T Nation

Squat Every Day


#1

https://www.t-nation.com/training/100-day-squat-challenge

So I just read the Brad Dieter article on squatting 100 days straight. He said he did some other lifting and hypertrophy work- implies some aesthetic goals in there, rather than pure strength.

Has anyone got any experience on whether this could make you grow (without gear)? The only times I have really gained substanital muscle mass are when I have added more squatting and more calories, but I have never done this much!


#2

[quote]BenJman wrote:
So I just read the Brad Dieter article on squatting 100 days straight. He said he did some other lifting and hypertrophy work- implies some aesthetic goals in there, rather than pure strength.

Has anyone got any experience on whether this could make you grow (without gear)? The only times I have really gained substanital muscle mass are when I have added more squatting and more calories, but I have never done this much![/quote]

Why not just do this? If you find what works for you, there’s no reason to stop or change anything just because someone comes up with a new program and gives it a catchy name.


#3

I guess my impression was that the write up focussed on strength/technique. Seems like a powerlifting-frequency vibe, it wasn’t really clear to me whether there was a significant weight/muscle gain for the writer. I was just curious if anyone has experience in that regard.


#4

Yes, you can grow plenty on the daily training of a muscle.


#5

[quote]dt79 wrote:

[quote]BenJman wrote:
So I just read the Brad Dieter article on squatting 100 days straight. He said he did some other lifting and hypertrophy work- implies some aesthetic goals in there, rather than pure strength.

Has anyone got any experience on whether this could make you grow (without gear)? The only times I have really gained substanital muscle mass are when I have added more squatting and more calories, but I have never done this much![/quote]

Why not just do this? If you find what works for you, there’s no reason to stop or change anything just because someone comes up with a new program and gives it a catchy name.[/quote]

x2

If you did it and it worked, why did you stop?


#6

I’ll never understand why people think they need to do these extreme programs, I squat 1-2x a week and have for several years and continuously make progress. People that squat everyday and are strong are outliers, everyone else who does it has a mediocre squat at best and is shitty at everything else.


#7

[quote]cparker wrote:
I’ll never understand why people think they need to do these extreme programs, I squat 1-2x a week and have for several years and continuously make progress. People that squat everyday and are strong are outliers, everyone else who does it has a mediocre squat at best and is shitty at everything else.[/quote]

Frequency isn’t the only component of stress in a program. You can squat every day and undertrain, you can squat once a week and over train. If you pay attention to the strong guys that hit these really high frequencies they almost always have some of the LEAST extreme training sessions.

People think that squatting every day means you take your leg day from your once a week split and do that every day, it doesn’t. My squat workout this morning was a grand total of 13 reps including warm ups. That’s extreme while 25 sets of legs on leg day isn’t? I’d say high frequency is actually the more natural non extreme method and people who starting putting a weeks’ worth of training into a session are the extreme ones.


#8

[quote]dt79 wrote:

[quote]BenJman wrote:
So I just read the Brad Dieter article on squatting 100 days straight. He said he did some other lifting and hypertrophy work- implies some aesthetic goals in there, rather than pure strength.

Has anyone got any experience on whether this could make you grow (without gear)? The only times I have really gained substanital muscle mass are when I have added more squatting and more calories, but I have never done this much![/quote]

Why not just do this? If you find what works for you, there’s no reason to stop or change anything just because someone comes up with a new program and gives it a catchy name.[/quote]
This.

If you want to put on mass and you know how to put on mass, I don’t see what you’re looking to gain from internet strangers.


#9

Similar but better…


#10

[quote]cparker wrote:
I’ll never understand why people think they need to do these extreme programs, I squat 1-2x a week and have for several years and continuously make progress. People that squat everyday and are strong are outliers, everyone else who does it has a mediocre squat at best and is shitty at everything else.[/quote]

I agree, and to be honest was not a fan of this article. I’m curious what the author’s bodyweight and squat was before he did the program… my guess is he was relatively weak on the lift, if he could squat close to his 1RM every day for 100 days straight and actually make progress. It seems like a great way to load up stress on the CNS, without any clear benefit. Didn’t CT write an article just a few weeks ago about how heavy singles are dead?

Also… one guy tries something extreme and has good results, therefore it’s worthy of a T-Nation article recommending it to all readers? Huh…


#11

This inspired me to do something similar for military press because I want to bring that up. I’m using a conservative estimate of 135 for my 1rm and I’ll adjust as I set PRs. The first session this morning went just fine considering I was still beat up from judo last night.

While a lot of people are right to say this type of training is unnecessary in general, the fact is high frequency works for some people and high volume/low frequency works better for others. And while the author may have had a weak squat, I don’t see any issue with really strengthening a weak link by following an “extreme” program for 100 days. The nice thing about a program like this is after the first week, you already know whether or not you can auto regulate it, I mean if you are really in no shape to push yourself on a given day 3 weeks in hitting the minimums should still be doable.

I did a modification to CT’s 20 min muscle builder for 2 months and it was definitely harder on paper and in practice


#12

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:

[quote]cparker wrote:
I’ll never understand why people think they need to do these extreme programs, I squat 1-2x a week and have for several years and continuously make progress. People that squat everyday and are strong are outliers, everyone else who does it has a mediocre squat at best and is shitty at everything else.[/quote]

Frequency isn’t the only component of stress in a program. You can squat every day and undertrain, you can squat once a week and over train. If you pay attention to the strong guys that hit these really high frequencies they almost always have some of the LEAST extreme training sessions.

