T Nation

Squat Question

Hi.

I’ve been squatting for a few months and something weird happens.

First, I want to let you know that I’m not doing half reps, I’m going all the way down, the butt just over the floor.

But when I’m standing up, as the weigh gets heavy, I slow down at some point.

Right at the beginning, it’s going well, but when my knees get at parallel or close to it, I start slowing down and almost stalling, and when that point is passed, I can finish the rep easily.

It’s strange, it’s like that I lose strength in the middle of the rep, stall, then go back up.

I know that the leg is made of many different muscle. Maybe the one needed to just get over parallel is weaker than the others, wich make it harder for me to stand up at this point.

I don’t know, is this normal? Is it a form issue?

Thanks.

PS: Sorry for my english, I may make some mistakes.

There was a thread about this a few weeks ago. Just keep squatting, its normal.

Ok, thanks.

Edit: while you’re at it, could you post that thread? I’d like to take a look.

Very normal.

Here ya go:

(I obviousley didnt kno the answer until this this thread)

One more thing.

If it is normal, is it something that will stop in the future, is it a beginner thing?

I believe it has to do with the way your limbs are built and leverage. All i know is that it has to do with 90 degree angles between bones.

[quote]Annihilator wrote:
One more thing.

If it is normal, is it something that will stop in the future, is it a beginner thing?[/quote]

Not really. What you’re experiencing is a “sticking point”. It is the point at which you are the weakest, and most likely to fail a lift. Sticking points can change with your training experience, strength levels, and most often as you concentrate on certain muscle groups. In other words, as you concentrate on strengthening the weakest muscle group in your lift, your sticking point will move.

Example–your lockout sucks in the bench press. You can get it 3/4 the way up, but can’t finish it. Your triceps are weak. You work on them and after about 6 weeks you start failing in the middle of the bench instead of at the top–this means your triceps are no longer the weakest link in the bench.

Same happens with squatting. 90 degrees is when the leverages are most unfavorable to you supporting the weight, so it’s not surprising you’d be slowest there at all. I would work on your hamstring and glute strength. You need them for getting out of the hole, and you also need them for breaking past 90 degrees.

Ok I see.

I suppose that by working the squat, i’ll fix those, right?

I’m actually doing starting strength by rippetoe, so I wouldn’t want to start adding exercises to the original program.

Yes, focus on speed. As fast as you can go with perfect form.

ripps’ hip drive education helped me a lot http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yha2XAc2qu8

I’ve already seen that. I don’t fully understand what he means though. The part about the knees going forward, taking tension off the hamstrings made me confused.

[quote]Annihilator wrote:
Hi.

I’ve been squatting for a few months and something weird happens.

First, I want to let you know that I’m not doing half reps, I’m going all the way down, the butt just over the floor.

But when I’m standing up, as the weigh gets heavy, I slow down at some point.

Right at the beginning, it’s going well, but when my knees get at parallel or close to it, I start slowing down and almost stalling, and when that point is passed, I can finish the rep easily.

It’s strange, it’s like that I lose strength in the middle of the rep, stall, then go back up.

I know that the leg is made of many different muscle. Maybe the one needed to just get over parallel is weaker than the others, wich make it harder for me to stand up at this point.

I don’t know, is this normal? Is it a form issue?

Thanks.

PS: Sorry for my english, I may make some mistakes.[/quote]

Try to incoporate chains or bands.

I thought it was all about form. Is this how you are supposed to squat all the time?

[quote]chicktuna wrote:
I thought it was all about form. Is this how you are supposed to squat all the time?[/quote]

What are you referring to when you say “this” ??

[quote]Annihilator wrote:
I’ve already seen that. I don’t fully understand what he means though. The part about the knees going forward, taking tension off the hamstrings made me confused.[/quote]

It’s hard because that’s a small chunk of a full one on one training session, so context gets lost.

Basically if your balance point is forward (not on the back half of the foot), you are putting all the tension on the quads and ignoring the very large contribution to power that hamstrings can make.

As a side note, Rippetoe is NOT, NOT saying to squat with your chest down. He is also NOT saying to not keep your chest up (raised) throughout the whole motion. You SHOULD keep your chest up because it keeps your balance back and your back tighter. What he is addressing is the balance point issue, and along with that the squatter’s inability to fire his hips through and instead relying on quads. He’s just doing it in a different way than most people probably have heard.

Also it’s worth mentioning that this particular squatter has a number of things wrong with his form, AND that Rippetoe is teaching a somewhat different form that many here have learned (“head down” is a coaching cue I would almost never ever use–

Rippetoe’s position is that having the head down enables better hip drive, which is something I have serious reservations about… but that’s beyond the scope of this beginner’s thread).

Additionally, you hear him tell the lifter to not think about lifting the chest, just concentrate on shoving the butt up and forward, and not worry about the angle his back is making. Then later you hear him say that his form is a little exaggerated but that it’s ok for learning this. Rippetoe is having him concentrate on 1 and only 1 thing right now, at the expense of other problems.

So don’t worry about the confusion—just remember forward balance means the quads are doing the work and there’s no stretch in the hamstrings. You can see this if you just do a bodyweight squat.

[quote]Annihilator wrote:
First, I want to let you know that I’m not doing half reps, I’m going all the way down, the butt just over the floor.
[/quote]

First of all, we all know it’s good to go deep, but this sounds excessive if you’re being literal.

In my opinion your butt should not be “just over the floor” when squatting unless you’re an olympic weightlifter.

That’s just the nature of the lift. It’s probably for the same reason that the middle point of a bench press is usually the make or break point for most people.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
Annihilator wrote:
First, I want to let you know that I’m not doing half reps, I’m going all the way down, the butt just over the floor.

First of all, we all know it’s good to go deep, but this sounds excessive if you’re being literal.

In my opinion your butt should not be “just over the floor” when squatting unless you’re an olympic weightlifter.[/quote]

I just wanted to say that I wasn’t the kind of kid that do 315 lbs squats with 2 inches of range of motion and then brag about it to his friends.

I’m past parallel and my knees bend as much as the can, my butt is lower than my knees.

[quote]Aragorn wrote:
chicktuna wrote:
I thought it was all about form. Is this how you are supposed to squat all the time?

What are you referring to when you say “this” ??[/quote]

In the video it the coach wants him to bend to get hip power but I thought that was the opposite of what you are supposed to do.