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Sprinting..... Muscle Saver?

I’ve heard that interval sprints are great for fat loss and muscle preservation. Can anyone confirm this? Does anyone practice this and if so, what type of program do you follow?

Thanks

I’ve been doing fullbody workouts 3x a week with 2x HIIT for the last month. I am still the same weight because I didn’t adjust calories but I gained half an inch on my arms and lost around an inch around my waist. So I think it works pretty great.

I am doing Waterbury’s Summer Project, which also has sprints

So the answer to my question seems to be a yes.

Thanks folks.

[quote]HogLover wrote:
So the answer to my question seems to be a yes.

Thanks folks.[/quote]

Yup HIIT is an anabolic form of cardio where as most is Very catabolic in nature.

Here these will help,

Cardio confusion
http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=05-012-training

Cardio Roundatble I&II
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=461325
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=461524

There are other in the ole search function as well.

Phill

[quote]Phill wrote:
HogLover wrote:
So the answer to my question seems to be a yes.

Thanks folks.

Yup HIIT is an anabolic form of cardio where as most is Very catabolic in nature.

Here these will help,

Cardio confusion
http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=05-012-training

Cardio Roundatble I&II
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=461325
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=461524

There are other in the ole search function as well.

Phill
[/quote]

Don’t mean to be an ass but don’t you mean anaerobic not anabolic. Calling any form of cardio anabolic is a bit of stretch. Whether it’s anabolic or not is dependant outside of the training.

No, Phill does mean that HIIT is an anabolic form of cardio, whereas most forms of cardio that most people perform are catabolic (long distance runs, etc.)

[quote]rawda wrote:
No, Phill does mean that HIIT is an anabolic form of cardio, whereas most forms of cardio that most people perform are catabolic (long distance runs, etc.)[/quote]

Care to explain the anabolic mechanism, because I don’t understand how cardio can be anabolic. The only chances I see it being MILDLY anabolic are on a serious bulk.

[quote]X-Factor wrote:
rawda wrote:
No, Phill does mean that HIIT is an anabolic form of cardio, whereas most forms of cardio that most people perform are catabolic (long distance runs, etc.)

Care to explain the anabolic mechanism, because I don’t understand how cardio can be anabolic. The only chances I see it being MILDLY anabolic are on a serious bulk.[/quote]

Sprinting builds your glutes. Take a look at sprinters and their butts. Nice, round firm tushes with great legs attached. I did sprint intervals leading up to my contest. No other ‘cardio’.

[quote]AG1 wrote:
X-Factor wrote:
rawda wrote:
No, Phill does mean that HIIT is an anabolic form of cardio, whereas most forms of cardio that most people perform are catabolic (long distance runs, etc.)

Care to explain the anabolic mechanism, because I don’t understand how cardio can be anabolic. The only chances I see it being MILDLY anabolic are on a serious bulk.

Sprinting builds your glutes. Take a look at sprinters and their butts. Nice, round firm tushes with great legs attached. I did sprint intervals leading up to my contest. No other ‘cardio’.[/quote]

In what form did you do sprints? 50 yards, 100 yards, 10 yards? How close were the intervals?

[quote]HogLover wrote:
AG1 wrote:
X-Factor wrote:
rawda wrote:
No, Phill does mean that HIIT is an anabolic form of cardio, whereas most forms of cardio that most people perform are catabolic (long distance runs, etc.)

Care to explain the anabolic mechanism, because I don’t understand how cardio can be anabolic. The only chances I see it being MILDLY anabolic are on a serious bulk.

Sprinting builds your glutes. Take a look at sprinters and their butts. Nice, round firm tushes with great legs attached. I did sprint intervals leading up to my contest. No other ‘cardio’.

In what form did you do sprints? 50 yards, 100 yards, 10 yards? How close were the intervals?[/quote]

Look at Chad’s WSP and use that as a template. You can gear the individual times to your fitness level. Push yourself but you also don’t need to be falling over dying to get results.

Well yes it is anaerobic and has gthe potential to be ANABOLIC as well as in creating enough stimuls/load etc to force the body to Build muscle. To create new tissue to fill the high demand and stress you are putting it under. The sprinter physique is a great example.

Where as steady state is well nothing but catabolic which hell can be great for catabolising FAT but also has potential to catabolis muscle as well. Look at a marathon runner. Once again it is the body adjusting to the demands you put it under. if your jogging for miles/hours etc the body wants to make your desired task easier. How By losing weight. Your not asking it like in a sprint for maximal output.

So in short you are setting yourself up for an anabolic environment with HIIT etc. And sure you need fuel/food for that, but still even on a fat loss diet the stimulus you are putting the body under makes the body think DAMN I need this muscle on a regular basis for day to day activity I better keep it (HOPEFULLY BUILD SOME MORE) and shed some blubber.

That help,
Phill

First of all no exercise can be described as “anabolic” or “catabolic”. Such terms are not applicable to exercise.

Secondly, the word “sprint” seems to be taken to mean anything other than steady-state aerobics, when clearly most of you who employ “HIIT” are not literally sprinting. The type of “sprinting” that is valuable for fat loss is not necessarily conducive to building or even maintaining muscle mass.

Third,
sprinting is not good for building muscle. Yes, there are some muscular sprinters, but there are also some very skinny ones- shit the WR holder in the 110m hurdles doesn’t look like he does any kind of exercise.

The sprinters who are muscular got the muscles from genetics and weight training, not sprinting. Finally, sprinting does not “preserve” muscle- it’s just less offensive than huge volumes of steady-state exercise.