T Nation

Squat Going Down Hill


#21

And I completely understand that. Like I said. I’m not trying to be an asshole. When I first got on here I didn’t know shit! Now, I understand a tiny bit of shit. It’s only taken a few years.


#22

I don’t understand either of your posts in this current thread. I’m not sure what your implying.

Posting the video makes sense (and I will watch that), but I’m lost as to the other stuff.


#23

I suspect you have retroverted hips (femurs towards the rear of the pelvis). I have the same issue. When you squat your femurs are hitting hitting the pelvis. The solution is to squat with the thighs turned outward until there is no interference. Try the following.

Sit on a below parallel box and spread your thighs open while leaning forward with a flat back. Use the combination of foot width and thigh spread that doesn’t produce pain. Use this as a starting point. By the way reduce poundages to the empty bar to start.


#24

The question is whether you have some sort of adductor issue (as the first post would suggest) or if you have some hip impingement going on. Do your groin muscles hurt when you do things other than squatting?


#25

Yes! Squatting and dead lifting KILLS my groin/adductor area. Both lifts feel like those are the only muscles I use.

I was also surprised to hear about the static stretching being bad. I do that a lot and every workout. I have horrible flexibility everywhere and have to work really hard with it to make any progress, which is very little.


#26

I think you should see a physiotherapist or sports doctor and see what they say. Nobody here is a professional and we can’t see you in person so any advice is of limited use. It sounds to me like you just have very tight adductors, if you do the stuff I mentioned it might help but it will take a while to sort things out and after all, there could be something else going on. Did you always have this issue? Did it gradually become worse?


#27

The last time I was doing squats was 5 years ago when I went through a brief “I wanna workout” phase. Didn’t have this pain.

I haven’t been lately do to work and weather, but I used to mountain bike 2-3 times a week. Ive heard that can cause some issues from being in that position for a while. I’ve also noticed if I sit and lean forward with my forearms on my knees it hurts in that area and starts to go numbish. Almost like a loss of blood flow feeling.

I will definitely see a physical therapist. Like I said earlier, I never even thought of them for some reason and was thinking my chiropractor was my only option.


#28

See a specialist.


#29

@chris_ottawa

So, check this out! Ever since posting this thread I’ve been reading, studying, and tinkering. I took some video with very light weight, and body weight and compared them to Olympic weight lifters photos. What I found was the barbell at the bottom of my squat was IN FRONT of my toes and my torso was waaaay bent over. After trying numerous times with light weight to keep the bar path over the center of my foot without ever being able to I came up with an idea.

I took a sharpie and made a line on my homemade squat platform (picture attached). This line served as a reference to make sure my feet would remain in the center of the bar path. I then I racked the bar from the front of my rack (see, I fixed it!) and walked back to the back of the rack, taking my preferred squat stance making sure my feet were evenly divided by my sharpie line. KEEPING THE BAR IN CONTACT WITH THE SQUAT RACK POSTS, I began to squat. Using the line for my feet, and the rack as a “forced” bar path I found not only was I more up right and looked just like a real squatter from the side, I was pain free and able to go past parallel. I took the weight all the way up to 285 (30 pounds heavier than I’ve ever squated) and enjoyed every second of it. For the first time ever I felt like my quads were putting in the work and not my groin and hip area.

I didn’t have to heavily rely on the rack, but I did make it a point to keep it in contact. Would keeping the weight very light (sub 100) and doing multiple reps like this to build muscle memory be a good plan?


#30

Congratulations, you have invented the Smith machine.

You could do 5x5 starting with something real light, like maybe 95lbs or even an empty bar. You could squat 2-3 times a week and just add 5lbs each time, try to make each rep perfect.


#31

I literally laughed out loud. I never thought about it like that. Any guesses as to why I fall back with this position when there is no squat rack acting as a smith machine?


#32

Terrible technique. But don’t worry, everyone has to start somewhere.


#33

That leaning forward thing is the cause of many groin and low back problems. It’s a classic. Hopefully, that’s all the problem was.

The way I can tell if the weight is not over my midfoot is if I feel the weight shifting onto the ball of foot and toes. It’s also possible for the opposite to happen. That is the weight getting too far back and all the weight is on the heels. I made that problem and got my own injuries from that.

To get the weight over the right spot, I imagine grabbing the ground with my toes and screwing my feet outward.

Also, it just takes lots of practice. Eventually, you’ll find your groove and it’ll become very natural.


#34

I find very few lifts feel natural :cry: