T Nation

Started Lifting and Dieting. Advice?


#1

I recently started lifting 2 months ago and about a month ago started dieting. I have lost 10lbs in the past month but my main concern is if I'm doing it right? My goal is to get ripped and gain muscle but from hours of research it seems doing both at the same time is very hard. I am 6'3" and 190lbs. I would consider myself an endomorph. Currently I am restricting myself to 2100 calories and hit the gym 4 times a week. I also play basketball a minimum of 3 times a week for about an hour. With this plan will I be able to retain my current muscle mass and get lean? I only supplement with ON whey protein. And my macros are set at 40% carb, 25% fat and 35% protein.

Any help / suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


Where Do I Start? (With Pics)
#2

You are not a endomorph structurally looking at your picture,


#3

Well, you're half right and half wrong. You're not particularly fat, so you'd probably do better working on gaining muscle - just make sure you're eating lots of good food (ie no processed crap). You'll need to up your calories too. Generally, I understand that your maintenance window is bodyweight in lbs x 14 to bodyweight in lbs x 17.

So, for you that would be 190x14 to 190x17, or 2660-3230. That's just maintenance. I think, based on what I've done for myself, you'd do fine setting your calories at 3300 and training as you have been. That should keep your growth going, but minimise fat gain (there will be a little, but that's not a problem).

Make sure you're training smart and consistently and you'll be fine (four days a week with your basketball sounds good). You don't have to squat, bench and deadlift but you'll probably benefit from doing a fair bit of variations of those lifts and supplementing them with more isolation kind of work if you want. Do plenty of row variations too.


#4

I just thought since I was skinny?... idk I am new too all this. Any suggestions on my current plan?


#5

ok you meant ectomorph ... I feel @MarkKO has good advice.


#6

yeah 2100 cals for a 6'3 guy is waay too low


#7

I think your macros are OK, but you could probably up the protein a little at the expense of fats. You'll need carbs to add muscle.

For training, your basketball should take care of any cardio. For your gym time, you could do a lot worse than something like Greyskull LP or (I'm biased) a 531 variation. Something like 531 with FSL multiple sets and Triumvirate assistance is simple to set up and should work well to add some muscle as long as you're eating enough. You could also check out some of Paul Carter's stuff, but I'm not familiar enough to say much beyond he knows his shit.


#8

Add 20 lbs. seriously.

I'm 6'3" and 210 and considered small.

At 50 years old, I would die eating 2100 calories a day. I mean, melt.

You need to change your mentality on how you look, unless you want to be a soccer player. Get on a good program. Add calories. Be consistent. See you in 6 months for progress report.

Good luck.


#9

MarkKO has good advice.

You can't flex bone.

In order to look buff you're going to need to reach 220+ at 6'3". So, get to work.

Don't eat shit and junk, and don't jack your calories up huge steps at any point, and you won't get too fat if you are working hard in the gym. I mean really hard.

As a general rule of thumb, once your diet has reached the highest maintenance level of calories you are capable of (you can in fact maintain weight in a narrow range of calorie levels due to metabolic inefficiency), increase by about 300 calories any time you adjust. This will keep you leaner as you grow instead of jacking things up 1000 calories over maintenance.

Don't get fixated on a calorie number--if you're not growing at 3500 calories, then its NOT ENOUGH...no matter how much you wish it was. Calorie intake is enough to grow when the scale moves (It doesn't need to move much, 1/2 a lb a week is technically growing).

This also means it is necessary to track youe calories. The only way to KNOW you're eating enough--not "think" not "feel" but KNOW it--is to keep track of them. Kinda like your car...you may not change the oil at 3000 miles but you at least know it is time because you look at the odometer. Without tracking you're in the dark.

Adjust, wait til your weight stops moving for 7 days completely to adjust again. Get the most out of the least.

And train your back and legs for the love of all that is good.


#10

This is really well put. Counting calories is a tool to allow control. The only magic number of calories is the one that works - which means it can change over time. Generally though, you'd be surprised how much you need to eat to grow. It's more than you think, and I'm saying this as a guy who naturally eats a bunch if allowed to who found it out.