuilder.


http://www.T-Nation.com/strength-training-topics/1464

(^ great list of what foods to focus on.)

If you can cook a bit for yourself, do it. That’s going to make things even easier.

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]johnny123 wrote:
mmm I’m just so confused about what and what I shouldn’t be doing[/quote]
Then simplify, simplify, simplify.

It’s pretty normal for a young dude to get overwhelmed by the options on the Internet. So, take a breath and focus on doing the basics consistently and laying a solid foundation.

For training, choose any one of the plans below. Any one. It… does… not… matter… which. But you’ll pick one and stick with it for four months. You won’t be “bulking” or “cutting”. Your goal is going to be “lifting weights 3-5 days per week for 16 weeks without interruption.”





For nutrition, again, you’re not going to be “bulking” or “cutting”. You’re just going to be “eating well for the next 16 weeks.” Don’t stress about your bodyweight too much, trying to make sure it goes up or goes down. As long as you’re getting stronger each week in the gym and you’re getting closer to “liking” what you see in the mirror, you’re on the right track.

These nutrition articles have some very good, but basic, guidelines. Simply focusing on eating well a few times a day, and eating “clean” more often than not, but not trying to eat like a pre-contest bodybuilder.


http://www.T-Nation.com/strength-training-topics/1464

(^ great list of what foods to focus on.)

If you can cook a bit for yourself, do it. That’s going to make things even easier.[/quote]

Great post.

-Zep

thanks Chris !

[quote]Zeppelin0731 wrote:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]johnny123 wrote:
mmm I’m just so confused about what and what I shouldn’t be doing[/quote]
Then simplify, simplify, simplify.

It’s pretty normal for a young dude to get overwhelmed by the options on the Internet. So, take a breath and focus on doing the basics consistently and laying a solid foundation.

For training, choose any one of the plans below. Any one. It… does… not… matter… which. But you’ll pick one and stick with it for four months. You won’t be “bulking” or “cutting”. Your goal is going to be “lifting weights 3-5 days per week for 16 weeks without interruption.”





For nutrition, again, you’re not going to be “bulking” or “cutting”. You’re just going to be “eating well for the next 16 weeks.” Don’t stress about your bodyweight too much, trying to make sure it goes up or goes down. As long as you’re getting stronger each week in the gym and you’re getting closer to “liking” what you see in the mirror, you’re on the right track.

These nutrition articles have some very good, but basic, guidelines. Simply focusing on eating well a few times a day, and eating “clean” more often than not, but not trying to eat like a pre-contest bodybuilder.


http://www.T-Nation.com/strength-training-topics/1464

(^ great list of what foods to focus on.)

If you can cook a bit for yourself, do it. That’s going to make things even easier.[/quote]

Great post.

-Zep[/quote]

x100

Colucci does it again…many thanks :slight_smile:

Things I have learned from reading SS, and doing a similarly designed program:

  1. My form dramatically improved.
  2. I am better at making it to the gym regardless of the circumstances. (I was making excuses because I didn’t have anyone to go with)
  3. You learn how to recover after you realize that squatting 3x a week and under eating/sleeping suck balls.
  4. You learn that squat/bench/deadlift/press/chins are great exercises and the only people that shouldn’t be doing them are people with injuries or who do not understand/possess good form.
  5. You learn about making progress (adding weight every workout for new PR’s), and you get tougher when you get used to going into the gym 3x a week and expecting to do more weight than you did last time.
  6. You will learn how stupid “Men’s Health” type workouts are. (Think about it, none of the biggest guys in the gym use medicine ball pushups as their primary chest/triceps builder.)

There are a lot more, but those are the big ones.

I transitioned smoothly into 5/3/1 BBB after this after a few weeks of thinking and just kinda free-styling it.

It took me a long time to put all of that together by myself just reading the book and making an honest effort.

The cons of the program are as follows:

  1. You may be led to believe that you will make gains that you simply will not.
  2. If you don’t have an eye for detail, or you are easily distracted from a program, you will ruin the program.
  3. You will learn about tendonitis/joint pain. If you’re not intelligent about it, you will get hurt or worse, discouraged and quit. (I almost did this a couple times. Luckily I kept working.)
  4. It is not a bodybuilding program. It never will be. Not by any stretch of the imagination. It will neglect certain body parts.
  5. It will be difficult to figure out without any help. Not impossible, but difficult. (I read this thing like a Bible and scrutinized every word and how it applied to my workouts/form. Also, I did this over a summer vacation from college. I dont think I would have been able to do it if it was during a busier time in my life.)

Here is the clincher though. I learned things that would have taken me a lot longer to learn in a very short period of time (I’m still no form expert, but you understand what I mean). That being said, there are a lot more efficient ways of going about doing things than using this program. If you want, I recommend reading the book and trying to absorb what you can and apply it, but if you are at all familiar with proper weight lifting form, just skip the SS program and do one of the good ones that Mr. Colucci posted above.

I would say that you should not worry about building imbalances so much. This does not mean that it is ok to not train a body part (you should train them all), but it does mean that you dont have to worry so much about your upper chest/rear delt development until you actually have a chest and some nice shoulders (I performed a lot of assistance work, and eventually modified the rep scheme).

My best advice would be to find someone who is knowledgeable and try to lift with them (someone who doesn’t fall into broscience), or ask questions to someone who wont feed you a bunch of bullshit and actually knows what they are talking about.

Lifting is about consistency. Keep trying, keep progressing, keep learning. You can always learn. It’s the oddest thing ever, but after I decided to be patient with the weights, listen to the right people, and give things an honest chance, Ive started making the best progress I’ve ever made. And all of my buddies who said I was full of shit and not going to progress? They’re all still the same weight, and lifting the same numbers.

You will learn, be patient, eat more good foods, sleep more quality hours, lift consistently and intelligently with good form striving to make progress (better form/more reps/more weight).

My one buddy, who would always make jokes about me, mocking me saying “tryina get HYOOOOOGE brah hahaha!”, didn’t see me for a few months this year. He was in disbelief when he saw me. You would think that he shit a brick after I told him I haven’t touched any type of powder or supplement since I started training again. Don’t use supplements until you have gotten the basics of eating and sleeping right. Too many people try to make them their main source of nutrients or whatever and then when it doesn’t work they claim they were lied to by supplement companies.

-Zep

When I first started I was doing a 5 day split, it worked well for me but because I didn’t have a solid foundation for compound lifts my other lifts suffered. Now I have switched to 5x5, and am bored out of my mind every night at the gym, but I keep telling myself a few more months and I’ll switch back to a split, just want to perfect my form a bit more and up my strength. I recommend you start with 5x5, I wish I had.