T Nation

Squat 1RM vs Deadlift 1RM

Is it usually the case that one can squat more than they can deadlift? I ask because at the momment my deadlift is at 405lbs. and my squat is at 365lbs, and I am wondering what I am not doing right.

I don’t follow powerlifting that much, but I do notice that powerlifters always squat more than they deadlift.

I’m guessing you’re lifting raw. With a suit, a powerlifter can squat more than he deadlifts because equipment provides very minimal support to a dl as opposed to the couple hundred pounds an elite lifter can add to a squat w/ wraps and a suit.

Don’t worry i dead more then i squat also. No biggie, my body mechanics are more suited to pulling and the deadlift always feels more natural then the squat to me.

I dead more than I squat also.

I also deadlift more than i squat.
I think that is normal as said for a raw lifter.

I dead more than I squat as well, and you know what is really strange is that I can bench close to what I squat. I am maxing out on the big three this tuesday and I am going for around 345ish on bench, 365ish squat and 405 dead.

I just don’t feel solid when I squat. I think it has a lot to do with my flexability, but I am in a similar stance when I DL so I am not sure. I guess we all just need to do more squats.

185 bench 225 squat (havn’t back squatted in a long time) 315 dead

Only one I’m up to date on is bench.

It’s easy dead more than squat, when you are not so high level lifter. Despite are you Raw or using equipments. When a guy first time try dl and sq max it’s pretty sure that dl is bigger. I’m “puller type”, but now sq closing dl(about 410-460 ).

But what are “typical” results in sq/dl of raw lifters meet - especially heavy division lifters?

[quote]wtagye wrote:
I dead more than I squat as well, and you know what is really strange is that I can bench close to what I squat. I am maxing out on the big three this tuesday and I am going for around 345ish on bench, 365ish squat and 405 dead.

I just don’t feel solid when I squat. I think it has a lot to do with my flexability, but I am in a similar stance when I DL so I am not sure. I guess we all just need to do more squats.
[/quote]

You’re typically in a much higher position when you squat than when you dead (at least I hope you are, otherwise you’re squatting too high or getting down too low to DL. Thus flexibility is more important for the squat.

Good to know I am not doing something wrong. I knew gear helped squatting, I didn’t know it helped that much. I did a 1RM in squat today and it was 385 lbs., and my deadlift is currently 405lbs., so there isn’t that big a difference.

[quote]cap’nsalty wrote:
You’re typically in a much higher position when you squat than when you dead (at least I hope you are, otherwise you’re squatting too high or getting down too low to DL. Thus flexibility is more important for the squat.
[/quote]
Noted, I think that the main factor in my situation is my flexability. One interesting thing is changing from running shoes to a flatter shoe. Made a huge difference, in fact I almost fell back the first time I did GMs after changing shoes since I had to sit back so far previously.

[quote]temppa wrote:
It’s easy dead more than squat, when you are not so high level lifter. Despite are you Raw or using equipments. When a guy first time try dl and sq max it’s pretty sure that dl is bigger. I’m “puller type”, but now sq closing dl(about 410-460 ).

But what are “typical” results in sq/dl of raw lifters meet - especially heavy division lifters?[/quote]

My buddy is a RAW lifter that is in the 275 class. His deadlift ranges to be about 75-100 pounds higher than his squat, depending on where his training focus is.

My deadlift and squat are pretty close to one another (about 2-5% apart) after I spent a few months focusing on the squat, but I’m only in the 198lb division.

Regards,

Sensless

It’s going to depend on a number of factors, most notably:

  1. The lifter’s build: Long-torso, short-limbed lifters will be better squatters/benchers, and long-limb, short-torso lifters will be better deadlifters.

  2. Equipment: Squat suits, briefs, and knee wraps all help with the squat. Deadlift suits are becoming more and more common and effective, though.

  3. Form: You’re a lot more likely to squat a lot if you learn to squat with your posterior chain moreso than with your quads.

[quote]Eric Cressey wrote:

  1. Form: You’re a lot more likely to squat a lot if you learn to squat with your posterior chain moreso than with your quads.[/quote]

You mean by sitting back more correct?