People think that squatting every day means you take your leg day from your once a week split and do that every day, it doesn’t. My squat workout this morning was a grand total of 13 reps including warm ups. That’s extreme while 25 sets of legs on leg day isn’t? I’d say high frequency is actually the more natural non extreme method and people who starting putting a weeks’ worth of training into a session are the extreme ones.[/quote]

You are correct in this and im sure your training is appropriate for you given that you understand weekly frequency/volume as a whole as opposed to a day. But I more gear this towards newer lifters who don’t really have any business with such a high frequency because their form and recovery will not keep up.


#13

[quote]cparker wrote:

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:

[quote]cparker wrote:
I’ll never understand why people think they need to do these extreme programs, I squat 1-2x a week and have for several years and continuously make progress. People that squat everyday and are strong are outliers, everyone else who does it has a mediocre squat at best and is shitty at everything else.[/quote]

Frequency isn’t the only component of stress in a program. You can squat every day and undertrain, you can squat once a week and over train. If you pay attention to the strong guys that hit these really high frequencies they almost always have some of the LEAST extreme training sessions.

People think that squatting every day means you take your leg day from your once a week split and do that every day, it doesn’t. My squat workout this morning was a grand total of 13 reps including warm ups. That’s extreme while 25 sets of legs on leg day isn’t? I’d say high frequency is actually the more natural non extreme method and people who starting putting a weeks’ worth of training into a session are the extreme ones.[/quote]

You are correct in this and im sure your training is appropriate for you given that you understand weekly frequency/volume as a whole as opposed to a day. But I more gear this towards newer lifters who don’t really have any business with such a high frequency because their form and recovery will not keep up.
[/quote]

There are lots of ways to skin a cat. I actually like high frequency for beginners. You can get enough volume to grow and max time under the bar to practice the movements while staying far away from failure but still being moderately heavy and challenging. Form breakdown can come because of just weight OR intensity in a set. So, who is going to have more form breakdown and risk of injury, the beginner squatting for 1 set of 5 at 135 but 5 days a week, or the one squatting for 5 sets of 5 at 135 1 day a week? The overall volume and workload are the same, but the guy squatting 5 days a week is going to have better form. meanwhile the 4th and 5th set of the 1 day a week guy may be getting ugly.

Again there can be problems with the high frequency. The bigger problem is that beginners will watch bodybuilders or normal powerlifters pounding away at the volume/intensity in a session and copy that. In that style training each session is do or die 1/4 of a month worth of importance. You cannot approach high frequency that way. Daily training is a clock punching job. A roofer carrying shingles all day is never going to sniff ammonia and load himself to the breaking point for an all out live or die effort. He’s going do keep a moderate load and keep on plugging with the knowledge that he’s going to be back doing it again tomorrow. And over time his loads are naturally going to go up and he’ll start being able to get more work done. You have to have a different mind set that is very different that what typical training is like today. But, with that approach there is nothing wrong with high frequency at any level.


#14

To me the juice isn’t worth the squeeze of squatting that hard for 100 days straight and only adding 60lbs to my squat.


#15

listen to your body. While the idea of overtraining may not exist as long as your eating and sleeping enough your tendons and ligaments do not play by the same rules. Be careful if you try and if your getting achy then slow down.


#16

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
Again there can be problems with the high frequency. The bigger problem is that beginners will watch bodybuilders or normal powerlifters pounding away at the volume/intensity in a session and copy that. In that style training each session is do or die 1/4 of a month worth of importance. You cannot approach high frequency that way. Daily training is a clock punching job. A roofer carrying shingles all day is never going to sniff ammonia and load himself to the breaking point for an all out live or die effort. He’s going do keep a moderate load and keep on plugging with the knowledge that he’s going to be back doing it again tomorrow. And over time his loads are naturally going to go up and he’ll start being able to get more work done. You have to have a different mind set that is very different that what typical training is like today. But, with that approach there is nothing wrong with high frequency at any level.[/quote]

Well said.


#17

So yeah when I squat its like I blow out my tail bone ? my max is 275 I usually work around 185 to 225 for 6 to 8 reps for 4 sets.
I go booty to grass or as low as I can go it feels fine…

but man my tailbone or back left hip area seems like it just broke lol can barely get out of bed.

Anyone ever had pain here ? I have chicken legs and am in dire need of 100 days of squats.

TY for anyone who has feedback on my chicken leg problems.


#18

[quote]ARMY_AD_Bo wrote:
So yeah when I squat its like I blow out my tail bone ? my max is 275 I usually work around 185 to 225 for 6 to 8 reps for 4 sets.
I go booty to grass or as low as I can go it feels fine…

but man my tailbone or back left hip area seems like it just broke lol can barely get out of bed.

Anyone ever had pain here ? I have chicken legs and am in dire need of 100 days of squats.

TY for anyone who has feedback on my chicken leg problems.[/quote]

Leg Press


#19

[quote]ARMY_AD_Bo wrote:
So yeah when I squat its like I blow out my tail bone ? my max is 275 I usually work around 185 to 225 for 6 to 8 reps for 4 sets.
I go booty to grass or as low as I can go it feels fine…

but man my tailbone or back left hip area seems like it just broke lol can barely get out of bed.

Anyone ever had pain here ? I have chicken legs and am in dire need of 100 days of squats.

TY for anyone who has feedback on my chicken leg problems.[/quote]

post a video.


#20

[quote]ARMY_AD_Bo wrote:
So yeah when I squat its like I blow out my tail bone ? my max is 275 I usually work around 185 to 225 for 6 to 8 reps for 4 sets.
I go booty to grass or as low as I can go it feels fine…

but man my tailbone or back left hip area seems like it just broke lol can barely get out of bed.

Anyone ever had pain here ? I have chicken legs and am in dire need of 100 days of squats.

TY for anyone who has feedback on my chicken leg problems.[/quote]

chicken legs fixed …

and yeah stop a couple inches higher on squats