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Squats/Deadlift Help

Hello all. I have started seriously working out but have not yet started doing squats, basically because I just dont know how to do them and dont know how much weight to use. So…

  1. How much weight should I start with? I can bench around 120-130 and am 19 years old and weight like 145. I dont know if this helps but I really dont know how much weight is a good starting weight.

  2. What exactly do Squats and Deadlifts work on your body? I hear Squats work your back which would be good because I need back help and I have no idea what deadlifts do.

Right now I basically do Military Press, Bicep Curl, sit-ups and Bench Press. Bad? What do I need to add?

Thanks so much!

David

  1. Start with only the bar on your squats. Add weight slowly. Focus on form; get someone to teach you.

  2. Here’s a website. Use it. www.exrx.net/Lists/Directory.html

  3. Exercises for your back! Pull ups & rows. I personally love working my back more than anything.

[quote]Dyepaintball12 wrote:
Hello all. I have started seriously working out but have not yet started doing squats, basically because I just dont know how to do them and dont know how much weight to use. So…

  1. How much weight should I start with? I can bench around 120-130 and am 19 years old and weight like 145. I dont know if this helps but I really dont know how much weight is a good starting weight.[/quote]

No that dont mean nuttin. start at the bar move up from there

[quote]
2) What exactly do Squats and Deadlifts work on your body? I hear Squats work your back which would be good because I need back help and I have no idea what deadlifts do. [/quote]

Everything No really

Squats dependent on form will hit the whole;e legs, ass, hips in varied degrees dependent on which style, as well as abs, low back, upper back even shoulders and arms

DL same way More in the low back, hams, glutes upper back the squat but still the hit it all

[quote]
Right now I basically do Military Press, Bicep Curl, sit-ups and Bench Press. Bad? What do I need to add?[/quote]

Rows, chins, and legs the other 3/4’s of your body your only working about a 1/4 of it

Id pick a solid program from the are you a beginner thread get some real time and learning under the iron in a complete program. read that and the links and come back with ?'s

Phill

[quote]Dyepaintball12 wrote:
Hello all. I have started seriously working out but have not yet started doing squats, basically because I just dont know how to do them and dont know how much weight to use. So…

  1. How much weight should I start with? I can bench around 120-130 and am 19 years old and weight like 145. I dont know if this helps but I really dont know how much weight is a good starting weight.

  2. What exactly do Squats and Deadlifts work on your body? I hear Squats work your back which would be good because I need back help and I have no idea what deadlifts do.

Right now I basically do Military Press, Bicep Curl, sit-ups and Bench Press. Bad? What do I need to add?

Thanks so much!

David [/quote]

Wow, you’re almost just like me. I don’t know what your goals are though, but when I started, I could only do 45 pounds for my bench (at 124 pounds), and now it’s up to 180 (at 145 pounds). I’m also 19, BTW.

  1. Start with the basic 3x10 like I did. Do a wieght you can do for 10 reps but not 11 (your 10 RM). Once you plateau, try pyramids. If you plataeu again, try more advanced techniques like supersets and 5x5. Remember, stick to your training as long as it works. There’s no use fixing what doesn’t need fixing. But if you plateau, don’t waste your time and switch to another program.

  2. Deadlifts work your back more than Squats do, but they’re both essential nonetheless. They are after all the best testosterone and growth hormone exercises. Your basic program lacks other back exercises like pullups and barbell rows. If you’re gonna work your biceps, work your triceps as well and do overhead extensions or cable pushdowns. Pressing movements don’t develop triceps that much.

Go buy the book Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. You are going to need alot of help and would be much better off getting that book than asking anyone on here advice, especially if you want to learn those lifts.

While you are reading the book you should be practicing squatting with just the bar. And you will definitely need to stretch your glutes, hip flexors and hamstrings, at least I am assuming, most people do.

[quote]Shadowzz4 wrote:
Go buy the book Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. You are going to need alot of help and would be much better off getting that book than asking anyone on here advice, especially if you want to learn those lifts.

While you are reading the book you should be practicing squatting with just the bar. And you will definitely need to stretch your glutes, hip flexors and hamstrings, at least I am assuming, most people do.[/quote]

Coudln’t agree more. I bought this book a few months ago and it is great. Definitely work on Squats, Deadlifts, Bench and The Press to get a good, solid foundation first.

absolutely. i use that book to teach Middle School kids to lift. it works.

sb

[quote]Astute wrote:
Shadowzz4 wrote:
Go buy the book Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. You are going to need alot of help and would be much better off getting that book than asking anyone on here advice, especially if you want to learn those lifts.

While you are reading the book you should be practicing squatting with just the bar. And you will definitely need to stretch your glutes, hip flexors and hamstrings, at least I am assuming, most people do.

