T Nation

Squat/Deadlift Form Check


#1

Hi :slight_smile:
I have been struggeling with my squat.
It seem like my knee are coming way to much forward, and thus i'm having problems hitting depth.
I been trying to fix it, it has gotten a lot better with new shoes, but it's still a problem.?

please let me know if you see other problem I should look into.?

Scroll to 0:30min

I don't know which deadlift styles fits my body type.
The first one is a little bit faster, but I feel a can lift more with the second style.

Any adviced is appreciate :slight_smile:

Thank you :slight_smile:


#2

The squat looks really awkward. Try moving your stance out a bit, similar to the stance width you used to unrack the weight. Right now it looks like you’re trying to sit back hard with a very narrow stance and that usually doesn’t work well. Typically people sit back harder for a wider stance compared to a narrower stance. I can see your right heel slightly lifting up as well.

For your deadlift, it doesn’t look like you’re getting tight. Learn to pull the slack out of the bar by tightening your back, bracing your core and pulling your hips forward while pushing your chest up. Your shoulder and hip position should fall in line without you having to figure out where it should be when everything is tight. You should have tension in your quads, hamstrings, hips and torso and the lift should be initiated when your scapulae are over the bar. If you need a visual, your armpit should be over the bar. The starting position on the first rep didn’t look bad but your hips shoot up and your chest shoots forward because aren’t staying tight and loading your quads, hams and hips. Hope that helps.


#3

[quote]lift206 wrote:
The squat looks really awkward. Try moving your stance out a bit, similar to the stance width you used to unrack the weight. Right now it looks like you’re trying to sit back hard with a very narrow stance and that usually doesn’t work well. Typically people sit back harder for a wider stance compared to a narrower stance. I can see your right heel slightly lifting up as well.

For your deadlift, it doesn’t look like you’re getting tight. Learn to pull the slack out of the bar by tightening your back, bracing your core and pulling your hips forward while pushing your chest up. Your shoulder and hip position should fall in line without you having to figure out where it should be when everything is tight. You should have tension in your quads, hamstrings, hips and torso and the lift should be initiated when your scapulae are over the bar. If you need a visual, your armpit should be over the bar. The starting position on the first rep didn’t look bad but your hips shoot up and your chest shoots forward because aren’t staying tight and loading your quads, hams and hips. Hope that helps.[/quote]

Thanks your feedback. :slight_smile:

I will try to stand a little wider for my squat, and see what happens.
I also have a problem with breaking at the knees and hips concurrently, I have to work on that too.

I don’t think I understand this part “Your shoulder and hip position should fall in line…”

How do get my armbit over the bar.? learn more back?

Thanks again. :slight_smile:


#4

Wall squats. Face a wall with your toes about 3 inches away and squat without touching the wall. Do this in flats, or go barefoot. It will help you learn how to sit back and stay off your toes.


#5

[quote]denmyos wrote:
Thanks your feedback. :slight_smile:

I will try to stand a little wider for my squat, and see what happens.
I also have a problem with breaking at the knees and hips concurrently, I have to work on that too.

I don’t think I understand this part “Your shoulder and hip position should fall in line…”

How do get my armbit over the bar.? learn more back?

Thanks again. :)[/quote]

Once you get everything tight, it’s a lot easier to understand this. If you aren’t tight, the imbalance will throw you out of position.

To get your torso tight, brace your abs and squeeze the armpit area hard to lock your shoulders in place while allowing you to squeeze your chest and lats hard. Keep your chest up and proud. When you pull the slack out of the bar, your torso should be rigid as you pull up/back and your armpits move back over the bar (assuming you start in front of the bar). You’re basically pushing into the ground, pulling the bar and levering yourself back.

Your hips should automatically end up in a good position to initiate the lift if you create tension in your quads, hamstrings and hips. This is because your scapulae should be over the bar for an optimal pull and if you create a rigid torso, the hips should just end up where they end up. This could mean your shins are vertical or slightly over the bar depending on your body proportions. If you force yourself to use too much quad strength, your knees will end up being a lot more forward. If you force yourself to use too much hamstring strength, your knees will shoot back. Relying on both quad and hamstring strength will likely provide the most potential for strength so the weight distribution should be balanced close to midfoot.

Learn to create tension in your hips to prevent it from shooting back and to control its movement. Try doing some pause deadlifts where you pause just below the knees. Record yourself and try to keep your scapulae over the bar instead of forward of it during this pause. This should help you learn to be more patient instead of letting your hips shoot up right when you start the pull.

What Alrightmiami19c recommended is also very effective in teaching you to lead with the chest and thrust the hips forward. It’s hard to cheat if it means face planting into a wall. The wall squats will also give you a better idea of what stance width to use and how to angle your feet when squatting.


