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Squat Form Check - Knees Way Too Far?


#1


Hi,

Absolute beginner know. Are my knees here way too far or is this still acceptable? I am 6'3". Any other issues (I see knees moving, heels lifting up , bar not necessarily over middle of the foot, bad grip with awkward wrist position, not sure about back position).

I added some pictures as well:




#2

Start here:

Then, once you’re sure you’ve got that down, try here:


#3

Nothing wrong with knees, your stance looks pretty good for a beginner. Work on your arms though, keep them under the bar for more upper back tightness. No need to be flaring them so far behind you.


#4

It seems to me you are trying to do a high bar squat with the bar in the low bar position. Your knee is sticking out so far because you are all legs and your stance is not wide enough. Watch what your knees are doing when you fatigue, they collapse in a bit.

Also, minor thing but your feet are not out at the same angle, your right foot is especially weird, this makes the OCD in me twitch.


#5

I think Ben Bruno said that your knees travelling over your toes is not the big issue (when you have long thighs it may be inevitable) but going up on your toes is - which is what you’re doing. for a low bar squat, you’re waaay too much forward. I agree with tsantos on this. My advice would be to use a box (or a few stacked plates) to sit on so you really learn to move back and reach sufficient depth at the same time. Honestly, I think box squats would be great for you at this point.


#6

Widen your stance just a bit, lower bar down on your back a bout a inch or so, break at the hips, push knees out, screw the floor problem solved , problem staying solved.


#7

Looks good. I agree with above post - keep arms underneath the bar (its not really clamping or holding the bar against your back. It should just kinda stick without force.) Your hands then keep it from sliding down. Think of pointing elbows down not back and bar resting between palm. The one thing additional is if you can - ass to grass. Going all the way down if you can.

And if your not doing this already I find taking deep breath and bracing core at the eccentric portion of the movement just keeps everything tight as you breathe out coming up and flex.


#8

This is not good at all. This is one of those squats that looks much better than it is. If you are getting depth like that with your knees coming forward there is one of two things happening. Your an olympic lifter. And a damn good one. OR your body is faking it and doing a deep squat with very little posterior chain involvement.

One way to tell this is that at the top of the squat you can’t even stand up all the way. That’s due to the fact that the quads are doing everything. Also, if you look at the lift, you can plainly see where the forces are flowing and the knee joint is the obvious focal point of this squat. There is very little going on at the hip joint. This needs a complete start over and rehaul. Posterior chain is super weak I’m betting. Do you have a deadlift vid? That would be helpful.


#9

[quote]One reason putting on size is a headache for many of us tall lifters is the fact that the blanket cues that permeate the training industry are taken to heart by many inexperienced and intermediate lifters alike, with little regard for anthropometrical differences. Here are a few:

“Don’t Let the knees pass forward over the toes.”

Sure. Maybe if you had the world’s longest torso and were also about 5’6".

Otherwise, you’re gonna have to break this rule. I personally haven’t found anything wrong with letting the knees track forward over the toes and that seems to agree with tons of research out there.

If you’re a long legged lummox who’s still trying to follow this cue, give it a rest. For a visual reference, below is a video of me goblet squatting. Granted, the front load will encourage more forward knee tracking, but rest assured that similar angles would be necessary for me to achieve a good, full depth in my barbell back squat.[/quote]


#10

[quote]Reed wrote:
Widen your stance just a bit, lower bar down on your back a bout a inch or so, break at the hips, push knees out, screw the floor problem solved , problem staying solved.[/quote]

All of this.


#11

[quote]Massthetics wrote:
Nothing wrong with knees, your stance looks pretty good for a beginner. Work on your arms though, keep them under the bar for more upper back tightness. No need to be flaring them so far behind you.[/quote]

Less of this


#12

[quote]SmearyToast wrote:
Looks good. I agree with above post - keep arms underneath the bar (its not really clamping or holding the bar against your back. It should just kinda stick without force.) [/quote]

I disagree. Pulling the bar in to my back as well as focusing on getting my elbows under is a solid way to keep your upper back tight.

Can you explain that further? Do you mean your hands are supporting the weight of the bar, or making sure it stays on the shelf your upper back has created?

Why?

I’m with you here though


#13

I disagree. Pulling the bar in to my back as well as focusing on getting my elbows under is a solid way to keep your upper back tight. [/quote]

- Either is okay. This is more of personal recommendation based on different methods. I find its not necessary and can put unnecessary stress on the shoulders joint.

Can you explain that further? Do you mean your hands are supporting the weight of the bar, or making sure it stays on the shelf your upper back has created? [/quote]

- supporting the bar

Why? [/quote]

  • Better question why the hell not? - because squatting deep isn’t bad for the knees (thats number one) - in fact it assists them! It puts the knee joint in more stable movement pattern, and the ass you’ve been working on will thankyou because activates more of them gluteus’ as well. =)

#14

[quote]tsantos wrote:
It seems to me you are trying to do a high bar squat with the bar in the low bar position. Your knee is sticking out so far because you are all legs and your stance is not wide enough. Watch what your knees are doing when you fatigue, they collapse in a bit.

Also, minor thing but your feet are not out at the same angle, your right foot is especially weird, this makes the OCD in me twitch.[/quote]

Money right here.

And I’d like to add OP is lacking knee stability, especially on the right.
OP, you are wise to start with the lighter weight. And regarding what massthetics said, your upper back is fine. I would actually recommend new trainees to exaggerate scapular retraction using lower weights. As long as you maintain neutral spine, all is good in the hood, for now.


#15

OP, if you get conflicting advice and some of it comes from Reed, listen to Reed. He has a track record here.


#16

[quote]jjackkrash wrote:
OP, if you get conflicting advice and some of it comes from Reed, listen to Reed. He has a track record here.

I will second this, and add one thing. Listen to your body as well. Feeling good is usually a good sign you are doing okay. Pain apart from normal DOMS, bad sign.

Keep it up!