Coudln’t agree more. I bought this book a few months ago and it is great. Definitely work on Squats, Deadlifts, Bench and The Press to get a good, solid foundation first.
[/quote]

[quote]mopar_nocar wrote:
absolutely. i use that book to teach Middle School kids to lift. it works.

sb

Astute wrote:
Shadowzz4 wrote:
Go buy the book Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. You are going to need alot of help and would be much better off getting that book than asking anyone on here advice, especially if you want to learn those lifts.

While you are reading the book you should be practicing squatting with just the bar. And you will definitely need to stretch your glutes, hip flexors and hamstrings, at least I am assuming, most people do.

Coudln’t agree more. I bought this book a few months ago and it is great. Definitely work on Squats, Deadlifts, Bench and The Press to get a good, solid foundation first.

[/quote]

Allow me to fourth that. Phenomenal introduction to the basis lifts.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:

Wow, you’re almost just like me. I don’t know what your goals are though, but when I started, I could only do 45 pounds for my bench (at 124 pounds), and now it’s up to 180 (at 145 pounds). I’m also 19, BTW.

  1. Start with the basic 3x10 like I did. Do a wieght you can do for 10 reps but not 11 (your 10 RM). Once you plateau, try pyramids. If you plataeu again, try more advanced techniques like supersets and 5x5. Remember, stick to your training as long as it works. There’s no use fixing what doesn’t need fixing. But if you plateau, don’t waste your time and switch to another program.

  2. Deadlifts work your back more than Squats do, but they’re both essential nonetheless. They are after all the best testosterone and growth hormone exercises. Your basic program lacks other back exercises like pullups and barbell rows. If you’re gonna work your biceps, work your triceps as well and do overhead extensions or cable pushdowns. Pressing movements don’t develop triceps that much.[/quote]

undead: I consider it rather indecent for you to offer advice to anyone at your level. 300bp, 400sq, 500dl is a good general bench mark for when someone is qualified to talk like an expert. (Of course, there are exceptions, but you are not one.) It sounds like you have a few years to go to get there.

Regurgitating info that you’ve read doesn’t really help anyone. It’s more helpful to just direct him to your source, who will no doubt say it better than you.

Recounting your experience will be helpful once you actually have some experience getting strong. Pretty much any method in existence will get someone to your level. Many are a lot stronger than you are before they ever touch a weight.

OP: Certainly do not listen to this advice. You need to get under the bar and do the lifts. There are many ways to set up your training week, but if it were up to me, I’d have you do something like:

Monday

SQ 3x5
BP 3x5
Row 3x5
Assistance Work

Wednesday

DL 3x5
Military 3x5
Pullup 3x5
Assistance Work

Friday

Repeat Monday

Monday

Repeat Wednesday, etc…

As far as weight, start with the bar, nail perfect technique and take your time…

Again, there are many ways to set up a program; this template I believe Mark Rippetoe uses with his athletes (or something similar) and this type of training works extremely well for many people.

As far as technique on the squat and deadlift, go to Joe Skopec’s powerlifting site for video demonstrations, read all the articles about lifting technique you can by Dave Tate, Jim Wendler, Rick Crain, and other high-level powerlifters. Some of the info may conflict, but you have to experiment and find the technique that works for you.

What do squats and deadlifts work? Lots of muscles…don’t worry about it. Just do them and you will get big and strong. Worry about weakpoints, bringing up bodyparts later, once you get up to around the 300,400,500 level.

Good luck.

[quote]Shadowzz4 wrote:
Go buy the book Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. You are going to need alot of help and would be much better off getting that book than asking anyone on here advice, especially if you want to learn those lifts.

While you are reading the book you should be practicing squatting with just the bar. And you will definitely need to stretch your glutes, hip flexors and hamstrings, at least I am assuming, most people do.[/quote]

Didn’t read this before I posted. You should definitely get Mark’s book and do what it says.

Best.

[quote]Ramo wrote:
300bp, 400sq, 500dl is a good general bench mark for when someone is qualified to talk like an expert. (Of course, there are exceptions, but you are not one.) It sounds like you have a few years to go to get there. [/quote]

Bullshit. A number doesn’t make you an expert or novice. Experience is the only factor. So a guy that can do 295 for a bench isn’t qualified to give advice? How about a 365 squat? 405 DL? Que?

[quote]OP: Certainly do not listen to this advice. You need to get under the bar and do the lifts. There are many ways to set up your training week, but if it were up to me, I’d have you do something like:

Monday

SQ 3x5
BP 3x5
Row 3x5
Assistance Work

Wednesday

DL 3x5
Military 3x5
Pullup 3x5
Assistance Work

Friday

Repeat Monday

Monday

Repeat Wednesday, etc…

As far as weight, start with the bar, nail perfect technique and take your time…

Again, there are many ways to set up a program; this template I believe Mark Rippetoe uses with his athletes (or something similar) and this type of training works extremely well for many people.