#6

@Alrightmiami19c
I can actually do wall squat with my toes a inch from the wall, it’s not easy though.
Have to turn my head otherwise my nose will scrap the wall. :slight_smile:
The problem is when I put some weight on the bar, then my knees come forward, (to counter balance??)

But I think this second attempt is a little better.
Squat second attempt

I know my feet are all over the floor before I step out, but then I get them under control.
I have a little wider stance, which seems to help with my knees not coming way in front of my toes.
But I still need to tighten up the knee area, cause the knees are all over the place.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCv8666XAwc

Deadlift second attempt
My knees are still not tight at the end of my lift.
But I manage to pull the slack out of the bar and tighten everything up, and thinking about keep my chest high.
I can see I still need to pull more back in the bar when I pull out the slack.
Stupid question?
Won’t I fall backwards when I start my lift, or is that counter balanced when the hips are shooting forward?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vx463pUS0to&feature=youtu.be


#7

For wall squats, instead of turning your head sideways to get closer to the wall it may be a better idea to just move further from the wall to maintain tightness throughout the body. Your spinal position shouldn’t change throughout the lift. You have to prioritize tightness and execution of the lift over how close you are to the wall, even if this means cutting depth and increasing ROM over time in order to maintain tightness in the lumbar spine.

Try doing paused wall squats as well to emphasize hip control. It should feel like you’re feet are pushing the floor apart and screwing into the ground.

Your squat does look a bit better. For both lifts, you still need to learn to generate tension in your hips. Your hip abductors and adductors help stabilize your knee position. You shouldn’t fall back if you learn to pull slack out of the bar correctly. Creating tension in your hips will help to pull it forward and maintain that hip angle so your hips don’t shoot back.


#8

Thanks again. :slight_smile:

Will try that the next couple of weeks and see what happens. :slight_smile:

Thank you :slight_smile:


#9

No problem and good luck!


#10

I did a little test.
I did a modified wall squat to see if i could prevent my knees to shooting out in front of my toes.

It seems like when I have no or little weight on the bar i can control my knees.
But when i have weigth on the bar they will shoot way in front of my toes, and thus i will have problems hitting depth.

What seems to cause this.?


#11

It looks like you still aren’t getting tight or your positioning doesn’t allow you to get tight. You’re worried about where your knees end up but that’s not as important as maintaining tension in your back, abs and hips. Once you create tension in those areas and maintain tension throughout the entire rep, the form will take care of itself. It looks like you’re still sitting back too much for how narrow your stance is. Either sit in between your legs instead of back when using such a narrow stance or use a wider stance if you want to sit back that much.

To better understand what I mean, try doing some paused seated good mornings. Use your squat stance width and have your knees in front of your ankles to simulate the bottom of your squat. This will also place more tension in your glutes rather than your hamstrings which is what you need to focus on for now. Use a weight that you can control and lean forward but only to a point where you can still keep a rigid torso. Create an arch in your back to get your erectors tight, brace your abs hard, create tension in your groin area by squeezing the hips closed and push your knees out using your gluteus medius as you lean forward. Hold that position for a few seconds. Remember how tight and controlled your hips feel when doing this and do the same thing when squatting. If you do this correctly, your spine won’t go into flexion. It may take some time getting used to.


#12

The reason why I’m worried about my knees is that I have problems hitting depth when they pass the toes as much as mine does.
pr say I’m not worried about the knee passing the toes, its the distance.

I’m deliberately sitting back to prevent my knee from shoot forward.
Or has my knees shoot forward nothing to do with sitting back.?

I will try seated good morning, and see if I can tight up.

I will report back on a later date. :slight_smile:

Thanks again


#13

For the squats google something like “sheiko wall squats” and there will be an article about this corrective exercise that sheiko uses with his own students. It’s helped me a lot. It will reduce the forward knee travel that you seem to be having problems with. I would also widen the stance a bit.

As for the deadlifts, you seem to have a long back. I don’t know strong you are, but lifting loads of weight with a long back usually isn’t easy. We have similar builds, and switching to sumo really helped me, my pull really took off when I did it.


#14

[quote]denmyos wrote:
The reason why I’m worried about my knees is that I have problems hitting depth when they pass the toes as much as mine does.
pr say I’m not worried about the knee passing the toes, its the distance.

I’m deliberately sitting back to prevent my knee from shoot forward.
Or has my knees shoot forward nothing to do with sitting back.?

I will try seated good morning, and see if I can tight up.

I will report back on a later date. :slight_smile:

Thanks again[/quote]

Hitting depth requires you to open up your hips regardless of your stance width and knee travel. You can have a lot of forward knee travel for a narrow stance and less for a wide stance. Also keep in mind that it won’t be very helpful to hit depth while losing tightness - it will be difficult to train and develop the intended muscles. Hopefully the seated good morning or the article mentioned by DaneMuscle will help.