T Nation

Starting a New Training Cycle! HELP


#1

Stats: 6'1, 190lbs, Sq: 255, Be: 225, De: 405.

Just recently switched from bodybuilding to powerlifting, starting a new Westside Barbell cycle. From what I've read it says to go for 8 weeks then adjust the program according to strengths and weaknesses. I have trouble in the hole for squats, which explains why I have problems off the floor when I pull, I ALSO have problems off the chest for my bench. I've tried to adjust the program to help my weaknesses, however, the powerlifting community is quite split in terms of what works and what doesn't and it pretty much always boils down to "figuring out your body" which I'm trying to do.

I generally train monday through friday because I'm currently away at school and use the school gym in between classes. I have access to bumper plates, lifting platforms, power racks etc. pretty much anything you'd need. I'm hoping you guys could provide some advice as to exercises or tempo changes I can use to help my weaknesses. I'll post my split down below.

Thanks!


#2

Low Bar Squat - 10 sets - 3 sets of 2 at 90%+
Speed Pulls - 10 sets - 2 reps at 50%
Romanian DL - 2 sets of 20 reps
Lying Leg Curl - 3 sets of 8 reps
Leg Raises - 5 sets to failure
Pendlay Row - 5 sets of 3 reps

Bench - 10 sets - 3 sets of 2 at 90%+
Incline Close Grip Bench - 4 sets of 4 reps
Floor Extensions - 4 sets of 8 reps
Pullup - 5 sets to failure
Unilateral Row - 3 sets of 8 reps
Shoulder Press - 4 sets of 6 reps

Low Bar Speed Squat - 10 sets of 2 reps at 50%
Conventional Deadlift - 8 sets - 2 doubles at 90%
Romanian Deadlift - 3 sets of 6 reps
Lying Leg Curl - 3 sets of 8 reps
Pendlay Row - 5 sets of 5 reps
Cable Crunch - 5 sets to failure

Bench - 10 sets of 2 reps at 50%
Close Grip Bench - 4 sets of 5 reps
Floor Extensions - 4 sets of 8 repsChin up - 5 sets to failure
Pendlay Row - 6 sets of 3 reps
Hammer Curl - 3 sets 12 reps

High Bar Squat - 5 sets of 5 reps
Snatch Grip Deadlift - 6 sets of 3 reps
Leg Extension - 5 sets of 12 reps
Straight Leg Deadlift - 3 sets of 8 reps
Rear Delt Fly - 4 sets of 12 reps
Pullups - 3 sets to failure


#3

If those are your numbers then the best thing you can do right now as far programming is concerned is go back to basics IMO


#4

Just hit the main three. Train as heavy as possible while still recovering well. Get your body weight up. Singles, doubles and triples work well. Focus on the main lifts and their proper execution. Accessory work as needed but not mandatory. If accessories hinder your recovery, do less accessory work. Don’t be afraid to experiment. Everyone grows differently. There is no one way to get stronger (although there are proven methods; not programs).

Powerlifting is all about a single rep if you plan to compete so make sure to train how you play.

How you get there is up to your body’s ability to recover.

Good luck.

FYI - WSBB method is about ME DE and RE methods. How you choose to incorporate them is up to you. They are not set in stone. You make them work for you. If they don’t work, drop them.


#5

I’d go back to the drawing board with your program.

Always use the simplest tool to do the job.

Methods diminish in effectiveness the more often you use them. At your level, very simple methods will do a good job. Once you get strong, it will take more volume, more planning, and more time.

If you use a complex system now, you’ll have already fired that bullet. It may get you stronger but when you hit a wall what then? More volume, more complexity?

I’d follow a basic, canned training system and work your ass off for a long time. By the time things slow down and you actually need more programming complexity, you’ll have learned enough to come with something a lot better than what you have now.

Good luck.


#6

At your level, you should not be doing something like this. Do a simple program that focuses on the big three lifts. A close second to getting stronger on the main lifts should be gaining weight. Look to gain at least 30 lbs. or more over the next year or something similar to that, as at 6"1’ if you want to be really strong, you should be looking to weigh 250-275 lbs. in order to maximize your lifts. Sheikos Beginner programs are perfect


#7

Thanks for the advice everyone! I think I got a bit off the handle with the whole programming aspect as many of you pointed out. I’m going to start the Sheiko template next week and hopefully see some strength gains.


#8

Aside from programming, to make the best gains possible you’ll have to nail down your technique. Record yourself and constantly evaluate what you’re doing wrong while being honest with yourself. Search for training advice from top lifters through articles, youtube, etc. and keep learning. Don’t just follow a few people, follow as many as you can to increase your breadth of knowledge so that you can really figure out what works best for you.