As far as technique on the squat and deadlift, go to Joe Skopec’s powerlifting site for video demonstrations, read all the articles about lifting technique you can by Dave Tate, Jim Wendler, Rick Crain, and other high-level powerlifters. Some of the info may conflict, but you have to experiment and find the technique that works for you.

What do squats and deadlifts work? Lots of muscles…don’t worry about it. Just do them and you will get big and strong. Worry about weakpoints, bringing up bodyparts later, once you get up to around the 300,400,500 level.

Good luck.[/quote]

3x5? Where’s the speed work? You know, ME and DE days? That’s a crap routine, if I ever saw one.

You want to learn how to lift for strength, mass and / or athleticism? Read CT’s Training Strategy Handbook:

http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1474118

He’s an actual trainer that knows his stuff. Unlike Ramo.

[quote]kroby wrote:
Ramo wrote:
300bp, 400sq, 500dl is a good general bench mark for when someone is qualified to talk like an expert. (Of course, there are exceptions, but you are not one.) It sounds like you have a few years to go to get there.

Bullshit. A number doesn’t make you an expert or novice. Experience is the only factor. So a guy that can do 295 for a bench isn’t qualified to give advice? How about a 365 squat? 405 DL? Que?

OP: Certainly do not listen to this advice. You need to get under the bar and do the lifts. There are many ways to set up your training week, but if it were up to me, Id have you do something like:

Monday

SQ 3x5
BP 3x5
Row 3x5
Assistance Work

Wednesday

DL 3x5
Military 3x5
Pullup 3x5
Assistance Work

Friday

Repeat Monday

Monday

Repeat Wednesday, etc…

As far as weight, start with the bar, nail perfect technique and take your time…

Again, there are many ways to set up a program; this template I believe Mark Rippetoe uses with his athletes (or something similar) and this type of training works extremely well for many people.

As far as technique on the squat and deadlift, go to Joe Skopec’s powerlifting site for video demonstrations, read all the articles about lifting technique you can by Dave Tate, Jim Wendler, Rick Crain, and other high-level powerlifters. Some of the info may conflict, but you have to experiment and find the technique that works for you.

What do squats and deadlifts work? Lots of muscles…don’t worry about it. Just do them and you will get big and strong. Worry about weakpoints, bringing up bodyparts later, once you get up to around the 300,400,500 level.

Good luck.

3x5? Where’s the speed work? You know, ME and DE days? That’s a crap routine, if I ever saw one.

You want to learn how to lift for strength, mass and / or athleticism? Read CT’s Training Strategy Handbook:

http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1474118

He’s an actual trainer that knows his stuff. Unlike Ramo.
[/quote]

Thanks for your response to my post. I will try to address your points.

Where is the DE work? Are you serious? The dude just started lifting weights and probably cant bench 200 lbs. This doesnt merit an argument.

ME work is a great idea too. Im sure it will be hugely productive, especially before he has built any muscle mass or developed any technical ability with the lifts. Brilliant.

As for the tenability of a strength program without ME or DE work, read up on:

-Bill Starr
-Glenn Pendlay
-Boris Sheiko
-Albert Fomin
-Sergei Ivanov
-Stephan Korte
-Pretty much any European IPF lifter

Most European IPF guys train predominantly on the main lifts with high frequency for low/moderate reps. (So does Wade Hooper ? imagine how much stronger he would be with your guidance!)

Regarding the template I put up, it is pretty close to (if not exactly the same as) what Rippetoe does with his guys. Are you familiar with him and the results he gets? Im sure you would do better, but still, his work is pretty impressive considering uses such a crap routine.

As for the 300, 400, 500 thing: To be honest, those numbers are just a baseline. They do not mean you are strong by any means, they just show that at least you have done some training and gotten SOME results. I would not take the advice of someone with a max squat of 365 (which you listed) unless they weighed 100 pounds or did it on two prosthetic legs. The other numbers you listed were equally unimpressive. I am not trying to be a hardass about this, but there is strong, and there is mediocre. I am mediocre, and Im a lot stronger than those numbers. Would you take advice about getting strong from somebody who pulled 405? You need a reality check about what strength really is.

As for me personally, it is true what you say: I am not a trainer. Just a lifter. But I will total over 1500 raw this year at 220 (not impressive to me but Ive worked hard and am getting better each year.) If you are stronger than me, then congratulations.

Hell, if youve accomplished anything as a lifter, then congratulations. Im curious, if you dont mind sharing, as to how strong you are, since you scoffed at Rips template so arrogantly.

Regards.